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Orbinaut Pete

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From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 28/09/2011.

Conjunction Alert:
Flight controllers are tracking a new conjunction, with Object 23335 (S/L-4 Rocket Body), a repeating conjunction with two TCAs (Times of Closest Approach) tomorrow, 09/29 (Thursday), at 7:02 PM and 8:34 PM GMT (which are still moving around). Although the miss distances have moved out on some of the revs, one or more of them still could pose a risk to ISS. The current geomagnetic storm (which affects atmospheric density) is starting to subside, so it is hoped that the data will begin to stabilize prior to hitting the DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver) planning milestones. The decision timeline for preparing maneuver data (the cyclogram) will be this afternoon at 7:32 PM GMT, for a DAM on 09/29 at 4:44 PM GMT (est.).
 

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Orbinaut Pete

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From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 29/09/2011.

In the JAXA JPM, FE-5 Satoshi Furukawa continued the activation & checkout (commissioning) of the MSPR (Multipurpose Small Payload Rack). [Satoshi first powered up MSPR components, i.e., the VRU (Video Recording Unit)/Hub, MPC (Multi Protocol Converter) & MSPR laptop and ran a virus check on the USB memory stick from SSC-15 (Station Support Computer-15), then checked out the USB communication line in MSPR. Afterwards, the rack components were turned off.]

Conjunction Avoidance-cum-Reboost Update:
Since today's 7:02 PM GMT conjunction with Object 23335 (S/L-4 Rocket Body) remained in the Red zone early this morning, US and Russian flight controllers agreed to perform the DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver) discussed earlier, in the process also replacing the reboost originally planned at 10/05, since the same targeting for downstream constraints (Progress M-13M/45P phasing) had to be used as for the 10/05 maneuver. The maneuver was conducted at 4:44 PM GMT with the SM (Service Module) KD engines for a delta-V of 2.53 m/s, 169 sec duration and 4.6 km altitude increase, and was nominal. It also took care of another upcoming conjunction, with Object 30188 (Fengyun 1C Debris), on 10/02

ACT Test:
An ACT (American Contingency Telemetry) test by MCC-Houston and TsUP-Moscow is scheduled for tonight, with commanding to and telemetry from ISS through Russian assets. On DO3 (Daily Orbit 3, 12:45 AM-1:09 AM GMT) and DO4 (2:21 AM-2:45 AM GMT), command radio link & telemetry systems will be configured for real-time command uplink & receipt of ACT via RGSs (Russian Ground Sites), assuming no S-band command capability. For the tests, US PPCP (Pre Planned Command Package) and US real-time commanding from MCC-H will be uplinked via RGS via TsUP and RGS.
 

Capt_hensley

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Sometimes these updates are a bit too detailed, entwined with technical stuff that goes way over a normal persons head. I wonder who they think their audience is?

It's nice info none the less, it gives me something to lookup and learn about.

(Why can't they say "ISS boosted its orbit today to avoid hitting a spent rocket stage")
 

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That would be serving the lowest common denominator, that is what the 6-o-clock news is for.
 

Orbinaut Pete

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Sometimes these updates are a bit too detailed, entwined with technical stuff that goes way over a normal persons head. I wonder who they think their audience is?

It's nice info none the less, it gives me something to lookup and learn about.

(Why can't they say "ISS boosted its orbit today to avoid hitting a spent rocket stage")

Those kind of updates are available on NASA's main ISS webpage, which is targeted toward the general, non-technical public.

The updates in the status reports I post are targeted at people with an in-depth knowledge of the ISS, which is why they're so acronym laden (which I myself love, cos I'm a technical kinda guy). :lol:
 

N_Molson

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Please keep it this way, very interesting stuff ! :thumbup:
 

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Is all that debris-conjunction-stuff at the moment bad luck or is it simply the fact, that the number of debris is increasing in the last few years.
Or is this because we are able to track smaller objects better than ever before and 5 years ago were the same problems, but information about little debris were missing?
 

Orbinaut Pete

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Is all that debris-conjunction-stuff at the moment bad luck or is it simply the fact, that the number of debris is increasing in the last few years.
Or is this because we are able to track smaller objects better than ever before and 5 years ago were the same problems, but information about little debris were missing?

Interestingly, since June when the ISS was boosted ~30km higher by ATV-2, the chances of conjunctions have increased by 50-100%, since more objects can be tracked at this altitude.
 

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That's probably a good thing. It's the one that can't be tracked, will be the one to get ya. :yes:
 

Orbinaut Pete

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From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 04/10/2011.

Node-2 ISL Router Update:
FE-5 Satoshi Furukawa's replacement of the ISL (Integrated Station LAN) network Router in Node 2 yesterday was successful. The Router, in location Overhead 4, is connected to a large number of Ethernet cables and a power cable. To simplify the transfer of cable connections, the failed ISL Router was raised above the new ISL Router, and Satoshi did one-for one-cable swaps between the two units. Afterwards MCC-H reconfigured the Router via SSCs (Station Support Computer) laptops #9 & #11 and the ISL Interface panel. ISS LAN (Local Area Network) and CSL (Crew Support LAN) networks are back to normal onboard ISS.
 

Capt_hensley

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I do this for a living on the ground for the Mission Command Training Program @ Ft Leavenworth Ks, glad to see they have the same issues aboard the ISS. It was probably made in China. :facepalm: I wonder if they use Cisco networking solutions for Space?
 

