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Woo482

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oh ok :) I was reading about that the other day
 

Chipstone306

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Crew Conducts Spacewalk Dress Rehearsal

Image above: Image above: The International Space Station flies over Hurricane Bertha on Tuesday. Credit: NASA TV

The Expedition 17 crew of the International Space Station worked Tuesday towards completing preparations for a pair of spacewalks. They donned their spacesuits for a dry run and inspected hatch seals.

Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko put on their Orlan spacesuits in a full dress rehearsal of Thursday’s spacewalk. The two cosmonauts tested their ability to move around and the status of the suits’ communication gear and other systems.

Meanwhile, Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff inspected the hatch seals of the station’s labs and checked out the communication equipment in the docked Soyuz TMA-12 spacecraft. During the spacewalks, the station’s hatches will be sealed and Chamitoff will remain in the Soyuz as a contingency in the unlikely event that the spacewalkers are unable to repressurize the Pirs docking compartment and must use the Soyuz to move to another docking port to re-enter the station.

Volkov and Kononenko are set to exit the station Thursday at about 2:20 p.m. EDT. During the 6-hour excursion, they will inspect the Soyuz, checking the attachment of the return module to the propulsion module. They also will retrieve a suspect pyrotechnic bolt for inspection by engineers on the ground.

If time permits, the spacewalkers will install a docking target on the Zvezda service module. Otherwise, they will complete that task on a second spacewalk on July 15. On that spacewalk they also will retrieve an experiment from the station’s exterior and install another.
 

C3PO

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The footrest on the strela boom has failed to work, so they will be improvising.

EDIT: It's more then a little unsettling watching them hack away on the thermal blankets.
 
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C3PO

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The pyro bolt has been removed, and placed in the blast proof canister.

An EVA is exiting enough, even if you're not working with explosives. :)
 

Chupacabra

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Haha, I was thinking the same. Especially when they are both dangling from the boom, with a serrated knife out, and cutting into the ship that they are supposed to ride back in on to retrieve an explosive bolt. :)

It's interesting how much had to be improvised considering that A)Hasn't been done. and B)Hasn't been rehearsed as much as the STS EVAs.
 

C3PO

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Haha, I was thinking the same. Especially when they are both dangling from the boom, with a serrated knife out, and cutting into the ship that they are supposed to ride back in on to retrieve an explosive bolt. :)

It's interesting how much had to be improvised considering that A)Hasn't been done. and B)Hasn't been rehearsed as much as the STS EVAs.
Yeah. The Russians sure do have a different 'style' then NASA.
 

DaveS

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Yeah. The Russians sure do have a different 'style' then NASA.
Not really. This is a non-practiced Russian EVA. NASA has alot of experience with conducting non-pre-planned EVAs, both during shuttle missions and stage EVAs.

Some examples:
-Stephen Robinson removing two potruding gap-fillers from Discovery during the STS-114 mission. No training, procedures developed in a few days during the mission.

-P6 Solar Array Wing troubles during STS-116/12A.1. Had to use a make-shift EVA with procedures that hand been developed in a period of 3 days!

-S4 Beta Gimbal Assembly Bearing Roll Ring Motor swap-out by Peggy Whitson and Dan Tani during Expedition 16. This was developed from procedures that been collecting dust since the launch of P6 in Dec. 2000!
No training for that on the ground by either Whitson or Tani, yet they did it with no issues whatsoever.

-P6 4B SAW repair by Scott Parazynski during the STS-120/10A mission, no practice for him on ground for this EVA task!

That's just ome of the many contigency tasks that have been done by US astronauts since Return To Flight.
 

tl8

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Are there windows on the ISS and where are they located?
 

DaveS

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Are there windows on the ISS and where are they located?
Yes. Plenty, but most are located in the Russian segment. There's two on the JPM, one in Destiny about 6-9(unsure of the exact number) windows in Zvezda and two in Pirs.
 

tblaxland

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Yes. Plenty, but most are located in the Russian segment. There's two on the JPM, one in Destiny about 6-9(unsure of the exact number) windows in Zvezda and two in Pirs.
The two on the JPM are located on the port end cap. The one in Destiny is located on the nadir side.

The Cupola will add another seven windows to the US segment:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupola_(ISS)
 

tblaxland

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Russian Spacewalk Concludes

Bill Harwood's story here:
http://spaceflightnow.com/station/exp17/080710eva/index4.html

"Sergei, I forgot to congratulate you. Now you're a full-blown crew commander," a Russian flight controller joked in a radio call just before the spacewalk ended. "And you gear, you have a handgun, you have a grenade, next time you'll have your own test site.
Fuel on James Oberg's fire? (BTW, the grenade they are referring to is the pyrobolt)
 

Chipstone306

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Light-Duty Day for Crew After Successful Spacewalk

Image above: Commander Sergei Volkov (right) and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko conduct a spacewalk on July 15, 2008. Credit: NASA TV

Following a successful spacewalk Tuesday, the Expedition 17 crew members aboard the International Space Station had a light-duty work day Wednesday.

Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko recharged the batteries for their Russian Orlan suits and stowed spacewalking tools and equipment.

The cosmonauts also reconfigured laptops and conducted a debriefing with Russian spacewalk specialists on Earth.

Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff reopened the hatches to the Columbus and Kibo modules.

Tuesday’s 5-hour, 54-minute spacewalk was Volkov and Kononenko’s second in less than a week. They continued to outfit the station's exterior as they retrieved and installed experiments and added a docking target on the Zvezda service module. The target will help with the docking of a Russian mini research module on the space-facing side of Zvezda. That module will be launched next year.
 

Chipstone306

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Diagnostic Activities and Solar Eclipse Passes for the Station

Image above: Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff sets up an experiment inside the Destiny lab’s Microgravity Science Glovebox. Credit: NASA TV

The International Space Station’s treadmill has been taken offline due to a torn belt. With no spare belt on board, experts are reviewing further diagnostics for the exercise device.

Ground controllers also are performing a diagnostic study of snare cables in the Latching End Effector (LEE) of the station’s robotic arm. The LEE is the robotic arm’s hand which attaches to grapple fixtures on the station. The snares have experienced “stickiness” when closing around the grapple fixtures in the past. Photographs and video will be taken of the snare cables to assist with the investigation.

On Friday, the space complex passed through the moon’s shadow twice as a solar eclipse moved from Canada to China. Though the Expedition 17 crew was unable to see the moon’s shadow during both passes the station’s solar arrays temporarily lost some power generation abilities.

Meanwhile, Commander Sergei Volkov and flight engineers Oleg Kononenko and Greg Chamitoff continue science and maintenance activities.
 

Chipstone306

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Crew Continues Maintenance, Science; Ground Controllers Test Dextre

Image above: A view of Tropical Storm Edouard from Expedition 17 Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff on the International Space Station. NASA's Johnson Space Center is closed due to the storm. Credit: NASA
› More Photos

Dextre was in the spotlight Monday aboard the International Space Station.

For the first time since the station’s Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator was assembled and activated during STS-123 in March, controllers on the ground began a comprehensive series of tests on the Canadian-built robotic system, also known as Dextre. Controllers tested one of the system’s shoulder roll joints Monday.

Expedition 17 Commander Sergei Volkov worked to replace an electronics box used to power the orientation of the solar arrays on the Zvezda Service Module.

In the complex’s Russian Segment, Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko performed maintenance on the purification system in the Elektron oxygen generator.

Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff installed and checked out a laptop computer for the Kibo module’s Ryutai rack, which houses fluids physics and material sciences experiments. He also installed additional hardware for the Clean Bench in Kibo’s Saibo rack, a type of glovebox that provides a germ-free environment for biological experiments.

Ground teams continue to analyze the results of Friday’s inspection of the treadmill aboard the International Space Station by Expedition 17 crew members. The crew found a one-inch tear on the outside edge of the exercise device’s belt.

NASA'S Johnson Space Center will be closed from noon Monday through Tuesday due to the approach of Tropical Storm Edouard, which is predicted to cross the Texas coast early Tuesday. Plans call for the center to reopen Wednesday. JSC's Mission Control Center will remain open during the center closure.
 

Chipstone306

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Station Crew Caps Busy Week with Commissioning of Kibo Robotic Arm

Image above: Expedition 17 Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff talks with students from the Outer Space Base science program of the Pima County Public Library in Tuscon, Ariz. Credit: NASA TV

International Space Station Expedition 17 Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff began the commissioning of the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm Friday, capping a busy work week. They tested the arm's joints, end effector and software through extensive commanding and maneuvering of the arm's components. The tests were successful and the arm is functioning properly.

Volkov also photographed a tropical wave over Puerto Rico as part of ongoing Earth observation from the station. The focus of Earth observation is documenting climate and environmental change of the planet.

The commander also spent time working with the PNEUMOCARD experiment. This experiment is an integrated study of the cardiovascular systems of crew members in various phases of long durations in space.

The crew members continued packing discarded items into the ISS Progress 29 cargo ship throughout the week. It is scheduled to undock from the station on Sept. 2, then deorbit and burn up in the Earth's atmosphere.

Two of the four main engines of the European Space Agency’s “Jules Verne” Automated Transfer Vehicle fired for 16 minutes and 32 seconds Wednesday in the third of a series of four planned reboosts of the station. The reboosts will adjust the station’s orbit to prepare it for the launches this fall of the Progress 30 cargo ship and the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft carrying the Expedition 18 crew.
 

Chipstone306

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Station Performs Maneuver; Science and Cargo Transfer Continues

Image above: A view of Cape Farewell, Greenland, photographed by an Expedition 17 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Two of the four of the Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) engines fired for five minutes and two seconds Wednesday to avoid any possibility of the International Space Station coming too close to a spent Russian rocket. The successful maneuver began about 12:10 p.m. EDT.

