Orbiter-Forum  

Go Back   Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Brighton Lounge
Register Blogs Orbinauts List Social Groups FAQ Projects Mark Forums Read

Brighton Lounge General off-topic discussions. Political or religious topics may only be posted in The Basement forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-31-2018, 03:09 PM   #16
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Quote:
Prof Stephen Hawking Cambridge funeral takes place
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...shire-43582950

N.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-02-2018, 03:49 PM   #17
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Quote:
Prof Stephen Hawking's final research paper suggests that our Universe may be one of many similar to our own.
The theory resolves a cosmic paradox of the late physicist's own making.
It also points a way forward for astronomers to find evidence of the existence of parallel universes.
The study was submitted to the Journal of High-Energy Physics 10 days before Prof Hawking died.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-43976977
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-09-2018, 01:41 AM   #18
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44043605


Quote:
Members of the public are being offered the chance to attend a service of thanksgiving for Professor Stephen Hawking, who died in March aged 76.
It will take place in Westminster Abbey on 15 June and up to 1,000 tickets are available by way of a ballot system.
During the service, the scientist's ashes will be interred between Sir Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2018, 02:07 AM   #19
boogabooga
Bug Crusher
 
boogabooga's Avatar
Default

Quote:
the scientist's ashes will be interred between Sir Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin.
Wow. That's the highest caliber.

Does that mean that in about 150 years, his work will also be taught as essential introductory material to moderately studious adolescents?

We might need some more grades added to secondary school at some point...
boogabooga is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-09-2018, 07:51 AM   #20
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Hawkins has a unique place in British culture, most of us can't understand his material. I've a few of his books, and "sort of " understand some of it. Not surprising, he was a theoretical physicist!
However, its his enthusiasm that appeals. and he fits into the Einstein, Feynman, Bronowski, Attenborough of people who can get their message across.

I wish engineer level people could get that sort of recognition, Watt, Stephenson, Brunel, Wallis, Alan Bond and team.
Westminster Abbey could get crowded!

N.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-09-2018, 08:00 AM   #21
boogabooga
Bug Crusher
 
boogabooga's Avatar
Default

How many people would have understood Newton or Darwin in their day?
boogabooga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2018, 08:37 AM   #22
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

True, and how many people understand Maxwell's(or Kelvin) equations even though they are fundamental to our modern technology.

N.
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-09-2018, 07:30 PM   #23
RisingFury
OBSP developer
 
RisingFury's Avatar
Default

The work that Stephen Hawking has done is currently not complete and not fully understood. He solved some very important questions, but it'll take some time for us to arrive at the same results from different angles.

Today, Maxwell's equations can be written in four lines, in a very elegant way, which makes them easier to understand. When they were initially written, vector math was not invented yet, so operators like nabla and delta weren't a thing yet.

Once we reach a better comprehension of Hawking's work and the work on many others, we'll be able to simplify the theory for learning. And just like you touch on quantum theory and relativity in high school, it might become possible to teach some aspects of Hawking's work, along with Newton's and Einstein's.
RisingFury is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-09-2018, 08:56 PM   #24
boogabooga
Bug Crusher
 
boogabooga's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RisingFury View Post
 The work that Stephen Hawking has done is currently not complete and not fully understood. He solved some very important questions, but it'll take some time for us to arrive at the same results from different angles.
That goes for every great scientist, in their day. Newton and Darwin (and Einstein) included.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RisingFury View Post
 And just like you touch on quantum theory and relativity in high school,


Where you live, perhaps.
boogabooga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2018, 08:09 AM   #25
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Quote:
Organisers of Prof Stephen Hawking's memorial service have seemingly left the door open for time travellers to attend.
Those wishing to honour the theoretical physicist, who died in March aged 76, can apply via a public ballot.
Applicants need to give their birth date - which can be any day up to 31 December 2038.
Prof Hawking's foundation said the possibility of time travel had not been disproven and could not be excluded.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...shire-44073903
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2018, 08:16 AM   #26
RisingFury
OBSP developer
 
RisingFury's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boogabooga View Post
 

Where you live, perhaps.
I remember learning these topics in high school Physics:
- Energy of a photon
- Photoeffect
- Energy states in a hydrogen atom
- Mass-energy equivalence and energy of nuclear reactions
- Time dilation, relativistic mass increase and relativistic energ

This was in year 3, when Physics was still mandatory material, so everyone learns about it. I also took Physics in year 4, but I don't recall the material I learned then, but there may have been more.
RisingFury is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2018, 02:07 PM   #27
Notebook
Donator
 
Notebook's Avatar


Default

Quote:
Tributes have been paid to renowned physicist Prof Stephen Hawking in a Westminster Abbey memorial service.
British actor Benedict Cumberbatch, who played Hawking in a BBC drama, and astronaut Tim Peake were among those giving readings at the ceremony.
Prof Hawking died in March, aged 76, after a long battle with motor neurone disease.
His ashes are being buried alongside other great scientists like Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton.
25,000 applications
Prof Hawking's words have also been set to an original score by composer Vangelis and were to be beamed into space towards the nearest black hole after the service.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan...shire-44494389
Notebook is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Brighton Lounge


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:59 AM.

Quick Links Need Help?


About Us | Rules & Guidelines | TOS Policy | Privacy Policy

Orbiter-Forum is hosted at Orbithangar.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2007 - 2017, Orbiter-Forum.com. All rights reserved.