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Old 01-16-2008, 12:08 AM   #61
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Station Crew Works on Science and Station Maintenance

Image Above: Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko uses a communication system while working in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA

Science experiments and maintenance tasks occupied the Expedition 16 crew's time Tuesday aboard the International Space Station.

Flight Engineer Dan Tani dedicated several hours to cleaning the ventilation grills in the Zvezda service module. Later he continued troubleshooting problems with an audio terminal unit in the Destiny laboratory.

Tani also worked with a Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) circuit breaker box in the Quest Airlock that failed in late December. The RPCM will be used to route electrical loads for other modules that are being added in the near future.

Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko set up blood test equipment for a Russian biomedical study.

Commander Peggy Whitson conducted another session with the Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2 (InSPACE-2) experiment. Because of InSPACE's success during this mission, extra sessions were added to the crew's timeline. InSPACE obtains data on fluids that change properties in response to magnetic fields that can be used to improve or develop new brake systems and robotics.

Whitson took a break from her activities to participate in an interview with WHO Radio in Des Moines, Iowa.
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Old 01-17-2008, 01:52 PM   #62
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Crew Preps Spacesuits for Upcoming Excursion

Image Above: Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko work in the Pirs docking compartment of the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA

The Expedition 16 crew aboard the International Space Station worked Wednesday on preparing spacesuits for an upcoming spacewalk, conducting science experiments and performing station maintenance.

Flight Engineer Dan Tani focused on preparing the U.S. spacesuits that he and Commander Peggy Whitson will wear during a spacewalk set for Jan. 30. He cleaned and refilled the suits' water loops and conducted routine maintenance on the spacesuit backpacks.

Whitson continued work on the replacement of faulty remote power control modules in the Destiny laboratory. She also conducted two sessions with the Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2 (InSPACE-2) experiment. InSPACE obtains data on fluids that change properties in response to magnetic fields that can be used to improve or develop new brake systems and robotics.

Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko replaced cartridges in a micropurification unit, updated the station's inventory management system and performed maintenance on the Elektron oxygen-generating system.
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Old 01-17-2008, 07:49 PM   #63
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Crew Conducts Training, Reviews Spacewalk

Image Above: Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson works at the Microgravity Science Glovebox in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA

Aboard the International Space Station, the Expedition 16 crew Thursday worked on science experiments, conducted emergency response training and reviewed procedures for a spacewalk later this month.

Commander Peggy Whitson conducted two sessions with the Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2 (InSPACE-2) experiment. InSPACE obtains data on fluids that change properties in response to magnetic fields that can be used to improve or develop new brake systems and robotics.

Whitson and Flight Engineer Dan Tani performed routine maintenance on the Crew Health Care System hardware, cleaning fans and smoke detectors.

Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko performed a Russian respiration experiment and deactivated a gas analyzer in the docked Soyuz spacecraft.

After a break for lunch, the crew conducted a training session on emergency responses to depressurization of the space station.

Whitson and Tani participated in a conference with personnel at Mission Control in Houston to review procedures for their spacewalk set for Jan 30. During that excursion, the spacewalkers will maneuver along the station's starboard truss to the 1A Solar Array Beta Gimbal Assembly and replace a Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module.
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Old 01-20-2008, 06:22 PM   #64
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Crew Wraps Up Busy Week of Science

Image Above: Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson works with the temporary sleep station in the Destiny lab of the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA TV

The International Space Station continued to perform well Friday as the Expedition 16 crew wrapped up a productive week filled with science experiments and station maintenance.

All three crew members--Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineers Yuri Malenchenko and Dan Tani--began Friday morning with a routine inspection of their orbital home, followed by the collection of their body mass measurements.

Later, Whitson and Tani uninstalled the temporary sleep station rack to access the last two of five faulty remote power control modules scheduled for replacement this week. After a break for lunch, Whitson replaced the modules, and Tani assisted her in setting the sleep station back up.

Tani joined Malenchenko to continue unloading and inventorying supplies that arrived aboard the ISS Progress 27 cargo craft on Dec. 26. Progress 27 will undock from the station on Feb. 4 to make way for the arrival of Progress 28 on Feb. 7.

