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Old 10-04-2010, 10:18 PM   #31
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SPACE.com: "Huge Asteroid Wrapped in Thick Dust Blanket".

BBC News: "Asteroid Lutetia has thick blanket of debris".

Last edited by Orbinaut Pete; 10-05-2010 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 10-14-2010, 07:55 PM   #32
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ESA: When is a comet not a comet? Rosetta finds out.
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Old 06-03-2011, 06:43 PM   #33
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http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMSTK58BOG_index_0.html

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3 June 2011
On 8 June, mission controllers will have the first opportunity to switch ESA's Rosetta comet-hunter into deep-space hibernation for 31 months. During this loneliest leg of its decade-long mission, Rosetta will loop ever closer toward comet 67-P, soaring to almost 1000 million km from Earth.
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Deep-space wake up call

At precisely 10:00 GMT on 20 January 2014, the timer will wake the spacecraft, which, seven hours later, will transmit a check signal to let mission controllers know that the spacecraft has woken.

Last edited by Notebook; 06-03-2011 at 08:50 PM. Reason: Alarm call, I've set mine, I see its a Tuesday
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Old 06-08-2011, 01:11 PM   #35
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DLR: Good night, Rosetta – European comet chaser goes into hibernation

ESA: Rosetta comet probe enters hibernation in deep space
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Old 06-08-2011, 07:13 PM   #36
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Sister Rosetta goes before us Sister Rosetta goes before us
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Old 06-10-2011, 07:25 AM   #37
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BBC article:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13701808

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Old 06-15-2011, 10:38 AM   #38
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ESA - Rosetta:
LIVE Webcast: 25 years of comet science
from ESA/ESOC 15 June 16:30-17:30 CEST


A retrospective of ESA's historic Giotto mission with highlights of past comet science and featuring Rosetta and its ambitious goal to land on a comet in 2014.

Presenters include ESA's Director of Science and Robotic Exploration, Alvaro Gimenez, the Director of Human Spaceflight and Operations, Thomas Reiter, former ESA Director of Science and Robotic Exploration, David Southwood, as well as leading solar system and planetary scientists including Roger Bonnet, Executive Director of the International Space Science Institute, and Uwe Keller, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research.


You can watch live streaming video from that event at livestream.com, eurospaceagency channel between 16:30-17:30 CEST | 14:30-15:30 UTC | 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. EDT.

Streaming *Click here to restart the timer* minutes*Click here to restart the timer*
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:13 PM   #39
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Quote:
Date: 25 Feb 2007
Satellite: Rosetta
Depicts: Rosetta solar array wing over Mars background
Copyright: CIVA / Philae / ESA Rosetta

This image was taken by the CIVA imaging instrument on Rosetta's lander Philae during the Mars swingby on 25 February 2007, just four minutes before closest approach and at a distance of some 1000 km from Mars.
With the lander attached to the side of the spacecraft, this image shows one of Rosetta's solar array wings, with Mars in the background.
Closest approach occured at 01:57:59 UT when the spacecraft was only 250 km above the planet's surface.

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Date: 24 Feb 2007
Satellite: Rosetta
Depicts: Mars
Copyright: ESA/MPS for OSIRIS Team, MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
This true-colour image of Mars was generated using images acquired on 24 February at 18:28 UT, during Rosetta's swing-by of Mars, with the OSIRIS orange (red), green and blue colour filters. At the time, Rosetta was at a distance of about 240 000 km. The image resolution is about 5 km/pixel.

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Date: 12 Nov 2009
Satellite: Rosetta
Depicts: Earth
Copyright: ESA ©2009 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

This image of the Earth was captured by the OSIRIS instrument on-board Rosetta as the spacecraft approached Earth for the mission's third and final swingby. The image was acquired with the OSIRIS narrow-angle camera (NAC) from a distance of 633 000 km on 12 November 2009 at 12:28 UTC. The resolution is 12 km/pixel.

