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Old 05-22-2018, 08:06 AM   #16
Unstung
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Some interesting information about the processor:

The CPU Shack: "PowerPC Processor for TESS Planet Hunter"

The spacecraft's processor is relatively advanced and can process raw camera data before transmitting, but not radiation hardened. It also has 192GB of flash storage, a lot compared to other missions.

CPUs used in various missions: http://www.cpushack.com/space-craft-cpu.html
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Old 07-12-2018, 01:26 PM   #18
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nasa.gov : NASAs TESS Spacecraft Continues Testing Prior to First Observations

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After a successful launch on April 18, 2018, NASAs newest planet hunter, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is currently undergoing a series of commissioning tests before it begins searching for planets. The TESS team has reported that the spacecraft and cameras are in good health, and the spacecraft has successfully reached its final science orbit. The team continues to conduct tests in order to optimize spacecraft performance with a goal of beginning science at the end of July.

Every new mission goes through a commissioning period of testing and adjustments before beginning science operations. This serves to test how the spacecraft and its instruments are performing and determines whether any changes need to be made before the mission starts observations.
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Old 07-27-2018, 11:25 PM   #19
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In operation!



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NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has started its search for planets around nearby stars, officially beginning science operations on July 25, 2018. TESS is expected to transmit its first series of science data back to Earth in August, and thereafter periodically every 13.5 days, once per orbit, as the spacecraft makes it closest approach to Earth. The TESS Science Team will begin searching the data for new planets immediately after the first series arrives.
Source: NASA
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Old 08-07-2018, 09:35 AM   #20
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phys.org : NASA's Planet-hunting TESS catches a comet before starting science

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Before NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) started science operations on July 25, 2018, the planet hunter sent back a stunning sequence of serendipitous images showing the motion of a comet. Taken over the course of 17 hours on July 25, these TESS images helped demonstrate the satellite's ability to collect a prolonged set of stable periodic images covering a broad region of the skyall critical factors in finding transiting planets orbiting nearby stars.

Over the course of these tests, TESS took images of C/2018 N1, a comet discovered by NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) satellite on June 29. The comet, located about 29 million miles (48 million kilometers) from Earth in the southern constellation Piscis Austrinus, is seen to move across the frame from right to left as it orbits the Sun. The comet's tail, which consists of gases carried away from the comet by an outflow from the Sun called the solar wind, extends to the top of the frame and gradually pivots as the comet glides across the field of view.

In addition to the comet, the images reveal a treasure trove of other astronomical activity. The stars appear to shift between white and black as a result of image processing. The shift also highlights variable starswhich change brightness either as a result of pulsation, rapid rotation, or by eclipsing binary neighbors. Asteroids in our solar system appear as small white dots moving across the field of view. Towards the end of the video, one can see a faint broad arc of light moving across the middle section of the frame from left to right. This is stray light from Mars, which is located outside the frame. The images were taken when Mars was at its brightest near opposition, or its closest distance, to Earth.

These images were taken during a short period near the end of the mission's commissioning phase, prior to the start of science operations. The movie presents just a small fraction of TESS's active field of view. The team continues to fine-tune the spacecraft's performance as it searches for distant worlds.
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Old 09-19-2018, 01:21 PM   #21
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astronomynow.com : Exoplanet-hunter TESS captures razor-sharp first light images

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NASAs exoplanet-hunting TESS spacecraft, launched 18 April, has captured razor-sharp first-light images from all four of its 16.8-megapixel cameras, covering a 24-degree-wide strip of sky from the celestial equator to the southern pole.

In a sea of stars brimming with new worlds, TESS is casting a wide net and will haul in a bounty of promising planets for further study, Paul Hertz, astrophysics division director at NASA Headquarters in Washington, said in a statement. This first light science image shows the capabilities of TESS cameras, and shows that the mission will realise its incredible potential in our search for another Earth.
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Larger Image
TESS captured a 24-degree-wide 96-degree-long strip of stars during a 30-minute exposure on 7 August. Thirteen such strips will cover one celestial hemisphere. Click the image for a larger view. Image: NASA/MIT/TESS


sciencenews.org : The TESS space telescope has spotted its first exoplanet

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TESS spotted the new planet, called Pi Men c, crossing in front of its bright sunlike star 60 light-years from Earth and blocking a bit of the starlight, data collected from July 25 to August 22 show. That transit revealed that the planet is 2.14 times Earths radius and orbits its star every 6.27 days, the TESS team reports September 18 at arXiv.org.
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