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Old 11-28-2018, 11:41 AM   #91
4throck
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Nasa TV Youtube stream on the large living room TV
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:55 AM   #92
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Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 Bbc news had it live, was also watching nasa feed.
Sky News didn't show it live, but the news team was impressed by the pictures from the rover of the Moon.
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Old 11-28-2018, 10:25 PM   #93
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I watched live on youtube (nasa jpl channel).
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Old 11-28-2018, 10:56 PM   #94
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Did something land on Mars ?
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Old 11-29-2018, 12:06 AM   #95
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 Did something land on Mars ?
It's all relative. Mars may have landed on something...
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Old 11-30-2018, 11:24 AM   #96
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A bit frustrated by the lack of communication regarding the mission's progress.
I know this mission is slow paced, images are secondary, etc, etc.

But a short update about what's happening on each SOL would good.
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Old 11-30-2018, 12:10 PM   #97
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 ...But a short update about what's happening on each SOL would good.
Curiosity Rover Reports spoiled our...curiosity!
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Old 11-30-2018, 02:37 PM   #98
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Agreed.

To be fair I don't how the international participation regarding instruments might affect operations speed.
If you need to pass data around to teams over many different timezones and countries, any decision will take 3 days.
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Old 12-04-2018, 06:41 AM   #99
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Some updates:

Things are going well!


NASA’s InSight spacecraft flipped open the lens cover on its Instrument Context Camera (ICC) on Nov. 30, 2018, and captured this view of Mars. Located below the deck of the InSight lander, the ICC has a fisheye view, creating a curved horizon. Some clumps of dust are still visible on the camera’s lens. One of the spacecraft’s footpads can be seen in the lower right corner. The seismometer’s tether box is in the upper left corner.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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...the vehicle sits slightly tilted (about 4 degrees) in a shallow dust- and sand-filled impact crater known as a "hollow." InSight has been engineered to operate on a surface with an inclination up to 15 degrees.

...

The InSight science team's preliminary assessment of the photographs taken so far of the landing area suggests the area in the immediate vicinity of the lander is populated by only a few rocks. Higher-resolution images are expected to begin arriving over the coming days, after InSight releases the clear-plastic dust covers that kept the optics of the spacecraft's two cameras safe during landing.

Data downlinked from the lander also indicate that during its first full day on Mars, the solar-powered InSight spacecraft generated more electrical power than any previous vehicle on the surface of Mars.

"It is great to get our first 'off-world record' on our very first full day on Mars," said Hoffman. "But even better than the achievement of generating more electricity than any mission before us is what it represents for performing our upcoming engineering tasks. The 4,588 watt-hours we produced during sol 1 means we currently have more than enough juice to perform these tasks and move forward with our science mission."

As visible in this two-frame set of images, NASA’s InSight spacecraft unlatched its robotic arm on Nov. 27, 2018, the day after it landed on Mars.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Source: NASA

Last edited by Nicholas Kang; 12-04-2018 at 06:50 AM. Reason: Added official NASA link
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Old 12-06-2018, 11:34 PM   #100
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She's flexing her arm now!


This image from InSight's robotic-arm mounted Instrument Deployment Camera shows the instruments on the spacecraft's deck, with the Martian surface of Elysium Planitia in the background. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8).

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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New images from NASA's Mars InSight lander show its robotic arm is ready to do some lifting.

With a reach of nearly 6 feet (2 meters), the arm will be used to pick up science instruments from the lander's deck, gently setting them on the Martian surface at Elysium Planitia, the lava plain where InSight touched down on Nov. 26.

But first, the arm will use its Instrument Deployment Camera, located on its elbow, to take photos of the terrain in front of the lander. These images will help mission team members determine where to set InSight's seismometer and heat flow probe — the only instruments ever to be robotically placed on the surface of another planet.

"Today we can see the first glimpses of our workspace," said Bruce Banerdt, the mission's principal investigator at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "By early next week, we'll be imaging it in finer detail and creating a full mosaic."

Another camera, called the Instrument Context Camera, is located under the lander's deck. It will also offer views of the workspace, though the view won't be as pretty.

An image of InSight's robotic arm, with its scoop and stowed grapple, poised above the Martian soil. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8).

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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"We had a protective cover on the Instrument Context Camera, but somehow dust still managed to get onto the lens," said Tom Hoffman of JPL, InSight's project manager. "While this is unfortunate, it will not affect the role of the camera, which is to take images of the area in front of the lander where our instruments will eventually be placed."