The crew completed another successful week of science aboard the orbital outpost. Highlights included multiple sessions with the Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2 (InSPACE-2) experiment. InSPACE obtains data on fluids that change properties in response to magnetic fields that can be used to improve or develop new brake systems and robotics. The crew also worked with the Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3 (BCAT-3) experiment, which studies tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid to help scientists develop fundamental physics concepts previously cloaked by the effects of gravity.

During the week, the crew also prepared spacesuits and participated in a conference with personnel at Mission Control in Houston to review procedures for the spacewalk set for Jan 30. During that excursion, Whitson and Tani will maneuver along the station's starboard truss to the 1A Solar Array Beta Gimbal Assembly and replace a Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module.
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Old 01-25-2008, 01:27 PM   #65
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Upcoming Spacewalk, New Progress Await Expedition 16

Image Above: Commander Peggy Whitson (left) and Flight Engineer Dan Tani answer questions from the Chicago Daily Tribune on Thursday morning. Image credit: NASA TV

Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Dan Tani are readying their spacesuits for the upcoming spacewalk on Wednesday, Jan. 30. They are installing metal oxide canisters that remove carbon dioxide and new batteries to power their suits for the 6-hour spacewalk.

Next week’s spacewalk activities include inspecting the station's right solar array gear and removing and replacing the "broom" -- the bearing motor roll ring module. Over the weekend, cameras on the Canadarm2 will videotape the condition of the solar array gear as it rotates 360 degrees. The video inspection will assist engineers on the ground as they formulate a plan on future repairs.

On Monday, Feb. 4, a Progress 27 resupply vehicle will leave the orbiting laboratory and be replaced three days later when the Progress 28 arrives. In preparation for the arrival of Progress 28, Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko is testing an automated rendezvous system from the Pirs docking compartment.
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Old 01-26-2008, 10:49 PM   #66
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Video Inspections of Solar Array Gear This Weekend

Image Above: Commander Peggy Whitson (left) and Flight Engineer Dan Tani are at the robotics workstation maneuvering the Canadarm2 for video inspections. Image credit: NASA TV

The station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, is in position with cameras to videotape the condition of a solar array gear this weekend. The video inspection of the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) as it rotates will assist engineers on the ground as they formulate a plan on future repairs. The starboard side SARJ will rotate 360 degrees twice, once on Saturday and once on Sunday.

Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Dan Tani were at the robotics workstation as the Canadarm2 walked off the Harmony Node to the Mobile Transporter (MT) on the station’s truss structure. The MT then slowly moved the robotic arm near the Starboard 3 truss where it was maneuvered into position for this weekend’s inspection.

Earlier in the week, Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko tested an automated rendezvous system on the Russian side of the International Space Station. Russian ground specialists will review the downlinked data as they prepare for the upcoming launch and docking of Europe’s new cargo delivery vehicle, the Automated Transfer Vehicle.

Station crew members continue packing a docked Progress 27 cargo craft with discarded items. The Progress 27 will undock, deorbit and burn up in Earth’s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean on Feb. 4. A Progress 28 resupply vehicle will arrive at the Pirs docking compartment three days later.
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Old 01-29-2008, 01:07 PM   #67
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Solar Array Inspected; Crew Prepares for Spacewalk Wednesday

Image Above: Flight Engineer Dan Tani retrieves a spare Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module from storage inside the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3. Image credit: NASA TV

Over the weekend, the Expedition 16 crew members monitored the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) as it rotated 360 degrees twice, once on Saturday and once on Sunday. This allowed video cameras on the station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, to inspect the contaminated joint as it captured hours of imagery. The data is being analyzed for future repairs.

Further inspections of the SARJ will be made as a part of a spacewalk by station Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Dan Tani scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 5:20 a.m. EST.

+ Expedition 16 EVA Mission Status Briefing Materials, Jan. 28, 2008

The main objective of the spacewalk is the removal and replacement of the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM). The BMRRM rotates one of the station's two starboard solar wings that track the sun and generate power. Whitson and Tani will maneuver along the station’s starboard truss to the 1A Solar Array Beta Gimbal Assembly to replace the BMRRM.

