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Old 06-18-2008, 01:47 PM   #1
Chipstone306
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Default STS 125

NASA Focuses on Launch Pad Repair

Image above: A view of the flame trench on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center where damage occurred during the May 31 launch of space shuttle Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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With space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission successfully completed, NASA is turning its attention to evaluating and repairing damage to Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39A.

During Discovery's May 31 liftoff, the east wall of the pad's north flame trench suffered damage, with broken sections of the wall scattered from the flame trench to the pad perimeter fence.

The pad is expected to be repaired by October, when the crew of STS-125 is targeted to launch aboard space shuttle Atlantis on a mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope.

The seven-member STS-124 crew returned to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston on June 15 following their successful construction mission to the International Space Station.

Commander Mark Kelly and Pilot Ken Ham were at the controls of Discovery on June 14 as it glided through the sky over Kennedy Space Center to touch down on time at 11:15 a.m. EDT.

Kelly, Ham and Mission Specialists Karen Nyberg, Ron Garan, Mike Fossum and Japan's Akihiko Hoshide spent 14 days in orbit installing the Japanese Pressurized Module to the space station. The module is the largest section of the Japanese laboratory called "Kibo," or hope. Garrett Reisman also returned onboard Discovery. He spent three months living on the space station.

The astronauts were treated to a welcoming ceremony upon their return to Houston.
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Old 07-09-2008, 12:05 PM   #2
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Flame Trench Repairs, Crew Training on Schedule

Image above: Repairs are ongoing in the flame trench on Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller
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July 7, 2008
Workers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida are removing bricks from the damaged wall of the flame trench at Launch Pad 39A. The repairs remain on schedule and are not expected to hamper the launch of STS-125 on a mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope. The brick removal and related work is to be completed next week. Launch is targeted for Oct. 8.

The seven astronauts who will fly space shuttle Atlantis to the orbiting observatory will visit Kennedy later this week to check out the tools they will use during the flight. The visit is known as a crew equipment interface test and it gives the astronauts a chance to get familiar with the items they will employ in space.

The Hubble mission is commanded by Scott Altman, who also led the most recent Hubble servicing flight, STS-109. The crew will install new equipment on the space telescope that will enable the observatory to continue its landmark work for another five years.

Also at Kennedy, preparation of Atlantis continues on pace. Space shuttle Endeavour is also on schedule for launch in the unlikely event of an emergency with Atlantis during the Hubble mission. Workers will begin stacking the solid rocket boosters for Endeavour on Thursday. Endeavour will launch to the International Space Station during STS-126, targeted for launch on Nov. 10.
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Old 07-10-2008, 07:59 PM   #3
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Earlier today the External Tank to be used on STS-125 left the Michoud Assembly Facility. It should roll on to the transport barge "Pegasus" later today. Anticipated arrival of ET-127 at KSC is July 16.
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Old 07-10-2008, 08:03 PM   #4
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can I have a picture of one of them barges ? I have never seen one
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Old 07-10-2008, 08:05 PM   #5
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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Im...s_et_barge.jpg
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Old 07-10-2008, 08:06 PM   #6
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Thanks that's quite big
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Old 07-10-2008, 08:10 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woo482 View Post
 can I have a picture of one of them barges ? I have never seen one
Here you go: http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/i...e/05pd0052.jpg
External Tank is ET-120 being offloaded at KSC and transported to the VAB.
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Old 07-16-2008, 10:41 PM   #8
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George Diller
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
321-867-2468
[email protected]

Susan Hendrix
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
301-286-7745
[email protected]


July 16, 2008

RELEASE : 13-08


First Hubble Flight Hardware Arrives At Kennedy For STS-125


CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The first major flight hardware for the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is starting to arrive at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., to begin preparations for its targeted October launch.

Three carriers, which are pallets that will hold equipment in space shuttle Atlantis' payload bay, were delivered to Kennedy Wednesday. They will be prepared for the integration of telescope science instruments, both internal and external replacement components, as well as the flight support equipment to be used by the astronauts during Atlantis' mission, designated STS-125 and SM4.

The three payload carriers are the Flight Support System (FSS), the Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC), and the Orbital Replacement Unit Carrier (ORUC). At the end of July, a fourth and final carrier, the Multi-Use Lightweight Equipment (MULE) carrier, will join the others in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility where the Hubble payload is being prepared for launch.

The Flight Support System will attach, secure and provide power to Hubble and also contains the Soft Capture Mechanism that will assist in the de-orbiting of the telescope when its science mission is over. Among the components to be integrated onto the carriers are the Wide Field Camera 3 that will be placed on the SLIC with Hubble's two new battery modules. The Fine Guidance Sensor and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph will be on the ORUC, as well as the replacement gyros. The Relative Navigation Sensors and the New Outer Blanket Layers will be on the MULE. These components, which will be integrated onto the carriers, will be delivered to Kennedy during the first half of August.