Placement is critical, and the team is proceeding with caution. Two to three months could go by before the instruments have been situated and calibrated.

Over the past week and a half, mission engineers have been testing those instruments and spacecraft systems, ensuring they're in working order. A couple instruments are even recording data: a drop in air pressure, possibly caused by a passing dust devil, was detected by the pressure sensor. This, along with a magnetometer and a set of wind and temperature sensors, are part of a package called the Auxiliary Payload Sensor Subsystem, which will collect meteorological data.

More images from InSight's arm were scheduled to come down this past weekend. However, imaging was momentarily interrupted, resuming the following day. During the first few weeks in its new home, InSight has been instructed to be extra careful, so anything unexpected will trigger what's called a fault. Considered routine, it causes the spacecraft to stop what it is doing and ask for help from operators on the ground.

A partial view of the deck of NASA's InSight lander, where it stands on the Martian plains Elysium Planitia. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8).

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Source: NASA
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Old 12-07-2018, 11:54 PM   #101
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And the first ever "sounds" of Martian winds!


One of InSight's 7-foot (2.2 meter) wide solar panels was imaged by the lander's Instrument Deployment Camera, which is fixed to the elbow of its robotic arm.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech












The spectrogram of vibrations (frequency spectrum over time) recorded by two of the three sensors of the short period seismometer on NASAs InSight lander on Mars. This spectrogram shows the first 1,000 seconds, roughly 20 minutes, of InSights first seismic data from the Red Planet. The vibrations of the lander are due to the wind passing over the spacecraft, particularly the large solar arrays. The annotation indicates the 20-second raw sound clip played earlier.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/UKSA/Imperial College London/Oxford


An annotated image of the surface of Mars, taken by the HiRISE camera on NASAs Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) on May 30, 2014. The contrast has been enhanced in this image to better show the region where InSight landed on Nov. 26, 2018. The labels show the approximate position of NASAs InSight lander in Elysium Planitia. Overlaid on top are the direction of the vibrations detected by InSights science instruments. The diagonal lines, faintly seen moving from upper left corner to the lower right corner of the image, show the paths of dust devils on the Martian surface. The vibrations recorded by InSight line up with the direction of the dust devil motion.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Imperial College London


A copy of one of the sensors on NASA InSights seismometer, compared to a 2-euro coin (about 1 inch wide). The short-period seismometer has three of these sensors.

Credits: Imperial College London


This illustration is a still frame from NASA's Experience InSight app (https://eyes.nasa.gov/insight). It shows in blue outline the location of the pressure sensor inlet, tucked inside the Wind and Thermal Shield. The pressure sensor inlet is part of InSight's Auxiliary Payload Sensor Subsystem.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech


This illustration is a frame from NASA's Experience InSight app (https://eyes.nasa.gov/insight) that shows the location of the spacecraft's pressure sensor inlet, after the Wind and Thermal Shield (WTS) has been deployed. (The real InSight spacecraft has not yet deployed its instruments or the WTS.) The pressure sensor inlet is outlined in blue and the WTS (white dome) has been placed over InSight's seismometer on the ground on Mars. The sensor is part of InSight's Auxiliary Payload Sensor Subsystem.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Old 12-12-2018, 03:11 AM   #102
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Nothing important, just a selfie.


This is NASA InSight's first selfie on Mars. It displays the lander's solar panels and deck. On top of the deck are its science instruments, weather sensor booms and UHF antenna. The selfie was taken on Dec. 6, 2018 (Sol 10).

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Quote:
NASA's InSight lander isn't camera-shy. The spacecraft used a camera on its robotic arm to take its first selfie a mosaic made up of 11 images. This is the same imaging process used by NASA's Curiosity rover mission, in which many overlapping pictures are taken and later stitched together. Visible in the selfie are the lander's solar panel and its entire deck, including its science instruments.
But that shows the whole spacecraft on Mars for the first time. Looking good.

A mosaic of the workspace has also been created.


This mosaic, composed of 52 individual images from NASA's InSight lander, shows the workspace where the spacecraft will eventually set its science instruments.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Quote:
Mission team members have also received their first complete look at InSight's "workspace" the approximately 14-by-7-foot (4-by-2-meter) crescent of terrain directly in front of the spacecraft. This image is also a mosaic composed of 52 individual photos.