On Monday, Whitson and Tani gathered and configured tools and held a procedure review with flight controllers on the ground in preparation for the spacewalk.
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Old 01-30-2008, 01:41 PM   #68
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U.S. Spacewalkers Replace Solar Array Motor

Image Above: A spacewalker works on the starboard side of the International Space Station's truss structure. Image credit: NASA TV

U.S. spacewalkers Peggy Whitson, station commander, and Dan Tani, flight engineer, began a spacewalk from the Quest airlock of the International Space Station at 4:56 a.m. EST. Spacewalk tasks include moving to the starboard side of the truss structure, removing and replacing a Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM) and inspecting a Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). Today’s spacewalk is planned to last 6.5 hours.

+ Read more about the spacewalk
+ Watch NASA TV

Just after 7 a.m. the spacewalkers removed and replaced the BMRRM. The BMRRM, called the “broom”, drives the solar arrays as they tilt towards the sun maximizing power generation. The BMRRM experienced electrical failures in early December.

The spacewalkers are examining the SARJ today after video inspections took place over the weekend providing data for engineers on the ground. The SARJ experienced electrical spikes last year and previous inspections revealed contamination and debris.
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Old 01-30-2008, 04:05 PM   #69
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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The International Space Station's two American astronauts went out on a riskier-than-usual spacewalk Wednesday to fix one of two equipment failures that have crippled their power system and threatened to stall construction.
Commander Peggy Whitson and Daniel Tani floated outside well before dawn in the United States, hauling a new motor that NASA hoped would enable a solar wing to tilt toward the sun again and draw more power for the orbiting complex.
The spacewalk had barely begun when a radio-relay problem cropped up, preventing Whitson and Tani from hearing Mission Control. Flight controllers managed to restore communication through a backup channel within 20 minutes, allowing the spacewalk to proceed.
"Welcome back,'' a relieved Tani told Mission Control.
The tilting mechanism stopped working in early December, exacerbating a power problem that arose three months earlier when a solar wing rotating joint jammed and had to be shut down.
Engineers traced the most recent trouble to a suspect motor. Luckily, the international space station had a spare on board.
To avoid being shocked, Whitson and Tani had to do the replacement job on the dark side of Earth, pausing during daytime passes when 160 volts of electricity would course through the cables, which had to be disconnected. As an added precaution, the spacewalkers were advised not to point any non-essential lights at the solar wing in question to prevent power generation.
The motor weighs close to 113 kilograms and is enclosed in a 75-centimetre can with two handles on the end, looking somewhat like a garbage can. It serves as the structural backbone for the solar wing, and the spacewalkers had to be careful that the wing didn't come off and drift away.
NASA is still uncertain what to do about the clogged joint, which is supposed to continuously rotate 360 degrees to keep the solar wings pointing toward the sun. As many as four spacewalks will be required later this year to remove metal shavings from the joint and get it working again.
Even with both failures, NASA could still launch Atlantis to the space station next week with the European science lab, Columbus. But unless the tilting mechanism is fixed, any further shuttle missions would be in jeopardy. The joint problem alone, if left unresolved, could delay shuttle flights starting in the fall.
It was the first spacewalk for Tani since his 90-year-old mother was killed in a car accident outside Chicago just before Christmas. Flight director Holly Ridings said Tani has been coping extremely well, and that his work has not been affected.
Tani was supposed to return to Earth in December aboard Atlantis, but his trip home was delayed because of problems with the fuel gauges in the shuttle's external tank. NASA is now aiming for a Feb. 7 liftoff after replacing a bad connector at the bottom of the tank.
Wednesday's spacewalk fell on the eve of the 50th anniversary of the launch of NASA's first satellite, Explorer 1. The very next day, Friday, will mark the fifth anniversary of the Columbia disaster.
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Old 01-30-2008, 08:23 PM   #70
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Thumbs up spacewalk complete

Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Dan Tani replaced a motor at the base of one of the International Space Station's solar wings during a 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk that ended at 12:06 p.m. EST Wednesday.

