Orbiter-Forum  

Go Back   Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Spaceflight News
Register Blogs Orbinauts List Social Groups FAQ Projects Mark Forums Read

Spaceflight News Share news, stories, or discussions about government and private spaceflight programs; including ESA, ISS, NASA, Russian Space Program, Virgin Galactic, & more!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old
Unstung's Avatar
Unstung Unstung is offline
Cassini 2017
Default Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)
by Unstung 05-05-2013, 11:09 AM



The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, is a small mission to be launched aboard a Pegasus XL in 2017. The mission was selected by NASA on April 5, 2013. As seen in the animation posted above, it will provide a two year all-sky survey of exoplanets in our galaxy. The spacecraft will only be able to observe planets around closer and more luminous stars, ones with apparent magnitudes brighter than 12. Unlike the Kepler mission, TESS will not be able to discover small planets (<1 Earth radius) and ones further out, objects that could be located inside the habitable zone of a larger star. Each of its four wide-angle telescopes view 23 by 23 degree portions of the sky, combining to see 90 degree sectors at once, from the celestial equator to a pole. The northern hemisphere will be studied in 13 sectors for 27 days each then TESS will rotate to observe the southern hemisphere for the second year of its mission.

The small spacecraft will be placed into a high Earth orbit with an opportunity to transmit data to Earth for three hours every 13 days at perigee. This gives it two chances to downlink data during observations of each of the 26 sectors. The satellite will also aid the future James Webb Space Telescope mission, providing candidates for the infrared observatory to look at in the northern and southern poles where TESS observations overlap for a year each.

Massachusettes Institute of Technology article
Orbital Sciences Corporation article
On Wikipedia

Last edited by Unstung; 05-05-2013 at 11:36 AM.
Reply With Quote
Views 2622 Comments 17
Total Comments 17

Comments

Old 11-14-2014, 08:00 AM   #2
Unstung
Cassini 2017
 
Unstung's Avatar
Default

NASA: "NASA’s TESS Mission Cleared for Next Development Phase"

Quote:
NASA has officially confirmed the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission, clearing it to move forward into the development phase. This marks a significant step for the TESS mission, which would search the entire sky for planets outside our solar system, known as exoplanets.

Designed as the first all-sky survey, TESS would spend two years of an overall three-year funded science mission searching both hemispheres of the sky for nearby exoplanets. “This is an incredibly exciting time for the search of planets outside our solar system,” said Mark Sistilli, the TESS program executive from NASA Headquarters, Washington. “We got the green light to start building what is going to be a spacecraft that could change what we think we know about exoplanets.”

“During its first two years in orbit, the TESS spacecraft will concentrate its gaze on several hundred thousand specially chosen stars, looking for small dips in their light caused by orbiting planets passing between their host star and us,” said TESS Principal Investigator George Ricker of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. During the third year, ground-based astronomical observatories would continue monitoring exoplanets identified earlier by the TESS spacecraft.

TESS is expected to find more than 5,000 exoplanet candidates, including 50 Earth-sized planets. It will also find a wide array of exoplanet types, ranging from small, rocky planets to gas giants. Some of these planets could be the right sizes, and orbit at the correct distances from their stars, to potentially support life.

“The most exciting part of the search for planets outside our solar system is the identification of ‘earthlike’ planets with rocky surfaces and liquid water as well as temperatures and atmospheric constituents that appear hospitable to life,” said TESS Project Manager Jeff Volosin at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “Although these planets are small and harder to detect from so far away, this is exactly the type of world that the TESS mission will focus on identifying.”

Now that NASA has confirmed TESS, the next step is the Critical Design Review in 2015. This would clear the mission to build the necessary flight hardware for launch.

“After spending the past year building the team and honing the design, it is incredibly exciting to be approved to move forward toward implementing NASA’s newest exoplanet hunting mission,”Volosin said.

TESS is designed to complement several other critical missions in the search for life on other planets. Once TESS finds nearby exoplanets to study and determines their sizes, ground-based observatories and other NASA missions, like the James Webb Space Telescope, would make follow-up observations on the most promising candidates to determine their density and other key properties. By figuring out a planet’s characteristics, like its atmospheric conditions, scientists could determine whether the targeted planet has a habitable environment.