Three images obtained with an orange, green, and blue filter were combined to create this colour image. The illuminated crescent is roughly centred on the South Pole (south is down in this image). The outline of Antarctica is visible under the clouds that form the south-polar vortex. Pack ice in front of the coastline with its strong spectacular reflection is the cause for the very bright spots in the image.
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Old 10-27-2011, 06:43 PM   #40
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ESA:
Asteroid Lutetia: postcard from the past

27 October 2011

ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has revealed asteroid Lutetia to be a primitive body, left over as the planets were forming in our Solar System. Results from Rosetta's fleeting flyby also suggest that this mini-world tried to grow a metal heart.

Click on image to enlarge
Landslides on Lutetia are thought to have been caused by the vibrations created by impacts elsewhere on the asteroid dislodging pulverised rocks.
Credits: ESA 2011 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


Rosetta flew past Lutetia on 10 July 2010 at a speed of 54 000 km/hr and a closest distance of 3170 km. At the time, the 130 km-long asteroid was the largest encountered by a spacecraft. Since then, scientists have been analysing the data taken during the brief encounter.

All previous flybys went past objects, which were fragments of once-larger bodies. However, during the encounter, scientists speculated that Lutetia might be an older, primitive 'mini-world'.

Click on image to enlarge
Several images have been combined into a map of the asteroid. This image represents the total area viewed by the spacecraft during the flyby, which amounted to more than 50% of Lutetia’s surface.
Credits: ESA 2011 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


Now they are much more certain. Images from the OSIRIS camera reveal that parts of Lutetia's surface are around 3.6 billion years old. Other parts are young by astronomical standards, at 50–80 million years old.

Astronomers estimate the age of airless planets, moons, and asteroids by counting craters. Each bowl-shaped depression on the surface is made by an impact. The older the surface, the more impacts it will have accumulated. Some parts of Lutetia are heavily cratered, implying that it is very old.

On the other hand, the youngest areas of Lutetia are landslides, probably triggered by the vibrations from particularly jarring nearby impacts.

Debris resulting from these many impacts now lies across the surface as a 1 km-thick layer of pulverised rock.

Click on image to enlarge
This map of Lutetia is centred on the north pole. The number of craters in the asteroid's various regions have been used to date the surface. Some parts of the surface are 3.6 billion years old, while others are just 50–80 million years old.
Credits: ESA 2011 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


There are also boulders strewn across the surface: some are 300–400 m across, or about half the size of Ayers Rock, in Australia.

Some impacts must have been so large that they broke off whole chunks of Lutetia, gradually sculpting it into the battered wreck we see today.

"We don't think Lutetia was born looking like this," says Holger Sierks, Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Lindau, Germany. "It was probably round when it formed."

Rosetta's VIRTIS spectrometer found that Lutetia's composition is remarkably uniform across all the observed regions.

"It is striking that an object of this size can bear scars of events so different in age across its surface while not showing any sign of surface compositional variation," says Fabrizio Capaccioni, INAF, Rome, Italy.

This is just the start of the mystery.

Read Further




NewScientist: Most pristine known asteroid is denser than granite


SPACE.com:
Discovery News: Asteroid Fails to Make It Big
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Old 01-25-2012, 12:07 AM   #41
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The Planetary Society Blog: At last: Rosetta's Mars flyby photos have been released!
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:24 AM   #42
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Old data from the Lutetia fly-by in July 2010.

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This spectacular movie shows a sequence of images snapped by Rosetta as it flew past the main-belt asteroid on 10 July 2010.

The sequence begins nine and a half hours before Rosetta made its closest pass, when the asteroid still appeared like a distant tumbling speck seen from a distance of 500 000 km.
Did a search for this in the thread, and I don't think its been here before:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMXCODXR3H_index_0.html

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Old 10-11-2013, 04:53 PM   #43
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ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up:
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11 October 2013

ESA’s comet-chasing mission Rosetta will wake up in 100 days’ time from deep-space hibernation to reach the destination it has been cruising towards for a decade.

{...}

Rosetta’s internal alarm clock is set for 10:00 GMT on 20 January 2014.

Once it wakes up, Rosetta will first warm up its navigation instruments and then it must stop spinning to point its main antenna at Earth, to let the ground team know it is still alive.

“We don’t know exactly at what time Rosetta will make first contact with Earth, but we don’t expect it to be before about 17:45 GMT on the same day,” says Fred Jansen, ESA’s Rosetta mission manager.

