Updates DARPA's ALASA Program

Scruce

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DARPA's Airborne Launch Assist Space Access (ALASA) program will attempt to provide the capability to launch a 100 lb satellite into space within a 24 hour notice period for less than $1,000,000. At least 12 orbital test flights are planned for 2016. Here is their press release.

 
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Quick_Nick

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"Perhaps the most daring technology ALASA seeks to implement is a new high-energy monopropellant"

Pretty daring and pretty cool stuff!
 

Galactic Penguin SST

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Well there are 2 things that I doubt will happen as planned:

1. Like most other projects I doubt the first flight will happen this year or that they can fly 12 times by next year. There's a ground based rocket that is being developed by Aerojet and USAF ORS targeting the same requirements that should have flown by now from Hawaii, but has yet to happen.

2. Could they really hit the cost target? Keep in mind that while this caters more to the military, there are many small satellite launcher concepts out there right now (VG's LauncherOne, Firefly, Generation Orbit....) and I doubt most can even reach the flying stage. Also remember that the one air-launch concept that did flown had a much larger flight rate projected in the past. ;)

So....yeah let's see what will happen. :rolleyes:
 

fsci123

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The next step is developing a mass produceable satellite bus. Probably similar to the cubesat model except a lot cheaper.
 

ISProgram

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The launch vehicle itself will probably be the limiting factor for operational flights, because of production time/costs.

A fighter jet, on the other hand...there are a lot of them, so it shouldn't be.
 

boogabooga

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What useful payload needs to be launched in 24 hours and weighs less than 100 pounds?

All the NRO toys seem to be launched on the big birds.

Since when has a cubesat been needed to be launched in an emergency?
 

Star Voyager

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If there's no satellites scheduled to be over a certain target, maybe they can fill the gap with the little ones.
 

MaverickSawyer

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If there's no satellites scheduled to be over a certain target, maybe they can fill the gap with the little ones.

They're trying to fill the role of the SR-71: rapid reaction times, unpredictable routes, and lower cost than the larger, more permanent satellites.
 

fsci123

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What useful payload needs to be launched in 24 hours and weighs less than 100 pounds?

All the NRO toys seem to be launched on the big birds.

Since when has a cubesat been needed to be launched in an emergency?

Wasn't there a program to develop a satellite that can be launched into orbit for "temporary battlefield awareness". Some sort of disposable reconissance/communication probe.

---------- Post added at 03:59 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:58 PM ----------

Haha I found the link: http://www.raytheon.com/news/feature/rms13_seeme.html
 

ISProgram

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The ALASA LV configuration is kind of interesting. I keep thinking "Orion LAS" when I look at it. Why could those nozzles be in front, rather than at the aft, of that rocket?
 
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Astro SG Wise

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I've tried flying F-15C just like that in a combat sim I have, straight up. I always end up stalling. :lol:. looks like a good idea!
 

Loru

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The ALASA LV configuration is kind of interesting. I keep thinking "Orion LAS" when I look at it. Why could those nozzles be in front, rather than at the aft, of that rocket?

That's more stable configuration - with center of mass behind thrust inertia keeps your trajectory straight.
 

statickid

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Welll....in THAT video I think the ground facing telescope is pretty clear as payload
 

Astro SG Wise

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Hey guys, I just tried out some F-15 maneuvering (the jet used in the video), and I was just going to simulate dropping the fuel tank as the external rocket. The simulator used is Lock On. I think that this concept design is a very good idea.

picture.php
 

Hlynkacg

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The ALASA LV configuration is kind of interesting. I keep thinking "Orion LAS" when I look at it. Why could those nozzles be in front, rather than at the aft, of that rocket?

Stability, center of drag is behind the point of thrust.
 

RisingFury

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The rocket itself shouldn't really be a problem. This kind of mission profile was used on the ASM-135 anti-satellite missile.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASM-135_ASAT


The rocket we're talking about here is more capable, yes, but the payload is small and the accelerations get to be very high, which increases efficiency.
 

Astro SG Wise

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Well, how much thrust is necessary? My record in the sim I was using for F-15 (again, the jet in the video) altitude with a vertical angle for rocket deployment was more than 80,000 feet. How high would the jet need to go to get the rocket into orbit?
 

Pipcard

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That's more stable configuration - with center of mass behind thrust inertia keeps your trajectory straight.
What's the difference between that and the [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pendulum_rocket_fallacy"]pendulum rocket fallacy[/ame]?
 
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