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Old 10-31-2016, 02:11 PM   #211
Urwumpe
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Originally Posted by RGClark View Post
 True but the word "cause" is also left out of the translation.

Bob Clark
Yes, because Google can't detect context. it worked that way:

"At which (place called) software error the (place called) crash is exactly, still needs to be clarified."

If you know, those aren't locations, but things, you know "an etwas liegen" applies and it is about causality.

If you assume it is about locations, it is "an einen Ort liegen", which translates poorly to "to be at".

German is really no easy language, especially not for stupid machines.
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Old 10-31-2016, 03:04 PM   #212
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Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 Yes, because Google can't detect context. it worked that way:
"At which (place called) software error the (place called) crash is exactly, still needs to be clarified."
If you know, those aren't locations, but things, you know "an etwas liegen" applies and it is about causality.
If you assume it is about locations, it is "an einen Ort liegen", which translates poorly to "to be at".
German is really no easy language, especially not for stupid machines.
For this example and I think most examples "lies" for the English translation of "liegt" would at least be valid, such as in the example of the meaning of a place instead of a cause.
You have a choice of a fairly good translation that would work in both contexts, or a translation that is good in one, and unworkable in the other.

Bob Clark

Last edited by RGClark; 11-01-2016 at 06:27 AM.
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Old 11-02-2016, 02:24 AM   #213
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Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 Nothing new at this point, the first report by the software developers is expected this week, a final report should come next week. Especially important: Its about two software components, it is no hardware issue.

Should this prove correct, it is a very very bad day for the software developers and their project managers at ESA. A proper test and verification strategy should have caught the bug before launch.
New candidate for most expensive computer bug ever?
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Old 11-02-2016, 10:10 AM   #214
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 New candidate for most expensive computer bug ever?
Not at all... in that record category, we are talking about much more trailing zeros than a Euro-Russian battery powered weather station.
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Old 11-08-2016, 08:33 AM   #215
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-37898565

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Key meeting to weigh Mars crash report
Engineers are close to identifying the cause of the crash that destroyed the Schiaparelli lander on Mars last month.
The European Space Agency’s director general said he expected to have at least an interim report for member states when they meet to discuss future plans in a fortnight’s time.
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Old 11-08-2016, 09:26 AM   #216
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Interesting that they mention "A Schiaparelli mishap report" despite earlier claims that there wasn't really a failure

A successful soft landing would have made it much easier to secure the remaining 300-400 million. Anyway, rant over and let's hope they get it.
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Old 11-18-2016, 10:23 AM   #217
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18 November 2016
The ExoMars orbiter is preparing to make its first scientific observations at Mars during two orbits of the planet starting next week.
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp..._first_science
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:11 PM   #218
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A bit more information at last:

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...makes_progress

The most interesting bits indicate saturation of data from the IMU causing updates to go very wrong later...

Quote:
The parachute deployed normally at an altitude of 12 km and a speed of 1730 km/h. The vehicle’s heatshield, having served its purpose, was released at an altitude of 7.8 km.

As Schiaparelli descended under its parachute, its radar Doppler altimeter functioned correctly and the measurements were included in the guidance, navigation and control system. However, saturation – maximum measurement – of the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) had occurred shortly after the parachute deployment. The IMU measures the rotation rates of the vehicle. Its output was generally as predicted except for this event, which persisted for about one second – longer than would be expected.

When merged into the navigation system, the erroneous information generated an estimated altitude that was negative – that is, below ground level. This in turn successively triggered a premature release of the parachute and the backshell, a brief firing of the braking thrusters and finally activation of the on-ground systems as if Schiaparelli had already landed. In reality, the vehicle was still at an altitude of around 3.7 km.
Very slightly annoying that the radar was working and presumably could have been used directly for height measurements - but I guess the software was building estimates from weighted averages of both sensor methods. Oh well...

Last edited by Ravenous; 11-23-2016 at 05:16 PM.
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Old 11-29-2016, 12:04 PM   #219
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29 November 2016
ESA’s new ExoMars orbiter has tested its suite of instruments in orbit for the first time, hinting at a great potential for future observations.

Arsia Chasmata
The Trace Gas Orbiter, or TGO, a joint endeavour between ESA and Roscosmos, arrived at Mars on 19 October. Its elliptical orbit takes it from 230–310 km above the surface to around 98 000 km every 4.2 days.
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp..._s_new_orbiter

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-38147682

Last edited by Notebook; 11-29-2016 at 05:05 PM.
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Old 12-06-2016, 02:15 PM   #220
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6 December 2016
The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has imaged the martian moon Phobos as part of a second set of test science measurements made since it arrived at the Red Planet on 19 October.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp..._images_Phobos
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Old 12-06-2016, 03:32 PM   #221
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Busy day...

First images taken by the ExoMars orbiter during instrument testing at Mars


http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...s_first_images
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Old 02-08-2017, 08:22 AM   #222
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http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Op...r_Mars_science

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7 February 2017

ESAs latest Mars orbiter has moved itself into a new path on its way to achieving the final orbit for probing the Red Planet.

In January, it conducted a series of crucial manoeuvres, firing its main engine to adjust its orbit around Mars. The three firings shifted its angle of travel with respect to the equator to almost 74 from the 7 of its October arrival.

The change was achieved in three burns on 19, 23 and 27 January, overseen by the mission control team working at ESAs operations centre in Darmstadt, Germany. A final, minor trim was made on 5 February, at the same time lowering the altitude above Mars at closest approach from 250 km to 210 km.
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Old 05-24-2017, 01:26 PM   #223
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More info on the lander.

Esa has completed its investigatio, but I can't figure out
how to put the link here on this smartp hone thing.

If anyone can many thanks n.

Last edited by Notebook; 05-24-2017 at 01:40 PM. Reason: Incompetence
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Old 05-24-2017, 01:43 PM   #224
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N...
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Old 05-24-2017, 01:44 PM   #225
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Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 More info on the lander.

Esa has completed its investigatio, but I can't figure out
how to put the link here on this smartp hone thing.

If anyone can many thanks n.
N...
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