Updates Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV)

Urwumpe

Not funny anymore
Addon Developer
Donator
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
36,348
Reaction score
844
Points
203
Location
Langendernbach
Lift-off was good, trajectory after third stage separation is good...

---------- Post added at 03:05 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:54 PM ----------

IXV has separated from the AVUM in 340 km altitude and Libreville station has picked up the signal.
 

GLS

Well-known member
Orbiter Contributor
Addon Developer
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
4,539
Reaction score
751
Points
138
78Km altitude and it's slowing down

---------- Post added at 03:00 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:53 PM ----------

2 minutes to ship AOS

---------- Post added at 03:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:00 PM ----------

AOS, all is well!

---------- Post added at 03:09 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:01 PM ----------

Main parachute deployed!

---------- Post added at 03:19 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:09 PM ----------

Splashdown!
 

Scruce

Ad astra per aspera
Joined
Sep 17, 2010
Messages
1,410
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Any news on the AVUM upper stage?
 

Galactic Penguin SST

Geek Penguin in GTO
News Reporter
Donator
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
3,669
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Hong Kong
Any news on the AVUM upper stage?

Already de-orbited. Now the question is - did it actually enter a Low Earth Orbit for 1 orbit, and thus qualifying this as an "orbital launch" despite IXV launched onto a "trans-atmospheric" trajectory? :hmm:
 

kuddel

Donator
Donator
Joined
Apr 1, 2008
Messages
1,775
Reaction score
277
Points
83
IXV floating and waiting for recovery

Pics from esa

IXV_floating_and_waiting_for_recovery_node_full_image_2.jpg


IXV_floating_and_waiting_for_recovery_node_full_image_2.jpg


IXV_floating_and_waiting_for_recovery_node_full_image_2.jpg


IXV_floating_and_waiting_for_recovery_node_full_image_2.jpg
 

ISProgram

SketchUp Orbinaut
Joined
Feb 5, 2014
Messages
750
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Ominke Atoll
Already de-orbited. Now the question is - did it actually enter a Low Earth Orbit for 1 orbit, and thus qualifying this as an "orbital launch" despite IXV launched onto a "trans-atmospheric" trajectory? :hmm:

I think it reentered the telemetry FOV of the Kourou ground station (so one orbital lap) and then deorbited.

The Arianespace webcast actually mentions that it's intended to enter orbit, then deorbit, as to not touchdown near the targeted LZ for the IXV.
 

Astro SG Wise

Future Orion MPCV Pilot
Joined
May 26, 2014
Messages
489
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Website
www.aesd.blogspot.com
Could a human, if given right conditions, have survived in that vehicle? Looks like a fast jump for ESA to a manned spacecraft.
 

PhantomCruiser

Wanderer
Moderator
Tutorial Publisher
Joined
Jan 23, 2009
Messages
5,501
Reaction score
27
Points
138
Location
Cleveland
A human might have been a bit squished by how fast that Vega jumped off the pad. I'd like to see the G-load it took.
 

Urwumpe

Not funny anymore
Addon Developer
Donator
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
36,348
Reaction score
844
Points
203
Location
Langendernbach
A human might have been a bit squished by how fast that Vega jumped off the pad. I'd like to see the G-load it took.

Not that much higher than normal launches. The rocket is just pretty small, thus the 15 initial to 25 m/s² later acceleration appears higher than it really is.
 

PhantomCruiser

Wanderer
Moderator
Tutorial Publisher
Joined
Jan 23, 2009
Messages
5,501
Reaction score
27
Points
138
Location
Cleveland
Yeah. I was just checking out the size of the thing, it's smaller than I thought it was.

not meant to be "that's what she said" worthy, but..
 

RGClark

Mathematician
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
1,635
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Philadelphia
Website
exoscientist.blogspot.com
Congrats to the ESA on the successful launch and recovery.
Just saw this:

ESA re-entry vehicle could pave way for reusable launcher.
Posted on February 10, 2015 by Stephen Clark
http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/02/10/esa-re-entry-vehicle-could-pave-way-for-reusable-launcher/

It doesn't specifically say it could be used for manned launches, but with the discussion in the article of "spaceplanes" I gather that would be an application. It's too small to serve as a manned spacecraft now, though perhaps a single, sitting crew man could fit in the wider rear portion of the craft.
Scaled up, say, by a factor of 2 might make it work as a manned craft.

Bob Clark
 
Top