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Old 05-03-2008, 12:27 PM   #136
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Expedition 17 Enjoys Quiet Day

Image above: The Expedition 17 crew works in the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory. Photo Credit: NASA TV

The Expedition 17 crew enjoyed a relatively quiet day Friday, conducting routine maintenance work and exercise.

Commander Sergei Volkov audited and restocked the International Space Station’s Docking and Internal Transfer System accessory kits in the Soyuz TMA-12. He also worked with the Russian experiment Diatomea, an ocean observations program.

Along with Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko, Volkov conducted an audit of available stowage space in the Pirs docking compartment, as well as the Zarya and Zvezda modules.

Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman worked with the Coarsening in Solid Liquid Mixtures-2 experiment, which examines the growth, or coarsening, of tin particles suspended in a liquid tin-lead matrix. Coarsening impacts the strength of metal alloys such as aluminum and other materials critical for aerospace applications. He also packed items for return to Earth when space shuttle Discovery visits during the STS-124 mission.

Reisman also was interviewed by New York City's WABC-TV.

Officials have decided to delay the relocation of the Soyuz TMA-12 spacecraft from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module's nadir port until later in Expedition 17. The move, which was slated for May 6, will be postponed until late August or early September, enabling investigators to press ahead with their inquiry into the Expedition 16 crew’s ballistic re-entry. It also will allow for the delivery of a new Sokol launch and entry suit for Volkov on a future Progress cargo ship launch. The suit Volkov wore for launch and docking April 8 and 10 has a broken zipper.
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Old 05-06-2008, 03:04 PM   #137
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Crew Begins New Week Aboard Orbital Outpost

Image above: Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman works with spacewalk equipment in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA TV

The Expedition 17 crew of the International Space Station kicked off a new week Monday with science, routine maintenance and preparations for the upcoming shuttle mission.

Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman changed out containers in the European Modular Cultivation System, a facility that uses a centrifuge to grow small organisms in variable gravity conditions. Next he worked with the Fluid Science Laboratory in the Columbus module to restore data connectivity.

Reisman later participated in a private conference with astronaut Greg Chamitoff, who will arrive at the station in early June aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-124 mission and join the Expedition 17 crew. Reisman will return to Earth on Discovery.

Reisman also configured tools that will be used during the three spacewalks planned for STS-124. The crew will install the Japanese Pressurized Module of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory and its robotic arm. They will also replace a failed nitrogen tank assembly on the station’s truss.

In the Russian segment of the orbital outpost, Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko conducted an audit of equipment, including Russian spacewalk tools and lighting hardware.

Russian flight controllers are completing a series of tests on the Kurs automated rendezvous system before next week's launch and docking of the ISS Progress 29 unpiloted cargo ship.
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Old 05-08-2008, 01:43 PM   #138
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Crew Checks Out Health Care System

Image above: Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman works with the Crew Health Care System rack in the Destiny lab of the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA TV

Science, maintenance and preparations for the arrival of space shuttle Discovery occupied the Expedition 17 crew’s time Wednesday on the International Space Station.

Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman performed routine maintenance on the Crew Health Care System rack in the station’s Destiny lab. The system includes hardware that provides the medical and environmental capabilities necessary to ensure the health and safety of crew members during long-duration missions.

Reisman also gathered items for transfer to Discovery, set to arrive at the station in early June on the STS-124 mission. Reisman will return home on the shuttle as astronaut Greg Chamitoff takes his place as an Expedition 17 crew member.

Commander Sergei Volkov installed additional stowage enclosures in the Zarya module. The enclosures, which were among the cargo delivered by the Automated Transfer Vehicle in April, provide more efficient stowage and improve air circulation.

Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko conducted another session with a Russian experiment aimed at improving air leak detection in station modules.
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Old 05-12-2008, 11:54 AM   #139
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Station Crew Enjoys Holiday After Busy Week

Image above: Commander Sergei Volkov (left) and Flight Engineers Oleg Kononenko (center) and Garrett Reisman dine together in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA TV

The Expedition 17 crew of the International Space Station enjoyed an off-duty day after a busy week filled with robotics, science and preparations for the arrival of space shuttle Discovery.

In observance of Victory Day, a Russian holiday commemorating the end of World War II in Europe, the three station crew members took a breather from their usual busy schedule Friday. During the light-duty day, the crew attended to several routine station maintenance tasks as well as the daily 2-hour exercise regimen to maintain physical fitness during long-duration spaceflight.

On Thursday, Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman worked with the station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2. He maneuvered the arm to grapple Dextre, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, for a test of Dextre’s latching end effector systems.

Reisman took a break from his tasks on Thursday for a chat with Stephen Colbert of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.”

