How to make a rocket that flies.

Artlav

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But now i am thinking to make a rocket which flies. what things should it require.
Before giving you the answer, one question please:
Have you already tried to do it? Attempted to solve it yourself?
 

Dickie

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You can buy off the shelf flying model shuttle kits, I know I had one by Estes years ago. It may have been my model making skill but I do seem to remember it wasn't terribly successful as a glider and came back to Earth in a similar manner to a brick!

A quick Google turned up these (if you can get them in the UK, I'd imagine they're easily available in the USA):

http://www.modelrockets.co.uk/shop/product_info.php?products_id=2274

http://www.modelrockets.co.uk/shop/product_info.php?products_id=1979
 

Jarvitä

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I have already created a model space shuttle, But now i am thinking to make a rocket which flies. what things should it require.

A model rocket engine would be a good start. Failing that, a spring- or manual operated ejection system might do the job for some interpretations of "flying".
 

T.Neo

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what things should it require.

Many rockets require highly reactive and flammable substances. Do take care.

If you want to make a flyable rocket, I suggest starting with a kit. I've had little experiance with model rockets, but I've tried to build many models from scratch and it wasn't really a pleasant experiance.

Once again, I'd like to warn everyone that flammable chemicals or other volatile substances must be handled with respect at all times.
 

RocketMan_Len

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You're asking a VERY open-ended question... keep in mind that building static models is *way* different from building flying models.

I'm going to assume that you have ZERO experience in building flying rockets...

Step 1 - find a rocketry club close to where you live. Check out the websites for the National Association of Rocketry (since your stats say you're American...) or the Tripoli Rocketry Association. They can get you pointed in the right direction. A club will give you access to experienced fliers, who can help you out if you have problems... as well as giving you access to a field to fly in, and insurance coverage if things go severely wrong.

Step 2 - Buy and build a few kits first. An Estes 'Starter Kit' will provide you with not only the rocket itself, but the ground equipment (launchpad, ignition system, etc...) that you need to fly it a few times. Until you have a fair idea of why the parts are assembled the way they are, DO NOT attempt to modify the kit - follow the instructions EXACTLY.

Step 3 - Once you're comfortable with building and flying kits, you'll be in a good position to start designing your own. As has been pointed out, RocSim is a good design program and learning tool... however, a design program isn't totally necessary - it just takes care of the math involved in getting the stability right.

Step 4 - Don't Be Intimidated. When you start flying with a club, there will be several people flying larger and more complex rockets than you are. Don't let that discourage you - those folks will have been building their own designs for years... but they all will have started out in exactly the same way you are. Don't be afraid to ask them questions... but be aware that there are times when you don't want to distract someone going through a detailed checklist. ;)

Good Luck...
 

Hielor

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You are wrong, i have made eight rockets before, five of them were made by rc plane engines, two of them were made by a cracker rocket & left 1 is just a model

6 rockets crashed badly, left 2 are with me.

Get an Estes starter kit. Follow the directions.
 

Urwumpe

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You are wrong, i have made eight rockets before, five of them were made by rc plane engines, two of them were made by a cracker rocket & left 1 is just a model

6 rockets crashed badly, left 2 are with me.

I made rocket augmented paper planes, but I did not consider this anything more than a funny experiment and "flying" was not the right term for it. It was some sort of a cruel execution of innocent paper.

Get a simple beginners kit. It won't harm your ego, if you get too easy successes with it. After that, you can always go bigger.
 

RocketMan_Len

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You are wrong, i have made eight rockets before, five of them were made by rc plane engines, two of them were made by a cracker rocket & left 1 is just a model

6 rockets crashed badly, left 2 are with me.

My advice still stands - find a club, buy some kits, and work your way from there.
 

StarLost

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My Toronto compatriot has excellent advice. Also, other than just building a flyable model of the Shuttle stack, you must look into local regulations pertaining to where flights are allowable and the limits to engine size.

Since you will be dealing with explosives, one way or another, or by degree, in this day and age you do not want to run afoul of relevant authorities on the matter.

Join a club. They well help you with the relevant education ... and probably insurance.
 

RisingFury

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You can build your own rocket engine if you know what you're doing. You can use ground up sugar as fuel and ground up K2NO3 - potassium nitrate - as oxidizer.

A group managed getting a rocket to beyond 100 km altitude using sugar propellant.
http://sugarshot.org/
 

StarLost

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You can build your own rocket engine if you know what you're doing. You can use ground up sugar as fuel and ground up K2NO3 - potassium nitrate - as oxidizer.

A group managed getting a rocket to beyond 100 km altitude using sugar propellant.
http://sugarshot.org/

Please be wary of offering this kind of advice. In many places making your own rocket engines, or anything that has explosive potential, is now illegal, as is offering up directions as to how to make same.

You must have the proper permits.
 