[...]
Unstung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2018, 12:34 AM   #3
Unstung
Cassini 2017
 
Unstung's Avatar
Default

Some updates:

Last year, the cameras on TESS were determined to have a focus issue. However, NASA eventually determined to launch anyway because it won't have a large enough impact on the mission. In January, NASA certified the Falcon 9 FT to launch medium risk (Category 2) science missions like TESS. Finally, TESS has recently arrived at Kennedy Space Center for a launch no earlier than April 16.
Unstung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2018, 06:40 AM   #4
boogabooga
Bug Crusher
 
boogabooga's Avatar
Default

Wow, looks like a really interesting mission. Seems not to be getting very much attention, though.

I find the "upgrade" from Pegasus XL to Falcon 9 interesting. Did TESS get heavier or Falcon 9 that much cheaper?

Last edited by boogabooga; 02-23-2018 at 06:44 AM.
boogabooga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 11:46 PM   #5
Nicholas Kang
Spaceflight News Reporter
 
Nicholas Kang's Avatar

Default

Launching in 1 week!



Quote:
NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite - TESS - will fly in an orbit that completes two circuits around Earth every time the Moon orbits once. This special orbit will allow TESS’s cameras to monitor each patch of sky continuously for nearly a month at a time. To get into this orbit, TESS will make a series of loops culminating in a lunar gravity assist, which will give it the final push it needs. TESS will reach its orbit about 60 days after launch.

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12884

Music: "Drive to Succeed" from Killer Tracks

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Bonus for Orbinauts!

I have created a few scenarios for this 2:1 P2 lunar resonant orbit in Orbiter. Enjoy!

(I hope this is the right orbit anyway. I am not yet an expert in this field called astrodynamics. Still a long way to go.)
Attached Files
File Type: scn DG Moon flyby P_2 Orbit.scn (2.5 KB, 1 views)
File Type: scn DG in P_2 Orbit.scn (2.8 KB, 1 views)
File Type: scn DG in P_2 Orbit (4 years later, return to same config).scn (2.6 KB, 1 views)

Last edited by Nicholas Kang; 04-10-2018 at 12:03 AM.
Nicholas Kang is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 04-16-2018, 09:30 AM   #6
Nicholas Kang
Spaceflight News Reporter
 
Nicholas Kang's Avatar

Default

Launching tomorrow! (Today for US and Europe.)

Quote:
SpaceX is targeting launch of NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) on Monday, April 16 from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The 30-second launch window opens at 6:32 p.m. EDT, or 22:32 UTC. TESS will be deployed into a highly elliptical orbit approximately 48 minutes after launch. A 30-second backup launch window opens on Tuesday, April 17 at 6:13 p.m. EDT, or 22:13 UTC.

Following stage separation, SpaceX will attempt to land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean.
Live broadcast:



Some related videos:







Pre-launch News Conference:



Science Briefing:

Nicholas Kang is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 04-16-2018, 11:17 AM   #7
Marijn
Orbinaut
 
Marijn's Avatar
Default

This is an exciting mission. I will stay up for this.
Marijn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2018, 10:23 PM   #8
boogabooga
Bug Crusher
 
boogabooga's Avatar
Default

Going live.
boogabooga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2018, 11:01 PM   #9
MaverickSawyer
Acolyte of the Probe
 
MaverickSawyer's Avatar
Default

Good launch and landing. If it were archery, the booster would have scored a 9-ring on the landing. ^_^
MaverickSawyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2018, 11:01 PM   #10
Thunder Chicken
Fine Threads since 2008
 
Thunder Chicken's Avatar
Default

Stage 1 landed!
Thunder Chicken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2018, 11:04 PM   #11
PhantomCruiser
Wanderer
 
PhantomCruiser's Avatar

Default

X marks the spot!
PhantomCruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2018, 11:45 PM   #12
BrianJ
thing
Default

Yeah!
Payload deployed.
Good luck TESS
BrianJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 04-19-2018, 11:44 AM   #14
BrianJ
thing
Default

We had clear video of the 2nd stage engine and payload during coast in complete darkness. They must have a light for each camera. Cool :-)
BrianJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-18-2018, 09:26 PM   #15
MaverickSawyer
Acolyte of the Probe
 
MaverickSawyer's Avatar
Default

The gravity assist has been completed successfully! Next stop, mission orbit.
MaverickSawyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Spaceflight News


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:01 PM.

Quick Links Need Help?


About Us | Rules & Guidelines | TOS Policy | Privacy Policy

Orbiter-Forum is hosted at Orbithangar.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2007 - 2017, Orbiter-Forum.com. All rights reserved.