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Old 05-08-2017, 08:27 AM   #106
RGClark
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With 3D printing coming to the fore, we may have universities making their own suborbital rockets, and thereafter orbital rockets by staging their suborbital ones.

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Old 05-08-2017, 08:30 AM   #107
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I'm hoping its going to be a real game-changer, at least for small rockets.
I have got into it, and am building a kit. Cheapest one I could find, so I'm not expecting much. Just learning about the processes and jargon.

N.
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Old 05-10-2017, 04:09 PM   #108
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https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...4433c-64543285

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Aerojet Rocketdyne successfully tests 3D printed AR1 engine in bid to replace current RD-180
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/technol...nsparent-glass

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Scientists 3D-print transparent glass
Scientists in Germany have successfully 3D-printed transparent glass.
Dr Bastian Rapp and his team from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology spent two and half years developing the method.
They hope to print anything from photographic lenses and fibre optics to glass structures for buildings and rooftops for cars.

Last edited by Notebook; 05-11-2017 at 10:36 AM.
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Old 05-15-2017, 11:23 AM   #109
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Indian teenager Rifath Sharook has designed the “world’s lightest satellite” using a 3D printed carbon fiber reinforced polymer.
The satellite, which weighs just 64 grams, is expected to launch on a sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Island facility, Virginia in June. Sharook has named the 4 cm device the ‘Kalam Sat’ in reference to former Indian President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam.
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...48abd-64543285
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Old 05-18-2017, 11:55 AM   #110
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https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...75762-64543285

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Russian scientists develop country’s first electron beam metal 3D printer
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Old 05-30-2017, 11:02 AM   #111
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http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...to_3D_printing

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30 May 2017
ESA is establishing a new ‘one-stop shop’ covering 3D printing for space in partnership with the Manufacturing Technology Centre.
The MTC research organisation, based in Coventry and home to the UK National Centre for Additive Manufacturing, will manage the new ESA Additive Manufacturing Benchmarking Centre (AMBC), which will provide a simple and easy way for ESA projects and hi-tech companies to investigate the potential of 3D printing for their work.
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Old 05-31-2017, 11:26 AM   #112
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https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...9223d-64543285

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NASA has announced it is 3D printing radiation shields using the Made in Space 3D printer in order to assess the levels of radiation in space.
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Old 05-31-2017, 03:01 PM   #113
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Thanks for that. That lenses or mirrors can be 3D printed may make possible large space mirrors. You just send up the raw materials for the glass and then 3D print the mirror or lens in the required shape in space. Since while in space it will be weightless, much less strengthening material would be needed and it could be lighter.

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Old 05-31-2017, 03:24 PM   #114
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That's the pro's, usual thing, how much to get the raw material up there?

Its all good news though, the more 3d printing the better, especially extraterrestrial.

N.
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:50 PM   #115
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Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 That's the pro's, usual thing, how much to get the raw material up there?

Its all good news though, the more 3d printing the better, especially extraterrestrial.

N.
I don't think the con is getting the material up there; that's actually another pro since a mirror that doesn't have to withstand launch accelerations can be made less massive.

The con, I think, is the process itself. Building a large mirror in a factory on the ground requires a large degree of precision and a fair amount of time using traditional methods. Is it possible to achieve the required precision and polishing, etc., with an additive printing process, done remotely with no outside help in zero-G? Maybe with no constant human presence to monitor the process or fix problems?

Certainly once those issues have been engineered out this would be a no-brainer for not just mirrors but all sorts of things that only need to be strong and heavy because they have to ride in a violent launch vehicle.
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Old 06-01-2017, 08:05 AM   #116
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I'm guessing that in 20 years time, we wouldn't recognise an orbital 3d printer. More robot than printer. (I think Star Trek had a story about a robotic repair station?).

For a mirror or lens, know nothing about them. Would a 3d printed mirror need polishing? Wouldn't that be took care of in the accuracy of printing?

N.
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Old 06-01-2017, 11:25 AM   #117
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https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...c4c53-64543285

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Australian and Singapore – based space start up, Gilmour Space Technologies has received $3.7 million ($5 million AUD) in Series A investment funding to develop its launch vehicles which use 3D printed rocket fuel.
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Old 06-01-2017, 04:12 PM   #118
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Originally Posted by Notebook View Post
 I'm guessing that in 20 years time, we wouldn't recognise an orbital 3d printer. More robot than printer. (I think Star Trek had a story about a robotic repair station?).

For a mirror or lens, know nothing about them. Would a 3d printed mirror need polishing? Wouldn't that be took care of in the accuracy of printing?

N.
Yep, across the board. The automated repair station was in Enterprise, season 2. And the need to polish the mirror or mirror segments is going to be a major issue.
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Old 06-06-2017, 11:35 AM   #119
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https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...c1b77-64543285

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The aerospace arm of British multinational GKN has signed an agreement with US research facility Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).
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Old 06-13-2017, 11:22 AM   #120
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https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...72531-64543285

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Disney publishes patent for anti-scanning filament 3D printing method
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