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Old 02-15-2014, 03:33 PM   #31
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I don't mind sponsors paying out money for space exploration, as long as there is science being done while they take pictures of their logo at the destination
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Old 12-02-2014, 12:20 PM   #32
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The mission to the three icy and potentially habitable worlds (and don't forget the gassy planet!) is slowly sliding along.

AmericaSpace: "ESA's JUICE Mission Receives Approval To Advance Towards Implementation"
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The detailed study of Jupiter’s fascinating large icy moons got a step closer with the formal adoption of the European Space Agency’s JUpiter ICy moons Explorer mission, or JUICE, by the agency’s Science Programme Committee, earlier this month. This latest development marks a major milestone for the JUICE mission, allowing it to proceed towards implementation in order to meet its scheduled launch date in 2022.

[...]

JUICE must undergo a rigorous, multi-phase development process here on Earth first. To that end, the mission recently ticked off another milestone on its long road towards the launch pad by gaining approval to advance towards implementation, during a meeting at the European Space Astronomy Centre, or ESOC, in Spain, which took place on 19 and 20 November. The start of the implementation phase clears ESA to select a prime contractor for the mission by September 2015, following an open competition, who will be responsible for the design, manufacturing, integration, testing and assembly of the spacecraft. From there on, the next major milestones in the mission’s development process are the Preliminary Design Review which is expected to take place in the first quarter of 2017 and the Critical Design Review two years later, leading to the Flight Acceptance Review which, providing that everything goes according to plan, will eventually clear the mission for launch in June 2022.

[...]
Interestingly, JUICE is planned to produce 900 watts at Jupiter with its solar arrays compared to about 450 (half) from Juno.

A graphic of icy worlds from the article, to make this post look nicer:

Titan, Triton, Eris, Pluto, Sedna, Titania, Oberon, Rhea, and Enceladus*

*What the bottom row of icy objects appear to be, from left to right. The graphic illustrates potential ocean layers.

Last edited by Unstung; 12-02-2014 at 12:24 PM.
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Old 01-11-2015, 09:13 AM   #33
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Throughout 2015, Van Kane will describe how JUICE will explore each of its targets. He starts with the innermost moon that the spacecraft will fly by, Europa. Although JUICE will have only two flybys compared to Galileo's eleven, the Ganymede orbiter's far newer technology, combined with a working high gain antenna, may significantly improve humanity's understanding of a potentially inhabited world in the solar system.

Examples of focus regions on Europa that the JUICE spacecraft may study. Red blocks are the regional focus regions, while the most detailed observations would occur directly below the path of the spacecraft (shown as the colored arcs). From ESA's JUICE Red Book.
Description by Van Kane

Future Planetary Exploration: "JUICE at Europa"
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[...] With just two flybys, the JUICE mission will study in detail just a portion of Europa’s surface. The mission planners have chosen to focus those flybys on areas where Galileo images revealed recent geologic activity. These are terrains where the icy shell has been broken to create regions of chaotic terrain and/or have produced Europa’s characteristic ridges. These regions also have surface materials that suggest water has been brought to the surface from the underlying ocean.

To achieve the best observing conditions for the instruments, the two flybys will occur within 15 degrees of longitude of the center of the far side of Europa from Jupiter and will bring the spacecraft as close as 400 kilometers above the surface. Of the eight possible regions of interest identified to date, seven lie on Europa’s trailing hemisphere which receives the highest radiation loads. (Because Jupiter’s magnetosphere rotates much faster than Europa travels around Jupiter, the highly charged ions that create the high radiation levels slam into the trailing hemisphere; the leading hemisphere has much lower radiation exposure.)

For the two encounters, the JUICE scientific team has identified three key goals. While the plan is to use almost all of JUICE’s instruments during the encounters, for each objective only one or a few of the instruments are expected to provide the prime measurements, while a few others will provide secondary measurements.

Goal 1: Determine the composition of the non-ice material on the surface, with a focus on substances that relate to potential habitability of the subsurface ocean.

[...]

Goal 2: Search for liquid water below the surface.

[...]

Goal 3: Study the active processes

[...]
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Old 01-11-2015, 11:52 PM   #34
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What newer technologies are expected to be available for a newer mission?
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Old 01-12-2015, 04:29 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceJohnJennerLawso View Post
 What newer technologies are expected to be available for a newer mission?
Newer instruments are less massive, require less power, and are more capable (more precise, able to see more, etc.); after all, Galileo was planned way back in the 1970s, decades before JUICE (to use an example). As a result, JUICE can do all the science Galileo has done and more. New instruments include an ice penetrating radar and a mass spectrometer. More detail about the instruments is provided in Van Kane's article, and there's a table of instruments at the end.

Hopefully that gives you an idea of what newer technology can do. I cannot predict what new technologies will be available after the current generation of Jupiter missions.

Also having a functional high gain antenna that lets newer spacecraft transmit much more scientific data is very helpful, particularly for measurements that require a lot of data. Obviously images contain a lot of data, which is why Galileo couldn't monitor Jupiter's weather on a regular basis (although the mission was nearly a complete success otherwise), and I think a particularly high volume of data comes from the laser altimeter and ground penetrating radar, both of which had no equivalent on Galileo.

