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Old 09-16-2017, 02:10 AM   #346
Artlav
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Wow, i didn't expect such a stretched-out atmosphere. 1200 km between what would be about 100 km on Earth and one atm level?

...I should probably fire up Orbiter and see what we have there...
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Old 09-16-2017, 02:18 AM   #347
DaveS
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EOM was defined as final Loss of Signal (LOS), not spacecraft break-up. LOS was expected to occur due the thruster's inability to keep the antennas pointed at Earth. The first LOS was for the main Hi-gain antenna (X-band) at 11:55:39 UTC and the final LOS and EOM was the low-gain antenna (S-band) at 11:55:46 UTC.
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Old 09-16-2017, 04:42 AM   #348
jgrillo2002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy44 View Post
 The comments on that video confirm one's deepest fears about human stupidity.
Agreed. I seriously hate stupid people.
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Old 09-16-2017, 04:53 AM   #349
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artlav View Post
 Wow, i didn't expect such a stretched-out atmosphere. 1200 km between what would be about 100 km on Earth and one atm level?

...I should probably fire up Orbiter and see what we have there...
Scale height on Saturn is almost 60 km. Hydrogen and Helium are much fluffier than Nitrogen and Oxygen, and the surface gravity isn't much higher than on Earth.

Also, aerodynamic forces, heating, etc. will start to effect you somewhat higher when you're entering at 30 km/s than at more typical Earth entry speeds (though not too much higher, as atmospheric falloff is exponential).
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Old 09-16-2017, 05:40 AM   #350
Keatah
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"Surface" gravity on Saturn is about 90% that of Earth's due to density and the mass being spread over such a wide area. The max pull in any one direction (like down) assuming the surface is marked at the 1 bar altitude is around 10.4m/s.
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Old 09-16-2017, 01:05 PM   #351
cristiapi
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Originally Posted by Keatah View Post
 The max pull in any one direction (like down) assuming the surface is marked at the 1 bar altitude is around 10.4m/s.
Please, could you elaborate a bit?

---------- Post added at 14:05 ---------- Previous post was at 09:54 ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Artlav View Post
 ...I should probably fire up Orbiter and see what we have there...
Here is the state to put in your ship:
Code:
  STATUS Orbiting Saturn
  RPOS 63604273.5219458 79362888.2498281 46766156.8726015
  RVEL -6565.30431463499 -22700.6901457099 7774.13533356268
  AROT -71.42 15.50 -57.01
for MJD 58011.396634056.

You'll have a good surprise...
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Old 09-16-2017, 05:28 PM   #352
Keatah
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Despite being much more massive than the Earth, Saturn's mass is spread out. It tugs at you from all sides. The gravity is distributed in all directions, so to speak. With Earth, all the mass is more concentrated and most of it pulls you in the vertical direction.

Last edited by Keatah; 09-16-2017 at 06:57 PM. Reason: fix typo
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Old 09-16-2017, 05:56 PM   #353
Urwumpe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keatah View Post
 Despite being much more massive than the Earth, Saturn's mass is spread out. It tugs at you from all sides. The gravity is distributed in all directions, so to speak. With Earth, all the mass is more concentrated and most of it pulls you in he vertical direction.
Yes, the average density of Saturn is actually less than the density of water.
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Old 09-16-2017, 06:59 PM   #354
cristiapi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keatah View Post
 Despite being much more massive than the Earth, Saturn's mass is spread out. It tugs at you from all sides. The gravity is distributed in all directions, so to speak. With Earth, all the mass is more concentrated and most of it pulls you in he vertical direction.
Thank you.
How can 10.4 m/s be calculated? You really mean "m/s" (a velocity) or do you mean m/s/s (an acceleration)?
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Old 09-16-2017, 07:33 PM   #355
Urwumpe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cristiapi View Post
 Thank you.
How can 10.4 m/s be calculated? You really mean "m/s" (a velocity) or do you mean m/s/s (an acceleration)?
I am VERY sure he means the acceleration in m/s.
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