Earlier in the week, Reisman gathered items for transfer to Discovery, set to arrive at the station in early June on the STS-124 mission. Reisman will return home on the shuttle as astronaut Greg Chamitoff takes his place as an Expedition 17 crew member.

Reisman also configured tools that will be used during the three spacewalks planned for STS-124. The crew will install the Japanese Pressurized Module of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory and its robotic arm. They will also replace a depleted nitrogen tank assembly on the station’s truss.

Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko installed stowage enclosures in the Zarya module. The enclosures, which were among the cargo delivered by the Automated Transfer Vehicle in April, provide more efficient stowage and improve air circulation.

Throughout the week, Volkov and Kononenko also conducted several sessions with a Russian experiment aimed at improving air leak detection in station modules.

Meanwhile, Russian flight controllers conducted a series of tests on the Kurs automated rendezvous system before the upcoming launch and docking of the ISS Progress 29 unpiloted cargo ship. Loaded with more than two tons of food, fuel and supplies for the orbital outpost, Progress 29 is set to launch May 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and dock with the station May 16.

+ Read more about Expedition 17
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Old 05-17-2008, 02:09 PM   #140
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Progress Docks to Space Station

Image above: A view of the Progress 29 cargo carrier as it approaches the International Space Station for docking. Photo Credit: NASA TV

A new Progress cargo carrier docked to the Earth-facing port of the International Space Station's Zarya module at 5:39 p.m. EDT Friday with more than 2.3 tons of fuel, oxygen, air, water, propellant and other supplies and equipment aboard.

The station's 29th Progress unpiloted spacecraft brings to the orbiting laboratory more than 770 pounds of propellant, more than 100 pounds of oxygen and air, about 925 pounds of water and 2,850 pounds of dry cargo. Total cargo weight is 4,657 pounds.

P29 launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, May 14, at 4:22 p.m. It replaces the trash-filled P28 which was undocked from Pirs on April 7 and destroyed on re-entry.

P29 used the automated Kurs system to dock to the station. Expedition 17 Commander Sergi Volkov was at the manual TORU docking system controls, should his intervention have become necessary.

Once Expedition 17 crew members have unloaded the cargo, P29 will be filled with trash and station discards. It will be undocked from the station and like its predecessors deorbited to burn in the Earth's atmosphere.

The Progress is similar in appearance and some design elements to the Soyuz spacecraft, which brings crew members to the station, serves as a lifeboat while they are there and returns them to Earth. The aft module, the instrumentation and propulsion module, is nearly identical.

But the second of the three Progress sections is a refueling module, and the third, uppermost as the Progress sits on the launch pad, is a cargo module. On the Soyuz, the descent module, where the crew is seated on launch and which returns them to Earth, is the middle module and the third is called the orbital module.
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Old 05-21-2008, 01:50 PM   #141
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Crew Continues Preparing for Discovery; Unloading Progress 29

Image above: Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman works with spacesuits aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA TV

On Tuesday, the Expedition 17 crew members aboard the International Space Station continued their preparations for the arrival of space shuttle Discovery during the STS-124 mission scheduled to launch May 31 at 5:02 p.m. EDT.

Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman spent time configuring spacesuits and other tools that will be used during the planned spacewalks of the upcoming mission.

Reisman also conducted refresher training with Commander Sergei Volkov on the Canadarm2 robotic arm in advance of Discovery's arrival.

During STS-124, Discovery will deliver Kibo -- the Japanese Experiment Module-Pressurized Module -- and its robotic arm system to the orbiting complex.

+ Read more about the STS-124 mission

The crew also continued unloading supplies from the Progress 29 cargo ship. The new Progress cargo carrier docked to the Earth-facing port of the station's Zarya module at 5:39 p.m. Friday with more than 2.3 tons of fuel, oxygen, air, water, propellant and other supplies and equipment aboard.
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Old 05-23-2008, 12:01 PM   #142
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Crew Continues Preparations for Discovery

Image above: Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman participates in an in-flight interview aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Expedition 17 crew members aboard the International Space Station Thursday continued preparations for the arrival of space shuttle Discovery during the STS-124 mission.

Discovery is scheduled to launch May 31 at 5:02 p.m. EDT and will deliver the second section of Kibo -- the Japanese Experiment Module -- and its robotic arm system to the orbiting complex.

+ Read more about the STS-124 mission

Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman reviewed Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver photography techniques with ground controllers. As Discovery approaches for docking, it will perform a “back-flip” allowing crew members on the station to take hundreds of detailed photos of Discovery’s heat shield for analysis by specialists on the ground.

Reisman also performed routine scrubbing of the U.S. spacesuit cooling loops to be used during the spacewalks of the upcoming mission.