Numerous crew aids and tools that the astronauts will use during their five planned spacewalks also will be integrated onto the carriers. The new hardware will ensure Hubble is at the apex of its scientific capability and that it functions efficiently for a minimum of five more years.

The processing and integration of the Hubble flight hardware will take approximately two months. The payload is scheduled to go to Launch Pad 39A in mid-September to be installed into Atlantis' payload bay.

Atlantis is targeted to launch Oct. 8 at 1:34 a.m. EDT.

For more information about the Hubble Space Telescope and its research, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/hubble

For more information about the STS-125 mission and its crew, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle
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Old 07-17-2008, 12:05 PM   #9
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STS-125 Mission Equipment Arrival

Image above: Atlantis' external fuel tank is towed out of the Pegasus barge at Kennedy's turn basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller
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July 16, 2008
The orange external fuel tank, designated ET-127, has been towed to the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Stacking of the tank with the solid rocket boosters is scheduled for early August.

The first major flight hardware for Atlantis' STS-125 mission is scheduled to arrive at Kennedy's Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility this week.

The payload carriers will be prepared for the integration of telescope science instruments, as well as the flight support equipment astronauts will use during the servicing mission.

At NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, STS-125 crew members are in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab practicing techniques that will be used to replace the Fine Guidance Sensor 2 and repair the Advanced Camera for Surveys.

The STS-125 mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope will update and enhance its abilities to transmit dynamic images and amazing discoveries to Earth for several more years.
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Old 07-17-2008, 02:40 PM   #10
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A view inside the PHSF where the HST payloads are being processed.

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/chan11large.jpg
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Old 07-18-2008, 09:06 PM   #11
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The SLIC, ORUC and FSS are now in the PHSF. The ORUC has been uncovered and the payload techs are now in the process of uncovering the SLIC.

Progress can be viewed at the link listed above.
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Old 07-21-2008, 03:06 PM   #12
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Busy Time Ahead

Image above: An overhead crane lifts off the cover of the shipping container containing Hubble's Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier and the Orbital Replacement Unit Carrier. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller
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July 21, 2008
Work on space shuttle Atlantis' thermal protection system continued over the weekend in NASA Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility.

Three of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope's science instruments were delivered to Kennedy's Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility and are now undergoing a highly sensitive cleaning process to prepare the equipment for flight. The fourth and final component will be delivered at the end of July.

Repair of Launch Pad 39A's flame trench is right on schedule. All materials needed for the refurbishment have arrived and fireproofing will begin Monday with the application of Fondu Fyre, a heat resistant concrete developed during the Apollo space program.

The STS-125 flight is the final shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA astronauts will install new instruments, gyros, batteries and other components crucial to the telescope’s continued success through the year 2013.
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Old 08-03-2008, 03:20 PM   #13
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Training and Testing on Tap

Image above: At Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A, workers spray a heat-resistant concrete into steel grid structures, welded to the wall of the flame trench. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller
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August 1, 2008
At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Vehicle Assembly Building workers continue to prepare for Sunday's planned joining of space shuttle Atlantis' external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters.

The Hubble Space Telescope's Fine Guidance Sensor and final payload carrier called the Multi-Use Lightweight Equipment carrier, or MULE, are scheduled for delivery Monday and Tuesday respectively, to Kennedy's Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility where they will be processed for flight.

Out on Launch Pad 39A, repairs to the flame trench are close to completion. Workers are touching up the last of the heat-resistant material called Fondu Fyre on the walls. The trench repair work is expected to end Wednesday.

Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-126 mission crew members are wrapping up a few days of training at Kennedy. The astronauts are performing their crew equipment interface test, which gives them an opportunity to handle and inspect the flight hardware they'll be using on their mission to the International Space Station. Launch for STS-126 is targeted for Nov. 10.

The STS-125 crew members close out their week at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston by debriefing three days of simulated training for the Hubble servicing mission.

During the STS-125 mission, NASA astronauts will install new instruments on the telescope, including the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. A refurbished Fine Guidance Sensor will replace one unit of three now on board.

Crew members will also install new gyroscopes, batteries and thermal blankets on the telescope enhancing the abilities of Hubble for several more years of service. Launch is targeted for Oct. 8.
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Old 08-04-2008, 05:44 PM   #14
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I think the mission patch is the best so far of any shuttle mission.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:17 PM   #15
Hartmann
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I´m agree.
is the most interesting mission of the space shuttle and a huge challenge.

i hope that they don´t need the backup shuttle for a rescue mission.
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