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Old 08-15-2011, 06:52 PM   #46
T.Neo
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To be fair, there is a reason for the comparative lightness of Soyuz. Apollo was a BEO vehicle, with a service module. A big service module, with a lot of Delta V- it had to brake the CSM/LM stack into lunar orbit, and perform TEI. You need a lot of dV for that, and thus you need a lot of mass.

And STS of course is not just a little crew transport vehicle- it's a reusable orbital platform. Maybe overkill, sure. But not really comparable to Soyuz.

What is more important about Soyuz, from a design efficiency point of view, is the fact that it has more pressurised volume with less mass than an Apollo type design. Even disregarding the service module.

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Shenzhou (not even sure it has 3 seats), that's it).
At least one Shenzhou mission has had a crew of three, as far as I know.

And, even more importantly, Soyuz is light with its 7250 kg, compared to any three-seats or more manned spacecraft ever launched (uuh, Apollo (20 tons), the Shuttle (95-120 tons), and Shenzhou (not even sure it has 3 seats), that's it).

Maybe the Dragon is going to change that, but that's still to see.

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The Chinese space program could become very interesting if they sign commercial contracts for let's say, resupply mission. But again, we're not there yet.
To the ISS, highly politically unlikely. I believe China expressed interest in ISS participation, but the other partners (or at least the US) rejected them.
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Old 08-16-2011, 03:33 AM   #47
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Rejected them this year. Next year's Congress might not renew the same restriction in NASA's budget.

Tomorrow is a new day.
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:53 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Neo View Post
 To be fair, there is a reason for the comparative lightness of Soyuz. Apollo was a BEO vehicle, with a service module. A big service module, with a lot of Delta V- it had to brake the CSM/LM stack into lunar orbit, and perform TEI. You need a lot of dV for that, and thus you need a lot of mass.
I believe Soyuz would have used a separate rocket stage for LOI and TEI. Not too sure on exact details.

But yes, Apollo had one massive engine on the back as part of the fully integrated ''in-a-oney'' package, compared to the Soviet ''modular'' architecture.
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Old 08-17-2011, 10:11 PM   #49
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Parabolic Arc: Report: Chinese Space Station Tiangong 1 Enters Countdown
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Old 08-23-2011, 06:57 PM   #50
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SPACE.com: China Pressing On With Space Lab Launch Despite Rocket Failure
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Old 08-27-2011, 04:01 AM   #51
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I'll be keeping tabs on the launch of Tiangong 1, and hopefully it doesn't get delayed--it's going to be interesting having multiple stations in orbit again for the first time in over ten years. This will provide much more good news for me to keep up on.
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Old 08-29-2011, 07:17 PM   #52
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Parabolic Arc: China Plans Early September Launch for Tiangong-1 Space Station
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:09 PM   #53
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I wish china the best of luck on the launch of their first space station!

China may be the one that digs the rest of us out of this rut we are in as far as space exploration. I hope they can do a lunar flyby or Orbit soon as well.
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:31 PM   #54
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If you place your bets on the Chinese, you are pretty optimistic...
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:38 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 If you place your bets on the Chinese, you are pretty optimistic...
Why is that?
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:42 PM   #56
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 Why is that?
Because even compared to European paces, they are terribly slow with their program. They just produce a lot of propaganda for stuff, that isn't that impressive if you think more about it. How many scientific missions did China launch yet? How many manned missions? Practically, it is all just a small fig leaf for their much larger ICBM, ABM and ballistic ASuW missile programs.
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:43 PM   #57
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Well, look at their rate of progress for a start...
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:46 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Neo View Post
 Well, look at their rate of progress for a start...
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:53 PM   #59
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They are slow. But is it not sad that even with their slow pace they are leaving the US and Europe in the dust?

Heck atleast over there they don't have presidential candidates saying we don't need disaster response like FEMA DURING a storm. That helps them even how slow things are.


And what other "bet" am I going to take? SpaceX MIGHT be able to do manned lunar flybys or possibly orbits in the future. But anything more is just too much without a massive amount of money (IE gov) behind it.

The Russian space program is up to their eyeballs keeping the ISS going with our waning care about it. A moon landing seems as distant for them as it is us.
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:56 PM   #60
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Quote:
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 They are slow. But is it not sad that even with their slow pace they are leaving the US and Europe in the dust?
Is it so?
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