Last edited by Unstung; 01-12-2015 at 04:36 AM.
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Old 01-12-2015, 05:25 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by Artlav View Post
 So, why can't some billionaire donate a billion or ten to NASA or ESA?

I'm sorry ESA, I'm afraid I can't do that
The budget of ESA, before announcing bad news.

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Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 If things go on like they do, we will soon have the "Coca-Cola Dark Monolith Jupiter Moon Mission".

Launched by a Boeing-SpaceX rocket from the "Apple Space Center".
The bad news


and the launch pad.


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Old 07-26-2015, 04:35 AM   #37
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ESA: "Preparing to build ESA's Jupiter mission"
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Airbus Defence & Space in France has been selected as the prime industrial contractor for ESA's JUICE mission to Jupiter and its icy moons.

The agency's Industrial Policy Committee approved the award of the €350.8 million contract yesterday. Pending the negotiation of contractual details, this should allow work to start by the end of this month. The formal contract signing will take place after the summer break.

The contract covers the industrial activities for the design, development, integration, test, launch campaign, and in-space commissioning of the spacecraft. The Ariane 5 launch is not included and will be procured later from Arianespace.

The spacecraft will be assembled in Toulouse, France, and many other ESA Member States will also be involved in Europe's first mission to the largest planet in the Solar System.

[...]
The configuration of JUICE, from Airbus:

Last edited by Unstung; 07-27-2015 at 12:38 PM. Reason: Updated JUICE render
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Old 07-26-2015, 10:30 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Jarvitä View Post
 "Juice"? What was wrong with JIMO?
Man, that would've been a beast. More robotic spaceship than a "probe". At 58x19 meters, I guess it would easily have been the biggest "thing" we sent out there. And we could've refined the logistics of sending nuclear reactors into deep space, which can't be a bad thing.
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Old 12-09-2015, 07:10 PM   #39
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-35051034

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Airbus and the European Space Agency have signed the contract that will lead to the construction of a satellite to go to study Jupiter and its icy moons.

Known as Juice, the mission is due to leave Earth in 2022 and arrive at the giant planet 7.5 years later.

The 350m-euro deal struck between industry and Esa will see the assembly of the 5.5-tonne probe being led from Toulouse in France.

Components and instruments will be sourced from across Europe, however.
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Old 12-09-2015, 08:49 PM   #40
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...and arrive at the giant planet 7.5 years later
To me it sounds wasteful to fly 7.5 years to a planet and then make only 2 flybys on the primary target. Or would that be the length of the primary mission only, with potentially many more flybys if the spacecraft lasts?
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Old 12-09-2015, 10:23 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by francisdrake View Post
 To me it sounds wasteful to fly 7.5 years to a planet and then make only 2 flybys on the primary target. Or would that be the length of the primary mission only, with potentially many more flybys if the spacecraft lasts?
Ganymede is the primary target, which JUICE will orbit. Each Europa flyby was added later when it was found to not be too dangerous.
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Old 03-25-2017, 07:52 AM   #42
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SpaceNews: "Europe’s Jupiter explorer mission moves to prototype production"
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The European Space Agency completed the preliminary design review for the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer, giving a go-ahead to prime contractor Airbus and its partners to start building a prototype spacecraft to test systems for the challenging mission known simply as Juice.

The 1.5 billion-euro ($1.62 billion) mission — expected to launch on its seven-year journey in 2022 — is Europe’s first shot at exploring the solar system’s largest planet and its moons at close quarters. Giuseppe Sarri, ESA’s Juice project manager, said the 22-member space agency has never attempted a mission of this difficulty and complexity.

“Juice is certainly a step forward for ESA,” Sarri said. “To get to Jupiter, we will have to perform five flybys, which is something we haven’t done before. The environment around Jupiter is extremely harsh and we would have to make sure the spacecraft’s electronics are properly protected from the extremely high radiation, otherwise the computers could be dead in two weeks.”

ESA will contribute 940 million euros (in 2014 terms) towards the overall budget of the mission, covering the construction of the spacecraft, an Ariane 5 launch, the operations and scientific ground segment, as well as the actual running of the mission. The mission’s 10 scientific instruments, including cameras, an ice-penetrating radar, an altimeter, radio-science experiments, and sensors to monitor the magnetic field, will be paid for by the national space agencies of ESA’s member states.

[...]
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Old 03-25-2017, 11:30 AM   #43
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Can't wait to see the Justice League in action at Jupiter: JUICE + Europa Clipper.
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Old 09-26-2017, 12:46 PM   #44
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Quote:
26 September 2017
A long radar boom that will probe below the surface of Jupiter’s icy moons has been tested on Earth with the help of a helicopter.
ESA’s Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer, Juice, is scheduled for launch in 2022, arriving seven years later. It will study Jupiter’s turbulent atmosphere and vast magnetic fields, as well as the planet-sized moons Ganymede, Europa and Callisto. All three moons are thought to have oceans of liquid water beneath their icy crusts and should provide key clues on the potential for such bodies to harbour habitable environments.
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...cy_moons_radar
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Old 01-16-2018, 04:19 PM   #45
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Quote:
16 January 2018
ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer – JUICE – passed an important milestone, the ground segment requirements review, with flying colours, demonstrating that the teams are on track in the preparation of the spacecraft operations needed to achieve the mission's ambitious science goals.
http://sci.esa.int/juice/59935-juice...er-operations/
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