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Old 10-07-2008, 07:26 PM   #16
tblaxland
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Originally Posted by astrosammy View Post
 A little question about the image:
...
Is it a true color image? Because all these MESSENGER images look much different to what I see in Orbiter and the old Mariner 10 images:
...
The top one looks straight monochrome. NASA have a true colour picture from the January flyby:


Larger version available here:
http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA10398
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Old 10-07-2008, 07:51 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by tblaxland View Post
 The top one looks straight monochrome. NASA have a true colour picture from the January flyby:
{image}

Larger version available here:
http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA10398

very different . time for a new addon for mercury
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Old 10-07-2008, 08:26 PM   #18
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 very different . time for a new addon for mercury
Expect one.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:36 AM   #19
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MESSENGER Mission News
October 8, 2008
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/

MESSENGER Sets Record for Accuracy of Planetary Flyby

By using solar sailing – rotating the spacecraft and tilting its solar panels to use the very small pressure from sunlight to alter the spacecraft’s trajectory – MESSENGER navigators have achieved a new record for the smallest miss distance between the intended and actual closest approach distance during a flyby of a planet other than Earth.

On October 6, 2008, the probe flew 199.4 kilometers (123.9 miles) above the surface of the planet. “Our goal was to fly 200 kilometers from the planet’s surface, and we missed that target by only 0.6 kilometers,” explained MESSENGER Mission Design Lead Jim McAdams, of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md.

That’s pretty remarkable targeting, given that MESSENGER has travelled 668 million kilometers since its last deep space maneuver in March, McAdams says. “It’s as if we shot an arrow from New York to a target in Los Angeles – nudged it three times mid-stream with a soft breath – and arrived within the width of the arrow’s shaft at the target.”



New Mercury Images Available

The MESSENGER Science Team has released five new images from the probe’s second flyby of Mercury. When the spacecraft flew by Mercury in January, one of the more dramatic images captured was of the Vivaldi crater at sunset. Two days ago, MESSENGER’s cameras took this image of Vivaldi at sunrise.

This striking view of Mercury, taken about 54 minutes before closest approach, shows the northern portion of the sunlit, crescent-shaped planet seen as the spacecraft approached Mercury. As MESSENGER continued toward Mercury, the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) captured this image of previously unseen smooth plains.

The MDIS Wide Angle Camera snapped this image, part of a high-resolution color mosaic of the planet, just 8 minutes and 47 seconds after the MESSENGER spacecraft passed above Mercury’s surface. The probe’s closest approach occurred over the dark night side of Mercury, as can be seen in this animation, so the MDIS cameras had to wait until the sunlit surface was visible before beginning to image while departing from the planet.

This image shows a view of Mercury as imaged by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in the 1970s, alongside a view of the planet with the gaps largely filled in by MESSENGER during the recent flyby. Filling in this gap will help the Science Team to use both Mariner 10 and MESSENGER data to characterize the diverse geological processes that shaped the surface of Mercury over time.



Additional information and features from this encounter are available online at http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/mer_flyby2.html. Check back frequently to see the latest released images and science results!

MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is a NASA-sponsored scientific investigation of the planet Mercury and the first space mission designed to orbit the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER spacecraft launched on August 3, 2004, and after flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury will start a yearlong study of its target planet in March 2011. Dr. Sean C. Solomon, of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, leads the mission as Principal Investigator. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory built and operates the MESSENGER spacecraft and manages this Discovery-class mission for NASA.

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Old 10-09-2008, 09:45 AM   #20
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Nice shooting!
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Old 10-16-2008, 04:05 AM   #21
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MESSENGER Mission News
October 15, 2008
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu


MESSENGER Gains Speed

Shortly after 4 a.m. this morning, MESSENGER reached its greatest speed relative to the Sun. The spacecraft, nearly 70% closer to the Sun than Earth, was traveling nearly 140,880 miles per hour (62.979 kilometers per second) relative to the Sun. At this speed MESSENGER would traverse the distance from Earth to Earth’s Moon in only 1.7 hours!

