General Question DeltagliderIV Autopilot Help

johndeere5

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I'm using the DeltagliderIV, when I go into space using the AP, and once in stable orbit and near ISS, I use the AP docking, now heres the question, what frequency is ISS docking for DGIV and where can I find ISS frequencies for other spacecrafts that dock into their own port?
 

dbeachy1

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1. Press CTRL-I to bring up the 'Object Info' dialog.
2. Select 'Vessel' in the left-hand drop-down.
3. Now select 'ISS' in the right-hand drop-down.
4. Scroll the window down to where it says, 'Docking port status'. That section shows the IDS frequency of each docking port. [You can also see the XPDR (transponder) frequency at the top of the window.]

When you're done, just close the object info dialog by clicking the red X.
 

Pablo49

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The IDS frequencies for the ISS are in the Orbiter manual. You can also check/set IDS frequencies via the scenario editor.
 

johndeere5

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Thank you for your help on this. I looked in the Orbiter Manual and didn't find the frequency, if it's there then somehow I miss it, thanks.
 

johndeere5

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I found the frequency and set to it, but the DGIV AP monitor says no signal or set NAV1 to docking signal, which I already did and tried several variation of different docking port signals, it won't lock for the interception then dock, I'm not sure what's wrong, am I too far or what, from the look on the MFD Map, a rough estimate on the distant that I will tell you is before launch, the ISS is exactly on the California coastline, and after safe parking orbit, the ISS is almost over my head, but just behind be, oh say, what, 100-200 miles, may be less, can't tell on the map to judge it, any help on how to get the frequency to work and how to get the AP auto dock to intercept and dock? Thanks.
 

lennartsmit

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If i were you i wouldn't try to do everything by autopilot. Just try some tutorials around here. For the auto-docking to work you have to be within 100km of the ISS. You can see your distance in the align plane MFD.
 

PhantomCruiser

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Have you taken a look at the tutorial video by Tex? http://www.megaupload.com/?d=AMUQBOMZ
I could dock already before I watched it, but it helped me tremendously with my fuel usage. Also if you haven't got "Go Play In Space" yet, you really need to get it. It'll help.
 

Tommy

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The DGIV's docking AP will only work if you are within 50k of the target, and have a low relative velocity. You need to align your planes and sync orbit's before you can use it.


While the DGIV's autopilots are handy, they won't fly the entire journey for you. Each does one task, and one task only. The ascent AP will get you from the surface to a stable parking orbit, and no more. The docking AP will dock your vessel - if your orbit very closely matches the target's, and you are close enough, but it won't align your planes and rendevous. The fully auto re-entry AP will get you through the higher atmosphere and reduce your velocity, but it won't de-orbit and it doesn't care where exactly you want to land.

Even with autopilots, a basic understanding of Orbital Mechanics and Operations is required to use them correctly and effectively. A good place to start is with the annotated recordings contained in the "Tutorials" folder in the scenario list. The above mentioned "Go Play in Space" is also excellent, and expands on the flight recordings. There are also dozens of other good tutorials - some written, some flight recordings, and some video, available.

I'm not trying to be rude or dismissive, but there are no magic shortcuts to Orbiter - it is real physics, and an understanding of those physics (as well as the methods used to apply those physics) is essential. It's quite likely that many of these tutorials won't make much sense at first, so read them, try it yourself, read them again, etc, until it becomes reasonably clear. That's what I did, and the same is true for almost everyone here. Expect dozens of failures before success is attained.
 
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