Orbiter-Forum  

Go Back   Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Spaceflight News
Register Blogs Orbinauts List Social Groups FAQ Projects Mark Forums Read

Spaceflight News Share news, stories, or discussions about government and private spaceflight programs; including ESA, ISS, NASA, Russian Space Program, Virgin Galactic, & more!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-11-2016, 06:56 AM   #61
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

BBC piece from Jonathan Amos.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-37609985

Quote:
The European Schiaparelli probe may have to contend with relatively dusty conditions when it arrives at Mars.
The spacecraft is aiming to make a dump-down on the planet’s Meridiani Plain a week on Wednesday.
Don't know where he's got "dump-down" from? Hope he's not dumming-down. Arf,arf.

N.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-11-2016, 08:33 AM   #62
Urwumpe
Not funny anymore
 
Urwumpe's Avatar

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 Don't know where he's got "dump-down" from? Hope he's not dumming-down. Arf,arf.
Must be the famous Cambridge baby English.
Urwumpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 08:57 AM   #63
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Its odd, he's one of the better science writers on the BBC. Never heard that phrase before, sounds a bit made up to me.

why not "un-powered descent", or just "falls the last bit".

N.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 09:14 AM   #64
Urwumpe
Not funny anymore
 
Urwumpe's Avatar

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 why not "un-powered descent", or just "falls the last bit".
Especially the final one would be far more adequate.

"dump down" sounds like what a Lancaster bomber does over Berlin.
Urwumpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-11-2016, 12:59 PM   #65
Ravenous
Donator
Default

Well we've had splashdown, and touchdown, but in this case the lower half is meant to collapse and absorb the impact like a crumple zone, so perhaps "dump-down" makes sense in a way...

Hard to explain to the average guy on the street though. They'll want to know why it doesn't have legs...
Ravenous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 01:19 PM   #66
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Well, as you know, "dump" can have certain connotations in these parts...Not convinced with the connection, but well spotted!

N.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-12-2016, 12:54 PM   #67
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Back to the Sanity Clause.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...relli_s_camera

Quote:
12 October 2016
As the ExoMars Schiaparelli module descends onto Mars on 19 October it will capture 15 images of the approaching surface. Scientists have simulated the view we can expect to see from the descent camera.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-13-2016, 02:09 PM   #68
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...al_and_landing

13 October 2016
Updates from ESA’s space operations centre as the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter approaches and enters orbit around the Red Planet, and the Schiaparelli module lands on its surface
Updates on this page will cover the following expected milestones:

Quote:
14 October
14:05 CEST: The final pre-arrival orbit correction manoeuvre that took place at 10:45 CEST went very well. This burn was the last push needed to perfectly line TGO up on the right orbit to deliver Schiaparelli onto the surface three days after separation on Sunday. Flight Director Michel Denis reports a very tiny underperformance from TGO's thrusters, but the burn was overall very good. The burn is scheduled for 12 hours after separation at 04:42 CEST on 17 October, and will raise TGO's orbit above the planet.
10:25 CEST: This morning, the final pre-arrival team briefing was held at ESOC for everyone involved in ExoMars. Teams at ESTEC and from industry listened in via audio conference. The briefing was held to review and confirm readiness for separation on 16 October and arrival at Mars on 19 October. ExoMars/TGO orbiter and Schiaparelli demonstration lander health/status? Both GO for arrival. Schiaparelli is GO for entry, descent, landing and surface operations. TGO is GO for Mars orbit insertion. At our ESOC mission control centre: Simulation training complete; teams from Flight Dynamics, Flight Control, the ESA ground stations, networks and systems are all GO. NASA ground stations have also confirmed readiness to support. ESA's ExoMars Project Manager Don McCoy said: "People have put their hearts and souls into this. We're ready to go. Thank you to everyone."
08:50 CEST: This morning at 08:45 GMT (10:45 CEST) ExoMars/TGO will conduct the final orbit correction manoeuvre before separation on 16 October. The manoeuvre means that TGO's thrusters will be fired for a minute or so to deliver a change in speed and direction of just 1.4 cm/second. This burn will refine the already highly accurate orbit, and line TGO up to deliver Schiaparelli on to its intended landing site on Mars.

Last edited by Notebook; 10-14-2016 at 02:19 PM.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2016, 02:14 PM   #69
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Live streaming has started the countdown to coverage.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...al_and_landing
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-16-2016, 03:35 PM   #70
Nicholas Kang
Spaceflight News Reporter
 
Nicholas Kang's Avatar

Default

Further milestones updates: (Continuation of Notebook's post)

Quote:
16 October

Separation set for 14:42 GMT (16:42 CEST) live video from ESOC starting at 16:30 CEST

15:50 CEST: Both Schiaparelli and ExoMars/TGO are in good shape! The A-team shift of the mission control team are now on console in Main Control Room at ESOC. ExoMars/TGO has completed its slew into separation attitude/orientation. Communication now provided by ESA's 35m deep-space tracking station at New Norcia, Australia. Separation on track for 16:42 CEST.

13:25 CEST: The separation timeline has started! Teams at ESOC are extremely busy monitoring the sequence of events scheduled for today's separation, expected at 16:42 CEST. Both the ExoMars/TGO orbiter and the Schiaparelli lander module are in great shape. The lander has been switched on and engineers monitoring telemetry - on-board status information - report that temperatures on Schiaparelli are nominal. ExoMars/TGO has already begun slewing - rotating in space - into the correct attitude for separation. Just prior to separation, at 16:31 CEST, mission controllers expect to lose the full data link with TGO, and then will follow progress by monitoring the basic unmodulated carrier signal only, as a sort of beacon. We may also see signals received via the GMRT radio telescope in Pune, India, although this is strictly an experiment and may not function as planned. One-way signal time today is 9 mins and 34 secs.

