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Old 03-17-2009, 09:13 AM   #16
Notebook
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March news.


http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/news_mar09.html

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Old 03-17-2009, 11:27 AM   #17
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Somehow I'm wondering if the Skylon plane could actually fly, at lower airspeeds; It seems to be lacking a horizontal stabilizer.
I know some planes don't have them, delta-wing like planes like the shuttle or concorde. But the Skylon seems to have relatively small main wings, and not at the back of the fuselage. Noticed it has tiny horizontal stabilizers at the front (canard), but would it actually work at low airspeeds for this wing configuration? Normally with canard stabilizers (at the nose), the main wings are placed more to the back end of the fuselage. Watching the animation, the design just 'feels' wrong or very unstable in reality.
Anyway, they must have calculated/tested/proved that this design is possible, otherwise ESA won't give the $$$

regards,
mcduck
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Old 03-17-2009, 11:32 AM   #18
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Canards are effective even at much lower airspeeds than normal stabilizers, as they get the air flow less disturbed, but they are also more instable because of their location - small movements, can cause big torques.
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Old 05-08-2009, 04:22 PM   #19
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April news.

http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/news_apr09.html
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Old 06-03-2009, 09:13 AM   #20
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May News

http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/news_may09.html

N.

---------- Post added at 10:13 ---------- Previous post was Yesterday at 22:28 ----------

Just watched the interviews, and Alan Bond(M.D.) seems quite upbeat. Interesting comment toward the end. He says when the current generation of expendable rockets need to be replaced, there would have to be good reasons for not using Skylon/Sabre technology. I assume he means the Arianne series, wonder if he's told ESA yet...

From some of the comments:-
Quote:
Why a curved nacelle? The front points slightly down so the intake is square into the airflow when the vehicle is flying supersonically with a angle of attack. The back points down so the rocket nozzles point through the centre of mass for control when outside the atmosphere.
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Old 06-03-2009, 12:48 PM   #21
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I have a question. Are nuclear engines pollutant?
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Old 06-03-2009, 12:51 PM   #22
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like most things it depends on the design.

an orion type nuclear engine where its basically a thermonuclear warhead chucked out the back and detonated would be the worst case and a thermal nuclear rocket where the fuel never comes into direct contact with the nuclear fuel elements would be the best case and non-polluting.

of course, you have to account for pollution in this case is reffecing to radioactive contamination rather than the traditional pollutants which cause disruption by chemical means.
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Old 06-03-2009, 01:15 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 

Just watched the interviews, and Alan Bond(M.D.) seems quite upbeat. Interesting comment toward the end. He says when the current generation of expendable rockets need to be replaced, there would have to be good reasons for not using Skylon/Sabre technology. I assume he means the Arianne series, wonder if he's told ESA yet...
Well, IMHO Alan Bond is in the position to have some confidence. Of course, he would have to do his own homework, but for the limited resources he has, he as achieved a lot. Also, don't forget: Ariane V will be due for replacements, in the current pace of things, in just seven years. Too early for Reaction Engines to be bothered and his technology will likely not find use in the heavy lift segment. But in a bit more time, Soyuz will be due for replacement inside ESA. And in that window, Reaction Engines could indeed have a viable alternative to offer and get a development contract. Especially if the expected happens and EADS gets the Ariane 6 contract.

---------- Post added at 03:15 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:12 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by ar81 View Post
 I have a question. Are nuclear engines pollutant?
Depends on the engine mode. In general, you have to say yes. In special, the nuclear thermal engines are not pollutant in nominal operation, as the nuclear fuel is encased and moderated by the fuel flow around them.
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Old 06-03-2009, 03:09 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 In general, you have to say yes. In special, the nuclear thermal engines are not pollutant in nominal operation, as the nuclear fuel is encased and moderated by the fuel flow around them.
However, if it's a fission engine then the engine itself becomes a pollutant after use: you have to be careful about how you dispose of it. For the NERVA tests, for example, NASA planned to launch the Saturn on a trajectory which would result in the NERVA upper-stage crashing in or near Antarctica if it failed to achieve escape velocity... that put a lot of constraints on the launch.
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Old 06-03-2009, 06:00 PM   #25
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Not sure about the replies chaps, isn't the Sabre engine a non nuclear design?
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Old 06-03-2009, 06:03 PM   #26
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Yes, but the technology inside the Sabre engine is also useful for nuclear engines (especially the advanced heat exchangers), that Reaction Engines also is involved in a NTR project.
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Old 06-03-2009, 06:45 PM   #27
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Was it this:-

http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/dow...gine_Names.pdf


SERPENT na 8000 Liquid Hydrogen Nuclear rocket engine study.



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Old 06-03-2009, 07:37 PM   #28
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About the intake of this engine....

Someone mentioned closing the cone of it. I assume that you'd want it closed off during re-entry. (Correct me if I'm wrong.) What I'm trying to picture in my head is the shape and operation of the closing mechanism/doors. How do you properly seal off a circular area like that?
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Old 06-03-2009, 07:56 PM   #29
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I don't know! However these links may help.

http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/sabre.html

http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/ima...-nacelle-m.jpg

Also during this animation

http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/skylon_ops_anim.html

The Sabre engine has an opening, then somehow the intake is blocked? I blame it on the animators.

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Old 06-03-2009, 08:09 PM   #30
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No, like on the SR-71, the intake cone gets moved. When switching the pure rocket mode, the intake closes by extending the cone fully forward.
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