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From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 05/10/2011.

CDR Mike Fossum had about 90 min reserved for installing an IMV (Inter Module Ventilation) return jumper between Node 1 (location Deck 1) and the attached PMM (Permanent Multipurpose Module) "Leonardo", intended to facilitate IMV flow when hatches are closed. FE-5 Satoshi Furukawa assisted with the actual installation of the air duct. [Steps included removing the Node 1 Deck Fwd Outboard IMV cap, equalizing & removing the Node 1 Inboard IMV cap, reinstalling Node 1 closeout panels, installing the IMV jumper/duct, and closing out the worksite.]

JAXA Marangoni Experiment:
The crew was advised of another Marangoni bridge building event tonight (11:00 PM-5:00 AM GMT), the 10th in 24 planned bridge buildings in Increment 29/30. The experiment is performed in the Kibo JPM during crew sleep (since the liquid bridge to be formed is sensitive to g-jitter), 4 days/week at most and 24 runs in total. After the liquid bridge has been formed, the ground imposes a temperature gradient on it to produce Marangoni convection. The crew, which will be informed regularly, has been asked to avoid any disturbances in this timeframe. Even disturbances in other modules can be transmitted and cause the liquid bridge in JPM to break up, resulting in science loss.

Conjunction Alert:
Flight controllers continue to monitor the conjunction with Object #30002, debris from the Chinese satellite Fengyun 1C, currently classified as of low concern due to several tracking updates. TCA (Time of Closest Approach) will be tomorrow (10/06) at 2:04 PM GMT. A DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver), which would have to be conducted at ~11:46 AM GMT, is considered not necessary at this time.
 

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CBS News Space: Station crew studies how microgravity affects eyesight:
In the wake of recent concerns about the effects of prolonged weightlessness on eyesight, space station astronauts now are carrying out regular tests and eye exams to collect more data on how their vision might be affected, the lab's commander said Thursday.

"Periodically, we do different tests and this week is one of those weeks where we do the vision tests," Expedition 29 commander Mike Fossum told CBS News. "First is the visual acuity test, which everybody does when you go to the doctor's office. Yesterday, we performed ultasounds of our eyes, where we measured the details of the eyeball to see if there's any physical changes, including the optic nerve on the back of the eyeball.


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Orbinaut Pete

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From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 06/10/2011.

Conjunction Update:
The conjunction with Object #30002, debris from the Chinese satellite Fengyun 1C, is gone without requiring a DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver). TCA (Time of Closest Approach) was today at 2:04 PM GMT, well within the Green zone.
 

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From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 07/10/2011.

Soyuz 26S Update:
According to RSC Energia/Moscow specialists, the recent Soyuz TMA-21/26S descent communication issue is believed to have been due to a poor quality link between ISS and Soyuz or blockage. This issue is considered closed.
 

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From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 10/10/2011.

CDR Mike Fossum had several hours set aside to install the ARFTA (Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly) at the UPA WRS (Urine Processor Assembly | Water Recovery System). [Steps included emptying the WSTA (Wastewater Storage Tank Assembly) into an EDV-U to allow for room in the WSTA for DA (Distillation Assembly) dry-out and breaking out the RFTA (Recycle Filter Tank Assembly) modification kit for the procedure. Afterwards, the RFTA mod kit was restowed.]

COL Ventilation Test:
Today, COL-CC (Columbus Orbital Laboratory-Control Center) performed a set of COL air loop tests to assess CFA-1 (Cabin Fan Assembly-1) stability and to test two three-fan configurations for ISS Decrewing. The test ran from 8:15 AM to 4:35 PM GMT. During the tests, the crew was to minimize their presence in COL to mitigate impacting the test results.

JAXA Marangoni Experiment:
The crew was advised of another Marangoni bridge building event tonight (11:00 PM-5:00 AM GMT), the 11th in 24 planned bridge buildings in Increment 29/30. The experiment is performed in the Kibo JPM during crew sleep (since the liquid bridge to be formed is sensitive to g-jitter), 4 days/week at most and 24 runs in total. After the liquid bridge has been formed, the ground imposes a temperature gradient on it to produce Marangoni convection. The crew, which is being informed regularly, has been asked to avoid any disturbances in this timeframe. Even disturbances in other modules can be transmitted and cause the liquid bridge in JPM to break up, resulting in science loss.
 

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Aviation Week: Move Space Station Parts Toward The Moon?:
Governments and industry involved in the International Space Station are tempering their plans for human exploration to fit today’s tough economic environment, including a look at recycling ISS components for use beyond low Earth orbit after 2020.

ISS partner-agency chiefs who met here at the 62nd International Astronautical Congress (IAC) last week will take the first tentative steps toward joint exploration of the Solar System, based both on the ISS model for cooperation and perhaps on some station hardware as well.

“Could we take a module, pull it off the station instead of deorbiting it into the ocean?” asks William Gerstenmaier, associate NASA administrator for human exploration and operations. “Could we take some module that has some value to us in exploration architecture and move it to [Lagrangian point] L1 or move it to a lunar orbit and actually use it in another location?”

NASA and the Russian space agency, Roscosmos, have agreed to set up an “expert-level group” to review exploration targets for joint cooperation, provided the two sides can agree on where to go and how to get there. Vladimir Popovkin, the new Roscosmos head, told an IAC plenary that deep-space exploration is “unthinkable without broader international cooperation,” because of the cost.

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