Whitson and Tani also inspected a joint that helps rotate the starboard solar arrays during the spacewalk, done from the station's Quest airlock in U.S. spacesuits.

Image at right: An Expedition 16 spacewalker translates along the starboard side of the truss structure to begin SARJ inspections. Credit: NASA TV

Most of the spacewalk focused on replacement of the motor, the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM). Called the 'broom," the motor drives the starboard solar wings as they tilt along their axis to follow the sun for optimal power generation as the station orbits the Earth.

Mission Control reported good electrical continuity to the new BMRRM. While spacewalkers were still outside, flight controllers completed a planned 3-degree rotation and then did a 360-degree rotation of those solar wings.

Major activities of the BMRRM replacement took place during the night part of the orbit, when less voltage is generated by the solar wings than when they are exposed to the sun. The replacement BMRRM was retrieved from its stowage place in Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 early this month in preparation for the spacewalk.

The motor is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. The removal and replacement of the BMRRM took about 3 hours, including pauses during the daylight part of the orbit.

The second major task of the spacewalk was inspection of the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). That device causes the starboard solar wings to rotate in a paddlewheel-like motion to keep the arrays pointed toward the sun.

Previous inspections revealed contamination and debris inside that joint. Eight SARJ covers were removed for Wednesday’s inspection.

Station Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko helped the crew with suiting up and provided other support. Astronaut Tom Marshburn was the ground intravehicular officer. He was in the station flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center, acting as spacewalk choreographer.

Once their tasks were completed and after cleanup the spacewalkers re-entered the Quest airlock and closed its hatch. The beginning of repressurization marked the official end of the spacewalk.
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Old 01-31-2008, 02:00 PM   #71
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Spacewalkers Install New Solar Array Motor, Finish Inspections

Image Above: Dan Tani (left) carries the solar array motor back to the Quest airlock while Peggy Whitson prepares for the SARJ inspection. Image credit: NASA TV

Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Dan Tani finished their spacewalk at 12:06 p.m. EST Wednesday. They spent 7 hours and 10 minutes outside the International Space Station on the starboard side of the truss structure.

+ Read more about the spacewalk

The spacewalkers removed and replaced a Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM) that experienced electrical failures in early December. The BMRRM, or “broom”, drives the solar arrays as they tilt towards the sun maximizing power generation.

While the spacewalkers were still outside, Mission Control switched on the new BMRRM and rotated the solar arrays attached to the Beta Gimbal Assembly.

Whitson and Tani then inspected the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). The SARJ experienced electrical spikes last year and previous inspections revealed contamination and debris. Also, video inspections of the SARJ took place over the weekend providing data for engineers on the ground.
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Old 02-02-2008, 02:54 PM   #72
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Crew Prepares for Departures and Arrivals

Image Above: The Progress 27 is docked to the International Space Station as it passes over New Zealand. Image credit: NASA

The Progress 27 (P27) cargo ship undocks from the Pirs docking compartment of the space station on Monday at 5:30 a.m. EST. Loaded with trash, the P27 will undock and deorbit to later burn up in the Earth's atmosphere.

This sets the stage for the launch of the Progress 28 (P28) cargo carrier from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday at 8:02 a.m. The station's 28th Progress unpiloted spacecraft brings almost 2.5 tons of fuel, air, water and other supplies and equipment aboard.

The P28 is scheduled to dock to the station’s Pirs docking compartment Thursday, Feb. 7 at 9:38 a.m., about five hours before space shuttle Atlantis' scheduled launch at 2:45 p.m. to start the STS-122 mission.

Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson, along with Flight Engineer Dan Tani, monitored the walk-off of the station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, from the Mobile Transporter System back to the power and data grapple fixture on the Harmony Node on Friday.

