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Old 08-05-2011, 05:21 PM   #76
SandroSalgueiro
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Handshake time.
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Old 08-05-2011, 05:26 PM   #77
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Past the helium cycle issues, a perfect launch in every way. Godspeed Juno!

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Old 08-05-2011, 05:31 PM   #78
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Great launch - Atlas V proves its reliability once more! Now, let's get humans atop it.
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Old 08-05-2011, 05:51 PM   #80
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The precise liftoff time for today's launch was 16:25:00.146 UTC / 12:25:00.146 p.m. EDT.



NASA / NASA JPL:
CBS News Space: Juno launched on long voyage to Jupiter


Spaceflight Now: Juno spacecraft leaves Earth for its journey to Jupiter


A couple of launch photos:
Click on images to enlarge
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Old 08-05-2011, 08:39 PM   #82
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Very nice launch, nice launch vehicle and very interesting data.

Be the with Juno during it's long trip, Jupiter isn't exactly next door !
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:53 PM   #83
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So it's still in a low-energy orbit compared to Jupiter's and will only reach it's final dV after the Earth fly-by. Right?
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Old 08-05-2011, 11:03 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SandroSalgueiro View Post
 So it's still in a low-energy orbit compared to Jupiter's and will only reach it's final dV after the Earth fly-by. Right?
Yes, the only way Juno will have enough energy to make it to Jupiter is to use Earth's gravity to slingshot it. Juno will break some speed records after that too.
Doesn't the spacecraft's final dV occurs when it burns up in Jupiter's atmosphere?

Last edited by Unstung; 08-05-2011 at 11:11 PM.
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Old 08-05-2011, 11:41 PM   #85
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Thanks for the explanation.

Well, yes, I meant the final dV before establishing its course to Jupiter.
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Old 08-06-2011, 01:26 AM   #86
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Wow, seeing it live was AMAZING! We watched from the Saturn V building, and could see the launch pad and rocket right from blastoff - after 40 minutes of (rather worrying) holds, we finally saw it light up and liftoff. It was really exciting to hear the countdown, see it take off, and then to feel the ground start shaking and hear the rumbling, crackling noise! I managed to film it by just leaving my camera on a tripod while I watched, but will have to wait until I get home to upload it.

The atmosphere was great too - everyone cheering and joining in the count, and also good to talk to during the holds! Really something.
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Old 08-06-2011, 02:28 PM   #87
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Nice photos of the launch in Spaceflight Now galleries below -

Spaceflight Now:
SPACE.com: After 'Phenomenal' Launch to Jupiter, Long Wait Begins, Scientists Say

Florida Today: Post-shuttle Jupiter journey hauls in the space hype

RIA Novosti: NASA launches Juno probe to explore Jupiter
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Old 08-06-2011, 04:30 PM   #88
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This mission is popular with the masses for several reasons.

#1 - Everybody knows the biggest planet - Jupiter. Just as 'famous' as Mars and Saturn.

#2 - In today's world of high-priced energy and eco-awareness - a solar powered rocket seems pretty cool! We're not polluting space with garbage or radiation. And a hybrid-solar rocket takes less gas.

#3 - The general idea of the mission is to determine how the Earth and Sun were made! That's better than the work being done by some stupid cosmic ray mapping satellite.

#4 - The rocket is the fastest thing in town, blasting at speeds of 160,000mph or more.

#5 - Armored radiation shields? Sounds big, burly, and nasty. Unstoppable.

#6 - "JUNO" is simple 4-letter word, easily remembered by the masses. It is also a tough-sounding name.

Last edited by Keatah; 08-06-2011 at 09:53 PM.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:44 PM   #89
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Didn't get to attend the launch, but I did see the probe as well as the centaur upper stage last night. Fortunately, simply regressing the pre-launch trajectory data to account for the launch delay actually worked. I was thinking an hour delay shouldn't change the ejection burn too badly.
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Old 08-07-2011, 09:50 AM   #90
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Quote:
#6 - "JUNO" is simple 4-letter word, easily remembered by the masses. It is also a tough-sounding name.
Er... maybe.



For years whenever I've read "Juno", I think of this film.
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