Question What are you reading?

EJ316

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Currently reading Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan. Enjoying it so far.
 

martins

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I have just finished "Logicomix - An epic search for truth".
http://www.logicomix.com/en/

It depicts the search for the foundations of mathematics (and in particular the life of Bertrand Russell) in the form of a "graphic novel".

Very recommendable if you are into mathematics, logic and philosophy.
 

Eccentrus

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just finished Pale Blue Dot - Carl Sagan, now reading Richard Dawkin's Greatest Show on Earth, and Flirting With Disaster - Marc something.
 

Orbinaut Pete

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Currently reading the astronaut memoir "Sky Walking" by Tom Jones. Mostly enjoyable, but a little dry.
I agree. I found it good for technical information, but it can never live up to Mike Mullane's "Riding Rockets" (I’m not sure any astronaut memoir ever can).

Jones tends to focus more on the science performed on his missions, than the personal/fun/toilet humour aspects of them.

My favourite three bits in “Sky Walking” are the STS-80 landing chapter, the entire section on the history of ISS (very revealing), & the STS-98 launch/rendezvous with ISS/EVAs/landing chapters.

When you get to it, the part about Mark Lee is very intriguing.
 
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T.Neo

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I'm currently reading orbiter-forum.com.

It's awesome.

:rofl:
 

Orbinaut Pete

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Just read it last night. Office politics is everywhere, eh?
Sure is - I guess that's why they call it the Astronaut Office! :lol:

I did some research about Mark Lee, and all I could find was a CNN article stating that he was removed from STS-98 due to "a breakdown of communication between Lee and at least one of his superiors".

Apparently he appealed against the decision, but he was unsuccessful.

He never flew in space again, and retired from NASA in 2001. :shrug:
 

Graham2001

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'Trial Run', classic Dick Francis & the only thriller about the 1980 Olympics to remain in print.
 

Urwumpe

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"The Adamantine throne" by Stephen Deas... solid fantasy novel with some surprising twists in the story...sadly without a successor yet. The only bad thing: The royal politics take a lot of volume in the story without reaching nearly the complexity of the politics you can get in BattleTech novels... it gets a bit too predictive there.
 

Andy44

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I still have a stack of BattleTech novels around somewhere. They were very addictive, but they are all apparently out of print now and some of the stories, particularly Mike Stackpole's series about the Assasin, were sadly never completed.

Stackpole in particular was the best BTech writer, even though his stories were long on intrigue and a little short on action.
 

eveningsky339

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Just After Sunset

Stephen King, of course. :thumbup: Haven't had any nightmares yet-- which is odd, I usually have at least one when I read his material.
 

Urwumpe

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..., particularly Mike Stackpole's series about the Assasin, were sadly never completed.
AFAIR, it did end in the Novel "Endgame", written by Coleman, instead of Stackpole...Coleman was responsible for writing dead a lot of characters for pleasing the new franchise owner Wizkids.
 

Ark

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I need some hard sci-fi to read. I've blown through most of Stephen Baxter's books (great stuff), about 90% of Ben Bova's Grand Tour series, and a scattering of stuff from Heinlein and Clarke. I like these guys because they usually abstain from magical FTL drives and button-toggled artificial gravity. I like my science, and bonus points for fiction with actual Shuttle/Soyuz/ISS tech.
 

Andy44

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I need some hard sci-fi to read. I've blown through most of Stephen Baxter's books (great stuff), about 90% of Ben Bova's Grand Tour series, and a scattering of stuff from Heinlein and Clarke. I like these guys because they usually abstain from magical FTL drives and button-toggled artificial gravity. I like my science, and bonus points for fiction with actual Shuttle/Soyuz/ISS tech.
Have you looked into Niven and Pournelle? If you haven't read Footfall I recommend it.

Also, The Mote in God's Eye is really good. It's set in Pournelle's future history universe, and it's my favorite first contact story.

---------- Post added at 12:22 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:20 AM ----------

I'm currently working my way through my Christmas gift: [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Space-Shuttle-National-Transportation-Missions/dp/0963397451"]Amazon.com: Space Shuttle: The History of the National Space Transportation System The First 100 Missions, 3rd Edition (9780963397454): Dennis R Jenkins: Books[/ame]
 

Loru

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I need some hard sci-fi to read. I've blown through most of Stephen Baxter's books (great stuff), about 90% of Ben Bova's Grand Tour series, and a scattering of stuff from Heinlein and Clarke. I like these guys because they usually abstain from magical FTL drives and button-toggled artificial gravity. I like my science, and bonus points for fiction with actual Shuttle/Soyuz/ISS tech.
Alastair Reynolds - "Revelation Space"
Revelation Space. London: Gollancz, 2000. ISBN 0-575-06875-2
Chasm City. London: Gollancz, 2001. ISBN 0-575-06877-9
Redemption Ark. London: Gollancz, 2002. ISBN 0-575-06879-5
Absolution Gap. London: Gollancz, 2003. ISBN 0-575-07434-5
The Prefect. London: Gollancz, 2007, ISBN 0-575-07716-6


Peter F Hamilton - "The Night's Dawn Trilogy"
The Reality Dysfunction (1996, published in two volumes in the U.S." Emergence and Expansion), ISBN 0-330-34032-8
The Neutronium Alchemist (1997, published in two volumes in the U.S." Consolidation and Conflict), ISBN 0-330-35143-5
The Naked God (1999, published in two volumes in paperback in the U.S.: Flight and Faith; the US hardback was one volume), ISBN 0-330-35145-1

For me it was a great stuff.
 
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