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Old 02-09-2015, 04:28 PM   #31
RGClark
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Originally Posted by RGClark View Post
 NASA page showing a model of the plumes that connects a vent at the surface to an ocean below:

{image}
"This graphic shows how the ice particles and water vapor observed spewing from geysers on Saturn's moon Enceladus may be related to liquid water beneath the surface. The large number of ice particles and the rate at which they are produced require high temperatures, close to the melting point of water. These warm temperatures indicate that there may be an internal lake of liquid water at or near the moon's south pole, where the geysers are present."
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ca...i20080207.html

In this model the temperatures don't have to be particularly high. Just near the melting point.

JPL is investigating robots that can explore fissures in volcanos. They are also considering how they could be used to travel to the subsurface through fissures on worlds such as Europa and Enceladus:

News | January 7, 2015
NASA Robot Plunges Into Volcano to Explore Fissure.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4431

Last edited by RGClark; 02-10-2015 at 03:17 AM.
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Old 02-10-2015, 04:09 PM   #32
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What are the odds of a manned mission to Enceladus by, oh say 2080?
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Old 02-10-2015, 05:37 PM   #33
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 What are the odds of a manned mission to Enceladus by, oh say 2080?
If it has life, then chances are zero -- planetary protection.
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Old 02-16-2015, 04:13 PM   #34
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Lander missions to Europa possible for costs at the few hundred million dollars range, comparable to the costs for the Mars Pathfinder lander:

Low cost Europa lander missions.
http://exoscientist.blogspot.com/201...-missions.html

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Old 02-18-2015, 04:36 PM   #35
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I want to do a similar calculation for a low cost mission to Enceladus. What's the Hohmann transfer delta-v from LEO to Saturn at closest approach? What's the travel time then?

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Old 04-09-2015, 01:47 PM   #36
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Apparently the solar system is awash

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/the-solar-sy...ter/index.html
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Old 11-23-2017, 04:05 PM   #37
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RUSSIAN BILLIONAIRE YURI MILNER PLANNING TO SEARCH SATURN MOON ENCELADUS FOR ALIEN LIFE BEFORE NASA CAN.
BY DAMIEN SHARKOV ON 11/23/17 AT 6:30 AM
http://www.newsweek.com/looking-alie...s-water-720675

I proposed such a privately funded mission for Europa:

Sunday, February 15, 2015
Low cost Europa lander missions.
http://exoscientist.blogspot.com/201...-missions.html

This could also be done for an Enceladus mission, privately funded.

A Falcon 9 launched Europa mission might cost in the range of $80 million for the launch cost only. For the robot rover, we might make a comparison to the Mars Prospector mission, which cost $150 million. However, privately funded, the examples of SpaceX and Orbital Sciences for both their launchers and their space capsules, suggests privately funded such a rover might be developed for a tenth the cost of the government funded amounts, so perhaps only in the range of $15 million.

For a Falcon Heavy mission, carrying a 1 metric ton robot rover, comparable in size to Mars Curiosity, the launch cost would be in the range of $190 million. Again as privately funded, the rover cost might be one-tenth that of the $1 billion Mars Curiosity cost, so only ca. $100 million.


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