News Contact lost with 777-200ER of Malaysia Airlines

Artlav

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I flew similar routes in the MSFSX. You land on the water (pontoon Cessna), cheatcode more fuel, fly on, land, cheatcode, fly on, all the way to antarctica.
 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36904981

The crashed remains from the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 could be as much as 500km further north than the current search area, say scientists in Italy.

Their assessment is based on the location of confirmed debris items and computer modelling that incorporates ocean and weather data.

They say this has allowed them to determine where the plane most likely hit the water and where future aircraft fragments might wash up.
 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-36938480

A world-leading air crash investigator has said he believes flight MH370 was deliberately flown into the sea.

Larry Vance told Australian news programme 60 Minutes that erosion along the trailing edge of recovered wing parts indicated a controlled landing.

The Boeing 777 disappeared while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board in March 2014.

The official investigation team has said it is investigating whether the plane was piloted in its final moments
 

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I read that BBC page about the flaperon. (Item number 1 on the big picture at that site.) Is that torn trailing edge really a good indication of the surface being in the deployed position when water landing? Or could it happen some other way?

I'm not calling the guy a liar at all, and don't actually expect anyone here to know, I just have my sceptical head on and wonder if this is really a significant opinion or just more speculation...
 

Urwumpe

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I read that BBC page about the flaperon. (Item number 1 on the big picture at that site.) Is that torn trailing edge really a good indication of the surface being in the deployed position when water landing? Or could it happen some other way?

I'm not calling the guy a liar at all, and don't actually expect anyone here to know, I just have my sceptical head on and wonder if this is really a significant opinion or just more speculation...
Well, it is not just the trailing edge erosion, but yes, it is a (weak) sign for deployment.

The reasoning is: The trailing edge must hit the water long enough and with enough speed to get destroyed that way. If the plane would just fly nearly stalled into the ocean with flaps retracted, the pressure of the water would act on a bigger surface of the flap before it is torn off.

If it is deployed, and the landing more or less controlled, the flap would be eroded at the end while the majority of the flap only experiences air pressure.

Of course, there are uncertainties. An experimental reproduction of the damage would be nice to see if the theory holds water.
 

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A world-leading air crash investigator has said he believes flight MH370 was deliberately flown into the sea.

Larry Vance told Australian news programme 60 Minutes that erosion along the trailing edge of recovered wing parts indicated a controlled landing.

The Boeing 777 disappeared while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board in March 2014.

The official investigation team has said it is investigating whether the plane was piloted in its final moments
Is it really fair to call controlled ditching "deliberately flown into the sea"?
Poor or sensationalized word choice there, considering that the pilot is being accused of murder-suicide by some.

Seems to me that evidence of a controlled ditching attempt would exonerate the pilot. I would not expect the flaps to be lowered during a suicide crash.
 

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I don't know, if I was on a "controlled ditching" I would want the pilots to be deliberate, as in each step thought about and contained, and not the opposite of deliberate, chaotic?

I give the author the benefit of the doubt, and its a use of English language.

Edit: though thinking about it "deliberate" in spoken context is usually pejorative, and the step by step sense isn't often used...

N.
 
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-37333762

Five new pieces of debris that could belong to the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have been found in Madagascar.
Two fragments appear to show burn marks, which if confirmed would be the first time such marks have been found.
MH370, flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, had 239 people on board when it vanished in March 2014.
 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-37843752

Wreckage analysis suggests Flight MH370 did not make a controlled descent into the Indian Ocean, says a new report.
The Boeing 777 disappeared while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board in March 2014.
The report from Australian investigators suggests the aircraft's wing flaps were in a "cruise" position when it hit the ocean surface.
 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-39637974

Malaysia Airlines has become the first carrier to sign up to a new satellite flight tracking system for its fleet.
It comes three years after its MH370 flight bound for Beijing disappeared with 239 people on board.
Using a soon-to-be-launched satellite network, the airline will be able to monitor its planes in areas where there is currently no surveillance.
They include polar regions and remote areas of oceans not covered by existing systems.
First of many, hopefully.

N.
 

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Good use of the Iridium network too.

N.
 

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http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-...nfident-mh370-is-north-of-search-zone/8460658

In a report prepared for the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), CSIRO scientists cite new research further indicating the aircraft is north of the actual search zone, in an area twice the size of greater Sydney (25,000km2).
The ATSB and the Federal Transport Minister's office have been contacted for comment as to whether this new data in the report constitutes credible new evidence.
My money is on no, but if someone covers part of the cost, it might start again. Otherwise, if there is another bit of evidence that also matches, then something might happen.
 

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Another update: Data science and the search for MH370

From the article:
The DSTG used its computers to generate a huge number of possible routes and then test them to see which best fit the observed data. Their endpoints were pooled to generate a probabilistic “heat map” of the plane’s most likely resting places using a technique called Bayesian analysis. These calculations allowed the DSTG team to draw a box 400 miles long and 70 miles across, which contained about 90 percent of the total probability distribution. The impressive thoroughness of their work gave the countries responsible for the search—Australia, Malaysia, and China—the confidence to commit $150 million to a scan of the remote ocean seabed.
 
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