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Old 04-03-2010, 04:47 AM   #91
Yoda
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Here's is my image for tonight that I just took of NGC2903 just before the clouds rolled in.

Camera: Orion Starshoot II 5x7 minutes with Light polution filter using LX90 8-inch, autoguided.

Not too shabby.

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Old 04-03-2010, 09:18 AM   #92
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Wow, that's impressive!
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Old 05-28-2010, 01:27 PM   #93
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Here's a combination photograph of the beautiful red Moon I saw last night (One through a telescope at 36X, one at 3X zoom):
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Old 05-28-2010, 05:52 PM   #94
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That's a great shot yoda, what did you use for autoguiding?
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Old 06-14-2010, 09:15 PM   #95
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I saw a wonderful Sunset this evening, and took some photos for my website - you can find them here:

http://georgek.heliohost.org/photos.html
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Old 06-15-2010, 06:50 PM   #96
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Here's a time lapse video of comet C/2009 R1 (McNaught) that I shot this morning just before sunrise as the comet was rising over the trees. It's 43 minutes compressed into about 40 seconds, ending right as sunlight obscured the comet completely. The telescope was an 8" LX200 and the camera was a modified Samsung SDC-435 set at its maximum integration of 8 seconds per video frame.
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Old 06-16-2010, 01:48 AM   #97
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Thanks Messierhunter. I was surprised to see how fast it was moving, it won't be long until it is no longer observable for a while.
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Old 06-17-2010, 11:05 PM   #98
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Here's mine, taken during 30 minutes after midnight local time yesterday.
Panasonic dmc-fz8, 190x4s, 3600iso, 12x zoom (432mm on 35mm equivalent)


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Old 06-25-2010, 03:16 AM   #99
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That's a very nice shot of the comet McWgogs! You can really see the tail clearly. Here's a video of ISS I shot tonight. It was an 82 degree pass and I was able to follow it almost all the way up to the top; at the end of the video the LX200 started its automatic cord untangle maneuver (kind of like an equatorial mount flip) and I wasn't able to reacquire it on the other side until it was behind a tree.
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Old 06-25-2010, 11:08 AM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Messierhunter View Post
 That's a very nice shot of the comet McWgogs! You can really see the tail clearly. Here's a video of ISS I shot tonight. It was an 82 degree pass and I was able to follow it almost all the way up to the top; at the end of the video the LX200 started its automatic cord untangle maneuver (kind of like an equatorial mount flip) and I wasn't able to reacquire it on the other side until it was behind a tree.
YouTube- International Space Station - 6/24/10
Beautiful - what was your magnification? I have seen the ISS twice at 180X using hand guiding, but I would like to try it at lower if possible, so that tracking is easier.
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Old 06-25-2010, 01:20 PM   #101
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The field of view was roughly equivalent to 200x magnification with a plossl eyepiece.
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Old 07-06-2010, 08:34 PM   #102
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Here are some images my Dad took with his compact camera, and I edited. All are 15-second exposures.

Ursa Major:



Lyra:

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Old 07-06-2010, 09:04 PM   #103
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I think the colors are a bit über-saturated...

By the way, if you want to determine the color of a star with non-astronomical digital cam, use bad focus so that the star's image gets smudged over more pixels.


CCDs are sensitive to a wide range of photon energies, from UV to near IR. Once a photon hits the CCD it liberates an electron. The electron is counted, so you know a photon hit the CCD, but you don't know it's color.

The way to get color information is by putting a filter in front of the CCD. In astronomy, usually you put one filter in front of the entire CCD, so only a narrow band of photons gets through - red color photons, for example. Since your object in the sky isn't really moving fast, you can afford to take several images through different filters and then assemble them...

But in day to day photography, your object does move. It's impractical to take several shots of your object. To solve that problem, the day to day CCD cams have a mesh of different color filters in front of their CCD. One pixel will thus register only red, one only blue,...

Because a star is very small and may only cover a few pixels, you may only get a few pixel's worth of color data. If you smudge the image over a wider area, you'll cover more pixels and get more color data that will construct a better real-color image.
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Old 07-24-2010, 09:26 AM   #104
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The Moon prevented any long-exposure photography yesterday, so I took a picture of it instead. I'm quite pleased with this as it shows some of the more subtle details such as the rays of Tycho and the smaller seas:

1/125 second exposure at 8X zoom:

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Old 07-25-2010, 02:22 AM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by george7378 View Post
 The Moon prevented any long-exposure photography yesterday, so I took a picture of it instead. I'm quite pleased with this as it shows some of the more subtle details such as the rays of Tycho and the smaller seas:

1/125 second exposure at 8X zoom:

{image}
I took one like that a while ago through a pair of binoculars; I'm sure I already posted it in that thread. Yours came out much cleaner.
I couldn't do it before it got too dark, right after sunset. The moon would be far too overexposed, or maybe that was just my previous [cheap] camera which only had automatic settings, or the binoculars...
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