On Wednesday, Whitson and Tani installed a new Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM) during a 7-hour and 10-minute spacewalk that concluded at 12:06 p.m. The Electrical Systems Officer has reported the new BMRRM is functioning perfectly.
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Old 02-04-2008, 07:12 PM   #73
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Cargo Craft Departure Sets Stage for Week of New Arrivals

Image Above: The Progress 27 cargo vehicle undocks from the International Space Station on Monday. Image credit: NASA TV

Systems aboard the International Space Station continued to perform well as the Expedition 16 crew prepared for the arrivals of an unpiloted cargo craft and space shuttle Atlantis.

The Progress 27 cargo craft, filled with trash and unneeded items, undocked from the Pirs docking compartment at 5:32 a.m. EST Monday. It will remain in orbit a safe distance from the station to support Earth-observation experiments until Feb. 15, when it will be deorbited to burn up in the atmosphere.

The departure of Progress 27 clears the way for the next unpiloted cargo craft, Progress 28, which is set to launch Tuesday at 8:02 a.m. from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Progress 28 will dock with the station Thursday at 9:38 a.m., just 5 hours, 7 minutes before the launch of Atlantis on the STS-122 mission. The shuttle's crew will deliver the newest research module to the orbiting complex, the European Space Agency’s Columbus laboratory.
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Old 02-06-2008, 01:00 PM   #74
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Cargo Craft Launches to Space Station

Image Above: This nocturnal view of the Glendale/Phoenix/Mesa, Arizona area was photographed by one of the Expedition 16 crew members aboard the International Space Station. During the last week, this area has been teeming with tens of thousands of football fans here for a big football game in Glendale on Feb. 3. Image credit: NASA

A new Progress cargo carrier launched to the International Space Station at 8:03 a.m. EST Tuesday with more than 2.5 tons of fuel, air, water, propellant and other supplies and equipment aboard.

The Progress 28 unpiloted spacecraft brings to the orbiting laboratory more than 1,165 pounds of propellant, more than 100 pounds of oxygen and air, about 925 pounds of water and 2,925 pounds of dry cargo. Total cargo weight is 5,129 pounds.

Progress 28 is scheduled to dock to the station's Pirs docking compartment at 9:38 a.m. EST Thursday, just 5 hours, 7 minutes before the launch of Atlantis on the STS-122 mission. The shuttle's crew will deliver the newest research module to the orbiting complex, the European Space Agency’s Columbus laboratory.

+ Read more about the Progress 28 launch

To clear the way for Progress 28, the Progress 27 cargo craft, filled with trash and unneeded items, undocked at 5:32 a.m. Monday. It will remain in orbit a safe distance from the station to support Earth-observation experiments until Feb. 15, when it will be deorbited to burn up in the atmosphere.

Meanwhile, as they await the arrivals of Progress 28 and Atlantis, the Expedition 16 crew Tuesday worked on science experiments and station maintenance. They also participated in a practice drill to mimic an evacuation from the station in the event of an emergenc
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Old 02-06-2008, 10:47 PM   #75
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Station Crew Prepares for Arrivals


Image Above: Commander Peggy Whitson (bottom) and Flight Engineer Dan Tani work in the Destiny Laboratory. Image credit: NASA TV

The new Progress 28 (P28) cargo carrier, launched to the International Space Station at 8:03 a.m. EST Tuesday, is right on course for docking to Pirs docking compartment Thursday at 9:38 a.m. The docking is set to occur just 5 hours and 7 minutes before the scheduled launch of space shuttle Atlantis on the STS-122 mission at 2:45 p.m.

The P28 unpiloted spacecraft brings to the orbiting laboratory more than 1,165 pounds of propellant, more than 100 pounds of oxygen and air, about 925 pounds of water and 2,925 pounds of dry cargo. Total cargo weight is 5,129 pounds.

On Wednesday, Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko tagged up with Russian flight controllers in Moscow to review procedures for the docking of P28.

The crew also conducted a routine emergency fire drill, inspecting hatches in the U.S. Operating Segment in preparation for Atlantis' scheduled docking Saturday. The shuttle's crew will deliver the newest research module to the orbiting complex, the European Space Agency’s Columbus laboratory.
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