10:10 CEST: Today, Schiaparelli, still attached to ExoMars/TGO, is switched on, and its systems checked out one final time. Experts from Thales Alenia Space (Italy) working at ESOC will verify the final set of time-tagged commands, which have been uploaded via TGO and stored on board Schiaparelli so that it can function more or less autonomously throughout its mission. TGO will eject Schiaparelli at 16:42 CEST, dispatching it on a three-day coast and a six-minute descent to the surface. Ground station coverage will be provided by NASA's giant 70m Deep Space Network (DSN) ground stations at Canberra, Australia, and Madrid, Spain, which will listen for the spacecraft's signals as the Schiaparelli module separates. It will be pushed away from TGO at just 30 cm/second, but this tiny push can be detected by the DSN stations.

15 October

At ESOC today: The ExoMars/TGO mission control team begins working from the large, general-purpose Main Control Room as of 02:00CEST. Activities include spacecraft health and status check-outs and ground station tracking passes to support the highly accurate 'delta DOR' navigation technique. By this evening, all files and configuration settings needed to support separation will be finalised. Separation is set for 14:42 GMT (16:42 CEST) spacecraft time tomorrow.

For separation, releasing a 577-kg lander will make TGO wobble. This could affect the very sensitive antenna pointing needed to ensure a full data link, so mission controllers will monitor progress only via the basic radio carrier signal, with the signal acting like a beacon. The separation wobble will be visible in the Doppler data associated with the carrier signal. With a one-way signal time of about 9 min and 45 secs, mission controllers will see a first indication of progress around 16:52 CEST. A full confirmation will come later (around 17:15 CEST) once controllers re-establish the full data link with the spacecraft.

14 October

18:35 CEST: Our coverage of separation on Sunday, 16 October, set for 14:42 GMT (16:42 CEST) spacecraft time, will begin a bit earlier than previously announced. You can watch a live webstream from ESA's mission control centre, Darmstadt, Germany, starting at 16:30 CEST.


---------- Post added at 10:42 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:30 PM ----------

Exomars TGO and Shiaparelli has separated!

(But not yet confirmed)

---------- Post added at 10:43 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:42 PM ----------

Still waiting for signal from India.

---------- Post added at 10:47 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:43 PM ----------

ESA Flight director Michel Denis on console today for Shiaparelli separation.

---------- Post added at 10:51 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:47 PM ----------

Now waiting for confirmation of successful separation...

---------- Post added at 11:03 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:51 PM ----------

Separated!

---------- Post added at 11:04 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:03 PM ----------

Separated at 14:42 GMT, 16:42 CEST

---------- Post added at 11:05 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:04 PM ----------

Congratulations ESA!

---------- Post added at 11:06 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:05 PM ----------

Now showing signal received via GMRT Radio Telescope at Pune, India on screen.

---------- Post added at 11:19 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:06 PM ----------

Latest update:

Quote:
17:02 CEST: Flight dynamics team at ESOC confirms separation of Schiaparelli from TGO on the basis of Doppler signal from the carrier. The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) near Pune, India, has also recorded a very faint signal that indicates separation.

16:42 CEST: According to the timeline, Schiaparelli should have separated from TGO. Confirmation is expected on Earth soon and will be announced by ExoMars Flight Director Michel Denis once the data is on ground.


---------- Post added at 11:20 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:19 PM ----------

It seems like they are waiting for telemetry data.

---------- Post added at 11:25 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:20 PM ----------

Quote:
17:02 CEST: Flight dynamics team at ESOC confirms separation of Schiaparelli from TGO on the basis of Doppler signal from the carrier. The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) near Pune, India, has also recorded a very faint signal that indicates separation. Official confirmation expected soon when telemetry from TGO is received.
Sorry, I have missed out the bold words.

---------- Post added at 11:29 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:25 PM ----------

Official separation confirmed by Michel Denis!

---------- Post added at 11:32 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:29 PM ----------

Webcast ended!

---------- Post added at 11:35 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:32 PM ----------

Next webcast on 19th October. Stay Tuned!
Nicholas Kang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 07:42 AM   #71
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Current status of mission.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-37673617

Quote:
European Schiaparelli probe on target for Mars landing
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-17-2016, 12:46 PM   #72
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Anaimation of landing in real time, but it feels longer.

http://m.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Video...s_in_real_time

Don't know what they are going to call the last manoeuvre, touch-down, fall-down, drop-down?

N.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-17-2016, 02:34 PM   #73
Ravenous
Donator
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 Don't know what they are going to call the last manoeuvre, touch-down, fall-down, drop-down?
It's "Crunch Time"! (Hope it's not too crunchy.)
Ravenous is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 10-17-2016, 09:13 PM   #74
boogabooga
Bug Crusher
 
boogabooga's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 Anaimation of landing in real time, but it feels longer.

http://m.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Video...s_in_real_time

Don't know what they are going to call the last manoeuvre, touch-down, fall-down, drop-down?

N.
Seems to me like there is a danger of flipping upside-down at the end...

Please ESA, not TWO landers!
boogabooga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 09:31 PM   #75
Urwumpe
Not funny anymore
 
Urwumpe's Avatar

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boogabooga View Post
 Seems to me like there is a danger of flipping upside-down at the end...

Please ESA, not TWO landers!
A small danger. But yes. And guess why we teamed up with the Russians. How many successful mars probes did they land?
Urwumpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Spaceflight News

Tags
esa, exomars, mars, rover


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:07 AM.

Quick Links Need Help?


About Us | Rules & Guidelines | TOS Policy | Privacy Policy

Orbiter-Forum is hosted at Orbithangar.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2017, Orbiter-Forum.com. All rights reserved.