Bj

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As far as I know, any engine with an impulse of 320 or more is considered 'High Powered' and needs a permit... But once you start making high powered rockets, it's often a headache for you to get all those permits. (If you where smart, (and if you where legal and safe) you will get a G powered engine, and you would just build a rocket that has a really small overall mass so that it actually reaches higher with less fuel.;) Once you get as low weight as possible, try to get the most aerodynamic, which will get higher still.


www.nar.org said:
How do I get started in High Power Rocketry?
The NAR offers a three tier certification program for adult members who wish to build and fly High Power rockets. Membership in the NAR empowers you to apply for HPR certification and NAR High Power certification is free to all adult NAR members. In addition, we offer a Junior HPR Participation Program for junior members from age 14 through 17 who would like to participate in High Power rocketry. Moreover, we have a Trained Safety Officer program, which is designed to assist individuals in performing safety officer functions on a High Power rocket range. We also have a complete set of technical reports regarding High Power rocketry topics. Simply choose one of the following links of interest for detailed information, procedures and application forms regarding our HPR services.
HPR Level 1 Certification Procedure
HPR Level 2 Certification Procedure
HPR Level 2 Written Exam Study Guide
HPR Level 3 Certification Procedure
Junior HPR Participation Program Procedure
HPR FAA Waiver Filing Procedure
Trained Safety Officer Program
High Power Rocketry Safety Code
HPR Level 1 and Level 2 High Power Certification Application
HPR Level 3 High Power Certification Application
Junior HPR Participation Program Application
HPR Reports and Documents


Note: PVC tubes are just polyvinyl chloride which melts at 100*C, I am sure it would be easy to shape at 80-90*C.

In my own opinion, making and designing the rocket itself would be more fun and challenging. It would definitely less hazardous than making your own fuel. Especially when it is cheaper to buy G rated engines.
 

StarLost

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Bj, excellent information!

Here is some food for thought, in the same vein, for Canada:

http://www.canadabusiness.ca/servle...C_ON/display&lang=en&cid=1081944205937&c=Regs

http://www.canadianrocketry.org/regs_about.php

http://www.tc.gc.ca/civilaviation/general/LSO/menu.htm

Of course, there is a strong distinction between model rocketry and highpower rocketry. No one should indulge in high power rocketry without first experimenting at the model rocketry level.

And for all considering model rocketry, here is the CAR model rocketry code. I will assume that most countries have similar:

1) CONSTRUCTION. I will always build my model rocket using only lightweight materials such as paper, wood, plastics or rubber without any metal airframe components. My model shall include aerodynamic surfaces or a mechanism to assure a safe, stable flight. 2) MOTORS. I will only use rocket motors and reloads approved by Natural Resources Canada, Explosives Regulatory Division (NRC/ERD). I will store these motors in a safe and secure manner as described by the manufacturer and NRC/ERD. I will never subject these motors to excessive shock or extremes of temperature. I will not attempt to use, alter, or reload commercial rocket motors, except as instructed by the manufacturer.
3) RECOVERY. My model rocket will always use a recovery system to return it safely to the ground so that my model rocket may be reflown. I shall prepare the recovery system with due care to assure that it will properly deploy.
4) WEIGHT LIMITS. My model rocket will not weigh more than 1500 grams at lift-off, and the model rocket engine(s) will contain no more than 125 grams of propellant and produce no more than 160 N-s combined total-impulse.
5) FIRING SYSTEM. I will always use a remote electrical system to ignite the model rocket engine(s). My firing system will include an ignition switch that returns to "off" when released, and a safety interlock to prevent accidental ignition. I will never leave the safety interlock key in my firing system between launches.
6) LAUNCH SYSTEM. My model rocket will always be launched from a stable platform having a device to initially guide its motion. My launcher will have a jet deflector to prevent motor exhaust from directly contacting the ground. To protect myself and other from eye injury, I will position the launch rod or rail so that the upper end is above eye level, or else I will place a large guard on the upper end between launches.
7) LAUNCH SITE. I will never launch my model rockets near buildings or power lines, into clouds, or become a hazard to aviation. The area immediately around the launch system will be cleared of any flammable materials. I will always obtain the permission of the launch site owner prior to using the launch site for my model rocket activities.
8) LAUNCH CONDITIONS. I will never launch model rockets in high winds or in conditions of low visibility which may impair the observation of my model rocket in flight, or in a direction below 30 degrees from the vertical.
9) LAUNCH SAFETY. I will remain at least 5 metres away from any model about to be launched. I will always announce to persons within the launch site that I am about to launch my model rocket, and I shall give a loud countdown of at least 5 seconds duration. I shall immediately remove the safety interlock key from my firing system after the launch of my model rocket.
10) MISFIRES. In the event of an ignition misfire, I shall not immediately approach my model rocket, but remove the safety interlock key and remain back for a safe period until assured that no ignition will occur.
11) ANIMAL PAYLOADS. I will never endanger live animals by launching them in my model rocket.
12) TARGETS. I will never launch my rocket so that it will fall on, or strike, ground or air targets. Nor will I include any explosive or incendiary payload.
13) HAZARDOUS RECOVERY. I will never attempt to recover my model rocket from a power line, high place, a tree, or other dangerous location.
14) PRE FLIGHT TESTS. Whenever possible, I will always test the stability, operation and reliability of my model rocket designs prior to flight. I will launch unproven designs in complete isolation from other persons.
15) PERSONAL CONDUCT. I will always conduct myself in a responsible manner, conscious that the maintenance of safety for myself and other rests with my ability to design and construct sound working models, and to enthusiastically abide by the CAR Model Rocket Safety Code.

Copyright 2009 - The Canadian Association of Rocketry
 

garyw

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