Additionally, Reisman took time to participate in an in-flight interview with the Discovery Home Network's "G Word" television program dedicated to eco-consciousness.
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Old 05-24-2008, 03:07 AM   #143
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Science, Maintenance and STS-124 Preps Keep Station Crew Busy

Image above: The International Space Station is pictured in its configuration after space shuttle Discovery ends its STS-124 mission in June. Credit: NASA

The Expedition 17 crew continues pressing ahead with science, station maintenance and preparations for the upcoming STS-124 mission.

Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman worked on a science experiment in the Columbus module using the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The experiment, Cell Wall/Resist Wall, studies the microscopic effects of plant growth in space. Plant samples were collected and stored in a freezer for return to Earth when space shuttle Discovery completes its STS-124 mission in mid-June.

Reisman also continued checking the U.S. spacesuits that will be used during the three spacewalks planned while Discovery is at the station. Shuttle astronauts Ron Garan and Mike Fossum will work on the station’s truss structure and outfit Japan’s Kibo laboratory.

Reisman along with fellow flight engineer Oleg Kononenko and Commander Sergei Volkov spent an hour Friday morning measuring their body mass. The measurements are recorded and downlinked to specialists on the ground for analysis.

The two cosmonauts also were in the Zvezda service module checking on a coolant leak in the dehumidifiers and working on the toilet. They succeeded in repairing the toilet by replacing a micro-processor valve.
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Old 05-28-2008, 12:31 PM   #144
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Zvezda Bathroom Repairs and Shuttle Preps for Crew

Image above: The station crew reviews the STS-124 timeline during a conference with U.S. planners. Inside the Destiny laboratory are (from left), Commander Sergei Volkov and flight engineers Garrett Reisman and Oleg Kononenko. Credit: NASA TV

After repair attempts over the weekend, the Zvezda service module toilet experienced additional difficulties Tuesday morning. A toilet malfunction last week was initially repaired by replacing a micro-processor valve. The station crew members were directed to use Soyuz toilet facilities at first and are now using the main toilet again after rigging a urine bypass. Several other backup solutions are available. Ground specialists continue to troubleshoot the problem. Russian engineers are working with NASA to add spare toilet parts to space shuttle Discovery’s manifest before the May 31 launch.

Meanwhile, the station crew continues preparations for the upcoming STS-124 mission. Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman practiced photography techniques they will use when Discovery performs a Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver – a back-flip – before docking with the station on Monday, June 2. Photos of the shuttle’s thermal heat shield will be downlinked to specialists for detailed analysis. The crew also reviewed the mission timeline during a conference with U.S. planners on Tuesday morning.

Over the weekend, the crew members had an off-duty day on Sunday, performed their normal maintenance tasks and worked with ongoing science experiments.
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Old 05-29-2008, 12:21 AM   #145
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As the launch countdown began for Saturday’s STS-124 launch, the station crew started preparing video cameras for installation on Kibo, the Japanese laboratory. The cameras will be installed during a spacewalk by shuttle astronauts Mike Fossum and Ron Garan. The U.S. spacesuits on the International Space Station are also being readied for the shuttle visitors to use during STS-124's three planned spacewalks.

The Japanese experiment module – the largest station laboratory – will be installed on the Harmony Node’s port side after STS-124’s first spacewalk ends. A Japanese logistics module that was installed on Harmony during STS-123 will be relocated on top of the new laboratory.

With the crew members experiencing difficulties with Zvezda’s toilet over the last several days, mission managers have decided to add spare parts for launch aboard space shuttle Discovery. Meanwhile, procedures have been uplinked to the station as the crew attempts to return the toilet to full functionality.

Space shuttle Discovery is scheduled to begin its mission to the International Space Station at 5:02 p.m. EDT Saturday. Discovery is delivering the Japanese lab, a robotic arm and a new station crew member, Gregory Chamitoff. Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman will switch places with Chamitoff and return home with Discovery ending his stay as Expedition 17 flight engineer.
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Old 05-31-2008, 02:17 PM   #146
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Station Activities Continue While Crew Waits for Discovery

Image above: The Expedition 17 crew members. From left: Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko, Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman. Credit: NASA

Onboard the International Space Station the Expedition 17 crew is busy with maintenance and STS-124 preparations.

Expedition 17 Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman has been checking out television cameras that will be installed on the Japanese laboratory, Kibo, during the STS-124 mission. Kibo will be delivered aboard Discovery and attached to the Harmony Node’s port side.

A new station crew member, Greg Chamitoff, will arrive at the orbiting complex with the STS-124 crew. He will switch places with Reisman who is ending his stay as Expedition 17 flight engineer. Reisman will return home when STS-124 leaves the station and completes its mission.

On the station, the toilet in the Zvezda service module is working, though not at full functionality. The crew members are monitoring the toilet's condition and continuously make adjustments. Russian ground specialists along with the crew are troubleshooting the problem.