Even at this great speed MESSENGER is slightly slower than the fastest spacecraft: Helios 2. That spacecraft – launched into a solar orbit on January 15, 1976 – reached a top speed of 157,078 miles per hour (70.220 kilometers per second) relative to the Sun in April of 1976.
Because of MESSENGER’s near-perfect Mercury flyby trajectory on October 6, the mission design and navigation team decided that a trajectory-correction maneuver (TCM) scheduled for October 28 will not be needed. The next maneuver for the mission, scheduled to be carried out in two parts on December 4 and December 8, will re-target the spacecraft for the third and final encounter with Mercury in just under a year on September 29, 2009.

New Color Images of Mercury Available

The MESSENGER Science Team has released five new images from the probe’s second flyby of Mercury. To the human eye, Mercury shows little color variation, especially in comparison with a colorful planet like Earth. But when images taken through many color filters – such as the 11 narrow-band color filters on the Mercury Dual Imaging System’s Wide Angle Camera (WAC) – are used in combination, differences in the properties of Mercury’s surface can create a strikingly colorful view of the innermost planet.

Here are four images of Mercury. The image in the top left is the previously released grayscale monochrome image taken with a single (430 nanometer) WAC filter; the remaining three images are three-color composites, produced by placing the same three WAC filter images with peak sensitivities at 480, 560, and 630 nanometers in the blue, green, and red channels, respectively. Shown here are two color images of Thākur, named for the Bengali poet, novelist, and Nobel laureate influential in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

In both the optical navigation images and the full-planet WAC approach frame, a bright feature is clearly visible in the northern portion of the crescent-shaped Mercury. This Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) image resolves details of this bright feature, showing that it surrounds a small crater about 30 kilometers (19 miles) in diameter, seen nearly edge on.

This pair of images illustrates the dramatic effect that illumination and viewing geometry (i.e., the angle at which Sunlight strikes the surface, and the angle from which the spacecraft views the surface) has on the appearance of terrain on Mercury. And this NAC image, taken about 85 minutes after MESSENGER’s closest approach during the mission’s second Mercury flyby, shows a view of Astrolabe Rupes, named for the ship of the French explorer Jules Dumont d’Urville. Rupes is the Latin word for cliff.



Additional information and features from this encounter will be available online at http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/mer_flyby2.html, so check back frequently to see the latest released images and science results!

MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is a NASA-sponsored scientific investigation of the planet Mercury and the first space mission designed to orbit the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER spacecraft launched on August 3, 2004, and after flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury will start a yearlong study of its target planet in March 2011. Dr. Sean C. Solomon, of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, leads the mission as Principal Investigator. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory built and operates the MESSENGER spacecraft and manages this Discovery-class mission for NASA.

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Old 10-16-2008, 10:20 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by tblaxland View Post
 The top one looks straight monochrome. NASA have a true colour picture from the January flyby:
{image}
It's color, but not true color. Read the corresponding text. They chose color filters that have scientific interests, not filters that match the primary colors of the human eye.

Anyway, I still think the "gray" Mercury is more realistic than the "brown" Mercury. "Gray" means there isn't much difference between the amplitude in different colors. If there isn't much difference between the colors they used, there probably isn't much difference either between the three colors of the human eye (which are closer to each other).

Do we now have a complete map of the surface of Mercury?
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Old 10-16-2008, 10:28 AM   #23
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 Do we now have a complete map of the surface of Mercury?
I think still not yet, but the copied regions shrunk extreme.
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:46 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 I think still not yet, but the copied regions shrunk extreme.
Yeah, this hemisphere is pretty well covered:
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/...2&image_id=224

@cjp, thanks for correcting my error on the colour. If I read it right, Mercury is even more gray than the image I posted. BTW, this made me remember this hyper-colour-saturated picture of the Moon:
http://www.rc-astro.com/photo/id1018_big.html
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Old 10-29-2008, 11:04 PM   #25
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For Immediate Release
October 29, 2008


Media Contact:
Paulette Campbell
(240) 228-6792
[email protected]
MESSENGER Reveals More “Hidden” Territory on Mercury