In the coming weeks, scientists and engineers will go through the painstaking process of deciding where in this workspace the spacecraft's instruments should be placed. They will then command InSight's robotic arm to carefully set the seismometer (called the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure, or SEIS) and heat-flow probe (known as the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package, or HP3) in the chosen locations. Both work best on level ground, and engineers want to avoid setting them on rocks larger than about a half-inch (1.3 cm).

"The near-absence of rocks, hills and holes means it'll be extremely safe for our instruments," said InSight's Principal Investigator Bruce Banerdt of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "This might seem like a pretty plain piece of ground if it weren't on Mars, but we're glad to see that."

InSight's landing team deliberately chose a landing region in Elysium Planitia that is relatively free of rocks. Even so, the landing spot turned out even better than they hoped. The spacecraft sits in what appears to be a nearly rock-free "hollow" a depression created by a meteor impact that later filled with sand. That should make it easier for one of InSight's instruments, the heat-flow probe, to bore down to its goal of 16 feet (5 meters) below the surface.
Source: NASA
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Old 12-14-2018, 04:45 PM   #103
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JPL : Mars InSight Lander Seen in First Images from Space



NASA's InSight spacecraft, its heat shield and its parachute were imaged on Dec. 6 and 11 by the HiRISE camera onboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Quote:
{...}
The InSight lander, its heat shield and parachute were spotted by HiRISE (which stands for High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) in one set of images last week on Dec. 6, and again on Tuesday, Dec. 11. The lander, heat shield and parachute are within 1,000 feet (several hundred meters) of one another on Elysium Planitia, the flat lava plain selected as InSight's landing location.
{...}

NASA's InSight lander on the surface of Mars imaged by the HiRISE camera onboard
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
Full-size image


NASA's InSight parachute on the surface of Mars imaged by the HiRISE camera onboard
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
Full-size image


NASA's InSight heat shield on the surface of Mars imaged by the HiRISE camera onboard
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
Full-size image

Last edited by mahdavi3d; 12-14-2018 at 04:49 PM.
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Old 12-21-2018, 09:55 AM   #104
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First instrument placed on Mars!



NASA's InSight lander placed its seismometer on Mars on Dec. 19, 2018. This was the first time a seismometer had ever been placed onto the surface of another planet.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Quote:
New images from the lander show the seismometer on the ground, its copper-colored covering faintly illuminated in the Martian dusk. It looks as if all is calm and all is bright for InSight, heading into the end of the year.


This set of images from the Instrument Deployment Camera shows NASA's InSight lander placing its first instrument
onto the surface of Mars, completing a major mission milestone.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Quote:
To deploy the seismometer (also known as the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure, or SEIS) and the heat probe (also known as the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Probe, or HP3), engineers first had to verify the robotic arm that picks up and places InSight's instruments onto the Martian surface was working properly. Engineers tested the commands for the lander, making sure a model in the test bed at JPL deployed the instruments exactly as intended. Scientists also had to analyze images of the Martian terrain around the lander to figure out the best places to deploy the instruments.

On Tuesday, Dec. 18, InSight engineers sent up the commands to the spacecraft. On Wednesday, Dec. 19, the seismometer was gently placed onto the ground directly in front of the lander, about as far away as the arm can reach 5.367 feet, or 1.636 meters, away).


A fish-eye view of NASA's InSight lander deploying its first instrument onto the surface of Mars, taken by the spacecraft's
Instrument Context Camera (ICC) on Dec. 19, 2018.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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In the coming days, the InSight team will work on leveling the seismometer, which is sitting on ground that is tilted 2 to 3 degrees. The first seismometer science data should begin to flow back to Earth after the seismometer is in the right position.

But engineers and scientists at JPL, the French national space agency Centre National d'tudes Spatiales (CNES) and other institutions affiliated with the SEIS team will need several additional weeks to make sure the returned data are as clear as possible. For one thing, they will check and possibly adjust the seismometer's long, wire-lined tether to minimize noise that could travel along it to the seismometer. Then, in early January, engineers expect to command the robotic arm to place the Wind and Thermal Shield over the seismometer to stabilize the environment around the sensors.

Assuming that there are no unexpected issues, the InSight team plans to deploy the heat probe onto the Martian surface by late January. HP3 will be on the east side of the lander's work space, roughly the same distance away from the lander as the seismometer.

For now, though, the team is focusing on getting those first bits of seismic data (however noisy) back from the Martian surface.
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Old 02-13-2019, 07:44 PM   #105
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Nasa's InSight mission: Mars 'mole' put on planet's surface
By Jonathan Amos
BBC Science Correspondent
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-47227660
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