+ View hi-resolution image of the Zvezda service module toilet (934 Kb)

Spare parts from Russia for the toilet were installed in space shuttle Discovery’s middeck. Parts include a gas/liquid separator, urine collector bags, filters and other hardware. Discovery is scheduled to begin the STS-124 mission to the International Space Station at 5:02 p.m. EDT Saturday.
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Old 06-01-2008, 04:17 PM   #147
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Expedition 17 Awaits Arrival of Discovery, New Crew Member

Image above: A view of Expedition 17 crew members watching the launch of space shuttle Discovery on a television feed uplinked to the station. Credit: NASA TV

Space shuttle Discovery lifted off from Kennedy Space Center, Fla.’s Launch Pad 39A at 5:02 p.m. EDT Saturday, beginning STS-124, the 26th shuttle flight to the International Space Station.

Expedition 17 Commander Sergei Volkov and Flight Engineers Oleg Kononenko and Garrett Reisman are making final preparations for STS-124’s arrival, set for 1:54 p.m. Monday.

Discovery is carrying the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), the second pressurized component of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Kibo laboratory. The 37-foot, 32,000-pound JPM will be attached to the left side of the Harmony connecting node by shuttle and station crew members during a series of three spacewalks.

Also traveling with STS-124 is a new Expedition 17 crew member, astronaut Greg Chamitoff, who will replace Reisman. Reisman launched to the station on the STS-123 mission of Endeavour March 11.

For the latest news and information on the STS-124 mission, visit the main shuttle page.
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Old 06-03-2008, 12:12 PM   #148
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Discovery Crew Welcomed Aboard Space Station

Image above: Expedition 17 welcomes the STS-124 crew aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Space shuttle Discovery docked with the International Space Station at 2:03 p.m. EDT Monday, delivering the STS-124 crew, a new Japanese module and a new crew member to the orbital outpost.

Discovery carries with it the second component of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Kibo laboratory, the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM). The 37-foot, 32,000-pound JPM will be attached to the left side of the Harmony connecting node by shuttle and station crew members during a series of three spacewalks. The JPM will join the first component of Kibo, the Japanese Logistics Module, which was launched on the last shuttle flight, STS-123, in March.

Also traveling with STS-124 was a new Expedition 17 crew member, astronaut Greg Chamitoff, who replaced Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman.

The STS-124 and Expedition 17 crews conducted pressure and leak checks before opening the hatches between the two spacecraft at 3:36 p.m. They then greeted each other to begin nine days of joint operations.
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Old 06-05-2008, 11:12 PM   #149
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Crews Conduct Second Spacewalk

Image above: STS-124 Mission Specialist Ron Garan works outside the International Space Station's Kibo module. Credit: NASA TV

The crews of space shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station are conducting the second spacewalk of the STS-124 mission.

During the 6.5-hour spacewalk, Mission Specialists Mike Fossum and Ron Garan will perform a number of tasks to continue outfitting the exterior of the Kibo laboratory. Among their duties, they will install front and rear television cameras on the outside of the Kibo Japanese Pressurized Module, or JPM, remove thermal covers from the Kibo robotic arm system, and prepare a JPM upper docking port where the Kibo logistics module will be attached on Friday. They also will prepare an external storage platform for the removal and replacement of a nitrogen tank assembly, a task they will perform on Sunday's third spacewalk.

Meanwhile, astronauts inside the space station will activate the second of the two Kibo JPM power channels and continue outfitting the inside of the JPM.
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Old 06-06-2008, 11:54 AM   #150
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Crews Complete Spacewalk

Image above: STS-124 Commander Mark Kelly (center) and Expedition 17 Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff (top) help Mission Specialists Ron Garan (far left) and Mike Fossum remove their spacesuits after a successful second spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV

Astronauts Mike Fossum and Ron Garan completed their second STS-124 spacewalk at 6:15 p.m. EDT Thursday, when the Quest airlock was repressurized. The spacewalk lasted seven hours, eleven minutes.

The astronauts completed a number of tasks to outfit the Kibo Japanese Pressurized Module, or JPM. They installed television cameras on the front and rear of the JPM to assist Kibo robotic arm operations, removed thermal covers from the Kibo robotic arm, prepared an upper JPM docking port for Friday's attachment of the Kibo logistics module, readied a spare nitrogen tank assembly for its installation during Sunday's third spacewalk, and retrieved a failed television camera from the Port 1 truss.

At the end of the spacewalk, Fossum inspected the port solar alpha rotary joint, or SARJ. He described and photographed some features that appeared to be lines of grease.

Inside the space station, astronauts moved all the racks from the Japanese logistics module into the Kibo JPM, and closed the logistics module's hatch. The logistics module is ready to be relocated Friday from its current location on top of the Harmony node to its permanent location on top of the JPM. Both Kibo JPM power channels have been activated and are functioning normally.
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