“We are very excited to have this important milestone in sight, but we will be anxious to assess the health of the spacecraft after Rosetta has spent nearly 10 years in space.”

After wake-up, Rosetta will still be about 9 million km from the comet. As it moves closer, the 11 instruments on the orbiter and 10 on the lander will be turned on and checked.

In early May, Rosetta will be 2 million km from its target, and towards the end of May it will execute a major manoeuvre to line up for rendezvous with the comet in August.

The first images of a distant 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko are expected in May, which will dramatically improve calculations of the comet’s position and orbit.

Closer in, Rosetta will take thousands of images that will provide further details of the comet’s major landmarks, its rotation speed and spin axis orientation.

{...}


SpaceRef: Comet-Chasing Rosetta to Wake-up for Mission
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:27 AM   #44
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It's a few years old, but the second link contained this informative video for anybody who wants to know more about the lander that is now broken:


Using the Wayback Machine:
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Whenever chronic nerd-gassers gather to rip into the science of the blockbuster film, Armageddon, the conversation inevitably turns to the topic of how Bruce Willis and his fellow reluctant astronauts couldn't possibly have landed on that killer asteroid making a beeline for Earth -- at least not as depicted in the film.

It's not a simple matter to land on a small-ish object hurtling through space at very high speed.

But the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft is going to have to pull off a similar feat to land on its target comet, affectionately known as Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Given the complexity of the task, a few years ago, ESA space scientist Detlef Koschny created a little model of the Rosetta spacecraft out of LEGOs to help everyone visualize the planned flight path during meetings.

Never underestimate the appeal of LEGOs: word spread about the model, and soon everyone wanted their own personal mini-Rosetta made of LEGOS.

And now everyone can have a mini-LEGO Rosetta, because the ESA just announced the release of a LEGO high-fidelity Rosetta Lander Education Kit, based on Koschny's original design -- and there are even a few moving parts to help simulate the spacecraft's unique comet landing system that can be controlled by a simple home computer.

The kits were tested earlier this week by engineering and art students at the University of Rome -- who learned a bit about comets, Rosetta and the ESA's mission in the process. I'll let Koschny explain the rationale behind the Rosetta mission:

"Chasing comets allows us to look back into the history of our Solar System. Comets and asteroids represent the leftovers from which the planets of our Solar System formed. Understanding their composition will teach us about how our own Earth came into being and the ingredients that allowed the formation of life."

Even though Rosetta launched in 2004, it's a long journey into deep space to intersect the comet's path. That historic meeting between spacecraft and comet is not slated to happen until November 2014. Then comes the hard part: landing on a moving comet.

The Rosetta craft's Philae little refrigerator-sized lab has landing gear designed just for that purpose. First, it will literally "harpoon" the comet. Then, to keep the spacecraft from just bouncing off the comet in low gravity, its legs have been outfitted with "ice screws" (comets are dirty ice balls, or icy dirt balls, depending on which astronomer you ask) capable of drilling into the comet, anchoring the craft in place. A small rocket engine will fire as needed to hold the lander in position while all this is going on.

And then Rosetta can get on with its primary mission: getting up close and personal with Comet 67P, by collecting data on its composition. Hopefully we'll learn more about what little comets are made of -- and possibly even gain a bit more insight into Einstein's theory of relativity.

While we're waiting, there are LEGO Rosetta kits for us to play with.
I found the video here and wondered whether it was already posted.
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Old 12-20-2013, 04:16 PM   #45
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Visualisation of the deployment of the Philae lander from Rosetta at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014. Rosetta will come to within 2.5 km of the comet's surface to deploy Philae, which will then take around 2 hours to reach the surface. Because of the comet's extremely low gravity, a landing gear will absorb the small forces occurring during landing while ice screws in the probe's feet and a harpoon system will lock the probe to the surface. At the same time a thruster on top of the lander will push it down to counteract the impulse of the harpoon imparted in the opposite direction. Once it is anchored to the comet, the lander will begin its primary science mission, based on its 64-hour initial battery lifetime. Then it will use solar cells to recharge and attempt to operate for several further weeks to months, depending on the activity of the comet and how quickly the solar cells are covered in dust.
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