Meanwhile, the Expedition 17 crew members aboard the station worked with science experiments and continued the transfer of cargo.

Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko conducted a status check on the PLANTS-2 experiment that researches the growth and development of plants in microgravity. He'd harvested and replanted in that experiment on Monday.

Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff performed maintenance on the station’s stationary bicycle. The cycle is one of several exercise devices crew members use to help counteract the effects of long-term exposure to weightlessness in space.

The crew members also continued to unload cargo from the ATV and stowed station trash in it. The ATV is set to undock from the station in September and burn in the Earth’s atmosphere.


-----Posted Added-----


Inspections, Exercise and ATV Preps for Station Crew

Image above: Commander Sergei Volkov works on the station’s treadmill in the Zvezda service module. Credit: NASA

Expedition 17 Commander Sergei Volkov inspected windows in the International Space Station’s Russian segment for flaws. Volkov photographed the windows to compare their condition with photos from previous missions and document any new defects such as scratches and discoloration. The photographs will be downlinked to the ground for review.

Volkov and station flight engineers Oleg Kononenko and Greg Chamitoff continue their exercise routines with sessions on the station’s treadmill and Resistive Exercise Device. The exercises, using several devices, are aimed at countering effects of lengthy spaceflight.

Chamitoff talked with the Australian Broadcasting Corp. for its Catalyst science program. Australian participants, who included students from Sydney Girls High School, were at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney. Its Seeds in Space project was among topics discussed.

Europe’s Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) is being loaded with trash and discarded items before leaving the station Sept. 5. The ATV is undergoing final preparations before it undocks from the Zvezda service module and re-enters Earth’s atmosphere to burn up over the Pacific Ocean.

The Progress 29 unpiloted cargo carrier is scheduled to undock from the station with its load of discards Sept. 1. A new unpiloted cargo carrier, the Progress 30, is scheduled to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Sept. 10.
 

Chipstone306

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Crew Wraps Up Busy Week, Progress to Undock

Image above: Greg Chamitoff works with the Microgravity Science Glovebox in the Columbus laboratory on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

The Expedition 17 crew members made last minute equipment transfers in the ISS Progress 29 cargo craft before they closed its hatches for the final time Friday.

The Progress, filled with trash and unneeded items, is scheduled to undock from the Earth-facing port of the Zarya module Monday, Sept. 1. The craft will be deorbited a week later to burn up in the Earth's atmosphere. A new unpiloted cargo craft, the Progress 30, is scheduled to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Sept. 10.

Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff collected coolant samples from the Japanese Experiment Module and took water samples in the Columbus module. He also recorded medical data collected during a test using the Portable Clinical Blood Analyzer (PCBA).

Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko unloaded cargo and stowed station trash in the Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). Earlier this week, crew members tested the station’s manual TORU docking system to prepare for the ATV’s undocking Sept. 5. It would be used in the unlikely event of a failure of the automated Kurs docking system.

Crew members continued their work with various science experiments. They also performed their daily exercise sessions to counteract the effects of long-term exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Aside from their regular off-duty time, crew members will stay occupied over the holiday weekend with ongoing science experiments and regular station maintenance activities.
 

Chipstone306

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Crew Continues Preparing ATV for Undocking

Image above: Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff works in the Kibo laboratory on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

The Expedition 17 crew of the International Space Station continued to prepare the Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) for its undocking Friday.

The crew readied and tested the ATV’s proximity communications equipment Wednesday in preparation for its undocking from the aft port of the Zvezda service module. The Jules Verne delivered more than 7,500 pounds of equipment, supplies, water, fuel and gases when it arrived at the orbiting complex on April 3.

Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff worked with plumbing for the new Water Recovery System (WRS) that will recycle wastewater into drinkable water. Equipment for the new WRS is scheduled to fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour on STS-126 in November.

Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko took photographs while working with the PLANTS-2 experiment that researches the growth and development of plants in microgravity.

Kononenko also conducted a computer virus scan on the station’s crew support computers.

Additionally, the crew members took routine body mass measurements as they conducted their daily physical exercise routines to counteract the effects of long-term exposure to weightlessness in space.
 

Chipstone306

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Jules Verne to Undock Friday

Image above: Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff and Commander Sergei Volkov relocate an experiment rack in the Kibo laboratory. Credit: NASA

The Expedition 17 crew members made last minute equipment transfers and final preparations in the Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) before they closed its hatches for the final time Thursday.

The ATV, filled with trash and unneeded items, is scheduled to undock from the aft port of the Zvezda service module on Friday about 5:30 p.m. EDT. Once undocked, it will remain in a parking orbit until it is deorbited to burn up in the Earth's atmosphere later this month.

The ATV arrived at the station on April 3, bringing with it more than 7,500 pounds of equipment, supplies, water, fuel, and gases as well as an increased propulsion capacity.

Crew members continued to conduct virus scans and routine maintenance activities on some of the station’s computers. They also performed their daily exercise sessions to counteract the effects of long-term exposure to the microgravity of space.
 
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