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GLS

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Trash from the International Space Station may have hit a house in Florida​

debris1-800x600.jpeg

A Nest home security camera captured the sound of the crash at 2:34 pm local time (19:34 UTC) on March 8. That's an important piece of information because it is a close match for the time—2:29 pm EST (19:29 UTC)—that US Space Command recorded the reentry of a piece of space debris from the space station. At that time, the object was on a path over the Gulf of Mexico, heading toward southwest Florida.

https://arstechnica.com/space/2024/...pace-station-may-have-hit-a-house-in-florida/
 

Donamy

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The sky is falling.
 

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GLS

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oh boy 🤦‍♂️

As leaks on the space station worsen, there’s no clear plan to deal with them​

https://arstechnica.com/space/2024/06/on-the-space-station-band-aid-fixes-for-systemic-problems/


After the leak rate doubled early this year during a two-week period, the Russians experimented with keeping the hatch leading to the PrK module closed intermittently and performed other investigations. But none of these measures taken during the spring worked.

The space agency often uses a 5x5 "risk matrix" to classify the likelihood and consequence of risks to spaceflight activities, and the Russian leaks are now classified as a "5" both in terms of high likelihood and high consequence. Their potential for "catastrophic failure" is discussed in meetings.

The ISS program is currently managed by Dana Weigel, a former flight director. She recently replaced Joel Montalbano, who became deputy associate administrator for the agency’s Space Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

One source familiar with NASA's efforts to address the leaks confirmed to Ars that the internal concerns about the issue are serious. "We heard that basically the program office had a runaway fire on their hands and were working to solve it," this person said. "Joel and Dana are keeping a lid on this."

US officials are likely remaining quiet about their concerns because they don't want to embarrass their Russian partners.




The "PrK module" is a sort of airlock at the aft end of Zvezda, between the main volume and the docking port.
 

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I wonder how feasible it would be to bring down at least parts of it back to Earth intact. Maybe some heat shield module using the docking port? The shuttle is now long gone, but perhaps Starship could grab a few if it is functional by then?
 

GLS

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I wonder how feasible it would be to bring down at least parts of it back to Earth intact. Maybe some heat shield module using the docking port? The shuttle is now long gone, but perhaps Starship could grab a few if it is functional by then?
Well, it is very unlikely that the solar arrays can close properly, so those are out, and that excludes the rest of the truss.
As far as modules go, you could think about the Node 2 and 3, ESA and Japan Labs, PMM and the Joint Airlock (some imply also returning others). A cradle would have to be built, with the shuttle latches to hold the modules.
All this assuming that it fits inside Starship... all that it can stand the loads of the landing flip... and also that Starship can land with the resulting mass and cg... and also Starship is allowed near the ISS, can dock and get the module maneuvered into place.

Not easy, but yeah, it would be cool to have something of the actual ISS to see in a museum.
 
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