Gliding over the battered surface of Mercury for the second time this year, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft has revealed even more previously unseen real estate on the innermost planet, sending home hundreds of photos and measurements of its surface, atmosphere, and magnetic field.
The probe flew by Mercury shortly after 4:40 a.m. EDT on October 6, 2008, completing a critical gravity assist to keep it on course to orbit Mercury in 2011 and unveiling 30 percent of Mercury’s surface never before seen by spacecraft.
“The region of Mercury’s surface that we viewed at close range for the first time this month is bigger than the land area of South America,” says Sean Solomon, MESSENGER principal investigator and the director of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institution of Washington. “When combined with data from our first flyby and from Mariner 10, our latest coverage means that we have now seen about 95% of the planet.”
MESSENGER’s science instruments worked feverishly through the flyby – cameras snapped more than 1,200 pictures of the surface, while topography beneath the spacecraft was profiled with the laser altimeter. “We have completed an initial reconnaissance of the solar system’s innermost planet, enabling us to gain a global view of Mercury’s geological history and internal magnetic field geometry for the first time,” Solomon continues.
The comparison of magnetosphere observations from MESSENGER’s first flyby in January with data from the probe’s second pass has provided key new insight into the nature of the planet’s internal magnetic field and revealed new features of Mercury’s magnetosphere.
“The previous flybys by MESSENGER and Mariner 10 provided data only on Mercury’s eastern hemisphere,” explains Brian Anderson, of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md. “The most recent flyby gave us our first measurements on Mercury’s western hemisphere, and with them we discovered that the planet’s magnetic field is highly symmetric.”
“This seemingly simple result is significant for the planet’s internal field because it implies that the dipole is even more closely aligned with the planet’s rotation axis than we could conclude before the second flyby,” says Anderson, who is deputy project scientist. “Even though the rigorous analyses of these data are ongoing, we expect that this result will allow us to limit the theories of planetary magnetic field generation to those that predict a strongly rotationally aligned moment.”
The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) observed the extended tail, night side, and day side regions of Mercury’s thin atmosphere – known as an exosphere – searching for emission from sodium, calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen atoms.
“The MASCS observations of magnesium are the first-ever detection of this species in Mercury’s exosphere,” explains MESSENGER participating scientist Ron Vervack of APL. Preliminary analysis of the sodium, calcium, and magnesium observations suggests that the spatial distributions of these three species are different and that the distribution of sodium during the second flyby is noticeably different from that observed during the first flyby.
“The spatial distributions of sodium, calcium, and magnesium are a reflection of the processes that release these species from Mercury’s surface,” Vervack adds. “Now that we were finally able to measure them simultaneously, we have an unprecedented window into the interaction of Mercury’s surface and exosphere.”
The probe’s Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) measured the planet’s topography, allowing scientists, for the first time, to correlate high-resolution topography measurements with high-resolution images.
“During the last flyby, the Mercury Laser Altimeter acquired a topographic profile in a hemisphere of the planet for which there were no spacecraft images,” explains Maria Zuber, MESSENGER co-investigator and head of the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “During the second flyby, in contrast, altimetry was collected in regions where images from MESSENGER and Mariner 10 are available, and new images were obtained of the region sampled by the altimeter in January. These topographic measurements now improve considerably the ability to interpret surface geology.”
Now that MESSENGER’s cameras have imaged more than 80 percent of Mercury, it is clear that, unlike the Moon and Mars, the planet lacks hemispheric-scale geologic differences. “On the Moon, dark volcanic plains are concentrated on the near side and are nearly absent from the far side,” says MESSENGER co-investigator Mark Robinson of Arizona State University. “On Mars, the southern hemisphere consists of older, cratered highlands, whereas the northern hemisphere consists of younger lowlands. Mercury’s surface is more homogeneously ancient and heavily cratered, with large extents of younger volcanic plains lying within and between giant impact basins.”
Color imaging also shows that Mercury’s crust is compositionally heterogeneous. “Although definitive compositional interpretations cannot yet be made, the distribution of different components varies both across the surface and with depth – Mercury’s crust is more analogous to a marbled cake than a layered cake,” Robinson adds. “Once MESSENGER’s suite of science instruments returns a host of data from the orbital phase of the mission, compositions will be determined for the newly discovered color units.”
“The first two Mercury flybys have returned a rich dividend of new observations,” says Solomon. “But some of the observations we are most eager to make – such as the chemical make-up of Mercury’s surface and the nature of its enigmatic polar deposits – will not be possible until MESSENGER begins to orbit the innermost planet. Moreover, the very dynamic nature of Mercury’s interaction with its interplanetary environment has taught us that continuous observations will be required before we can claim to understand our most sunward sister planet.”



MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is a NASA-sponsored scientific investigation of the planet Mercury and the first space mission designed to orbit the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER spacecraft launched on August 3, 2004, and after flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury will start a yearlong study of its target planet in March 2011. Sean C. Solomon, of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, leads the mission as principal investigator. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory built and operates the MESSENGER spacecraft and manages this Discovery-class mission for NASA.

The Applied Physics Laboratory, a division of the Johns Hopkins University, meets critical national challenges through the innovative application of science and technology. For more information, visit www.jhuapl.edu.


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Old 11-26-2008, 10:41 PM   #26
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MESSENGER Mission News
November 26, 2008
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu




Second Group of Mercury Craters Named

The International Astronomical Union (IAU) recently approved a proposal from the MESSENGER Science Team to name 15 craters on Mercury. All of the newly named craters were imaged during the mission’s first flyby of the solar system’s innermost planet in January 2008.
The IAU has been the arbiter of planetary and satellite nomenclature since its inception in 1919. In keeping with the established naming theme for craters on Mercury, all of the craters are named after famous deceased artists, musicians, or authors.
“We’re pleased that the IAU has again acted promptly to approve this new set of names for prominent craters on Mercury,” says MESSENGER Principal Investigator Sean Solomon of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. “These latest names honor a diverse suite of some of the most accomplished contributors to mankind’s higher aspirations. They also make it much easier for planetary scientists to refer to major features on Mercury in talks and publications.”
The newly named craters include:


Amaral, after Tarsila do Amaral of Brazil, considered one of the leading Latin American modernist artists.

Dalí, after Salvador Dalí, a Spanish painter and leader of the Surrealist Movement.

Enwonwu, after sculptor and painter Benedict Chukwukadibia Enwonwu, the most renowned Nigerian artist of the 20th century.

Glinka, after Mikhail Glinka, a Russian composer considered to be the “father” of genuinely Russian music.

Hovnatanian, after Hakop Hovnatanian, an Armenian painter known for his portraits.

Beckett, after Clarice Beckett, recognized as one of Australia's most important modernist artists.

Moody, after Ronald Moody, a self-taught, Jamaica-born sculptor and painter who found success in mid-20th-century London and Paris.

Munch, after Edvard Munch, a Norwegian Symbolist painter, printmaker, and draftsman, perhaps most well-known for his painting The Scream.

Navoi, after Alisher Navoi, a 15th century Uzbek poet, considered by many to be the founder of early Turkic literature.

Nawahi, after Joseph Nawahi, a self-taught artist, lawyer, educator, publisher, member of the Hawaiian legislature for many years, and principal adviser to Hawaii’s Queen Lili'uokalani.

Oskison, after John Milton Oskison, a Cherokee author who served as editor and editorial writer for the New York Evening Post.

Poe, after Edgar Allan Poe, American poet, critic, editor, and author. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre.

Qi Baishi, after Qi Baishi, a renowned Chinese painter known for his whimsical water colors.

Raden Saleh, after Raden Saleh, a 19th century Javanese naturalist painter considered to be the first modern artist from what is now Indonesia.

Sher-Gil, after Amrita Sher-Gil, an eminent Indian painter, today considered an important female painter of 20th-century India.



“It was quite enjoyable to consider candidate names from among the world's most accomplished people in the arts and humanities,” says MESSENGER Participating Scientist Dave Blewett, of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, in Laurel, Md. “It's also gratifying to have the IAU approve names that have meaning to the team members. For example, the crater Poe (named for Edgar Allan Poe) was a popular choice, as he happens to be a local favorite because of his Baltimore ties.
“Having names for many of the prominent craters will help us to remember and discuss specific locations in this previously ‘undiscovered country,’” adds Blewett.
An image of Mercury showing the locations of the newly named features is available online at http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/image.php?gallery_id=2&image_id=276.
The addition of these craters, along with the 12 features named in April, brings the total to 27 newly named surface features for Mercury in 2008. In September 2009 MESSENGER will complete a third and final flyby of Mercury before becoming the first spacecraft to orbit the planet, beginning in March 2011.




MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is a NASA-sponsored scientific investigation of the planet Mercury and the first space mission designed to orbit the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER spacecraft launched on August 3, 2004, and after flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury will start a yearlong study of its target planet in March 2011. Dr. Sean C. Solomon, of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, leads the mission as Principal Investigator. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory built and operates the MESSENGER spacecraft and manages this Discovery-class mission for NASA.

Last edited by Notebook; 11-26-2008 at 10:54 PM. Reason: format
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Old 11-27-2008, 05:58 AM   #27
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 Dalí, after Salvador Dalí, a Spanish painter and leader of the Surrealist Movement.
Dali Crater :


In case you are not familiar:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:D...ersistence.jpg
Attached Thumbnails
dali_crater.png  
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Old 11-27-2008, 02:17 PM   #28
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Dali Crater?

They should have named it LazyD crater.
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Old 12-05-2008, 09:01 AM   #29
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MESSENGER Mission News
December 4, 2008
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/


Deep-Space Maneuver Positions MESSENGER for Third Mercury Encounter

The Mercury-bound spacecraft MESSENGER completed the first part of a two-part deep-space maneuver today, providing the expected 90% of the velocity change needed to place the spacecraft on course to fly by Mercury for the third time in September 2009. A 4.5-minute firing of its bi-propellant engine increased the probe’s speed relative to the Sun by 219 meters per second (489 miles per hour) to a speed of about 30.994 kilometers per second (69,333 miles per hour).

MESSENGER was 237.9 million kilometers (147.8 million miles) from Earth when today’s maneuver began at 3:30 p.m. EST. Mission controllers at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., verified the start of the maneuver about 13 minutes, 14 seconds later, when the first signals indicating spacecraft thruster activity reached NASA’s Deep Space Network tracking station outside Goldstone, Calif.

“It was a perfect maneuver,” said APL’s Eric Finnegan, MESSENGER Mission Systems Engineer. “Initial data analysis indicates an extremely accurate maneuver execution. After sifting through all the post-burn data I expect we will find ourselves right on target.” The remaining 10% of this deep-space-maneuver’s velocity change will be imparted to the spacecraft during the second part, which will occur on December 8, 2008. The total planned velocity change is 247 meters per second.

MESSENGER is travelling at 109,435 kilometers per hour (68,864 miles per hour) relative to the Sun. One final deep-space maneuver on November 29, 2009, will target the probe for Mercury orbit insertion in March 2011, making it the first spacecraft to orbit the planet closest to the Sun.



MESSENGER Web Tool Wins Association Award

The Association of Marketing and Communications Professionals (AMCP) has awarded the MESSENGER Mercury Flyby Visualization Tool a “Gold” award in the “Web interactive capabilities” category of its MarCom Awards, an international competition for marketing and communication professionals involved in the concept, writing and design of marketing and communication programs and print, visual and audio materials.

The Web-based tool, available at http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/encounters/, offers a unique opportunity to see simulated views of Mercury from MESSENGER’s perspective, during approach, flyby, and departure, or in real-time (as the observations actually occur).


MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is a NASA-sponsored scientific investigation of the planet Mercury and the first space mission designed to orbit the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER spacecraft launched on August 3, 2004, and after flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury will start a yearlong study of its target planet in March 2011. Dr. Sean C. Solomon, of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, leads the mission as Principal Investigator. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory built and operates the MESSENGER spacecraft and manages this Discovery-class mission for NASA.
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Old 12-06-2008, 03:28 AM   #30
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A curious picture here, from the Planetary Society's blog:



MESSENGER's trip to Mercury requires a total of six gravity assists (one of Earth, two of Venus, and three of Mercury) to permit it to enter orbit at the small planet close to the Sun. This animation shows that journey and the motions of Venus and Mercury using a frame of reference that holds the Earth-Sun line fixed. The maneuver I'm talking about in this blog entry is the one labeled "DSM-4" on the orbit diagram and timeline.

Credit: NASA / JHUAPL / Carnegie Institution of Washington
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