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Old 11-21-2017, 02:26 PM   #31
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The terrestrial telescopes have not been able to see directly the shape of this small body due to its remoteness, but if you ask how we know its approximate shape, it is easy: in the same way that it is estimated with most asteroids, that is, seeing its light curve.

Oumuamua has a rotation period of 7.34 hours, a value that is not uncommon in asteroids of this size, but the high contrast of the light curve implies a very elongated shape or a dramatic albedo difference. Occam's razor makes astronomers opt for the first option, since it is easier to explain a homogeneous surface composition, although evidently the light curve could be the result of both factors. In any case, we must insist that we do not know the true form of Oumuamua and we can only work with estimates. Of course, if it really is a kind of very long cosmic splinter, it would have to be formed predominantly by rock and metal in order to withstand the structural tensions.


Oumuamua has a rotation period of 7.34 hours, a value that is not uncommon in asteroids of this size, but the high contrast of the light curve implies a very elongated shape or a dramatic albedo difference. Occam's razor makes astronomers opt for the first option, since it is easier to explain a homogeneous surface composition, although evidently the light curve could be the result of both factors. In any case, we must insist that we do not know the true form of Oumuamua and we can only work with estimates. Of course, if it really is a kind of very long cosmic splinter, it would have to be formed predominantly by rock and metal in order to withstand the structural tensions.

The VLT together with the Hawaii CFHT telescope (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) have provided fundamental information about the nature of this visitor to the stars. The first and most important thing is that its interstellar nature is confirmed. The'Omuuamua orbit - which in Hawaiian means 'messenger that comes from afar and arrives first' - has an eccentricity of 1.188 with a very high statistical confidence (300σ). Second, neither the VLT nor the CFHT, nor the GST (Gemini South Telescope), have been able to detect a comma around the body despite its enormous resolution, so it is also confirmed the absence of volatiles -hols- in the surface of Oumuamua. That is, it is a body rich in rocks and metals


We are free, this time, from visits of a heavy visit at home

Last edited by perseus; 11-21-2017 at 10:12 PM.
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Old 11-21-2017, 09:47 PM   #32
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  has an eccentricity of 1,188
Wait, is that "one thousand, one hundred eighty-eight", or "one point one eight eight"?
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Old 11-21-2017, 10:11 PM   #33
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 Wait, is that "one thousand, one hundred eighty-eight", or "one point one eight eight"?


"one point one eight eight"
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Old 11-21-2017, 10:25 PM   #34
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 Wait, is that "one thousand, one hundred eighty-eight", or "one point one eight eight"?
That's how they do it in most of the world. The U.S. is weird in many ways.
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Old 11-21-2017, 10:30 PM   #35
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 "one point one eight eight"
No, it's one comma one eight eight ;-)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_mark
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Old 11-21-2017, 11:08 PM   #36
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 That's how they do it in most of the world. The U.S. is weird in many ways.
Yeah, I figured.

And this is one of the things the US does correct, IMO. A decimal point should be a decimal point not a decimal comma!
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Old 11-21-2017, 11:33 PM   #37
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 Yeah, I figured.

And this is one of the things the US does correct, IMO. A decimal point should be a decimal point not a decimal comma!
Which is a hen and egg problem. What was first point or decimal point?
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Old 11-21-2017, 11:59 PM   #38
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And this is one of the things the US does correct, IMO. A decimal point should be a decimal point not a decimal comma!
And it never occured to you that in other languages it might not be called a point, but a comma?
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Old 11-22-2017, 12:18 AM   #39
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The . is that it's not the . if it's a , or a ..
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Old 11-22-2017, 01:23 AM   #40
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 Which is a hen and egg problem. What was first point or decimal point?
All the answers lie aboard the object passing through our solar system, and sadly we cannot catch up to it...
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Old 11-22-2017, 04:00 AM   #41
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 A decimal point should be a decimal point not a decimal comma!
Huh.
TIL that there are countries that use comma as a decimal point.
That does sound like the kind of crime against common sense that is typical to USA, however.
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Old 11-22-2017, 10:08 AM   #42
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 All the answers lie aboard the object passing through our solar system, and sadly we cannot catch up to it...
We could... well, in theory. In reality, solving the political issues will take so much time that the asteroid will be in another star system already.
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Old 11-22-2017, 02:40 PM   #43
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e=1188/1000 hehe without shadows with light in the mind, He who wants to understand it, understands it anyway.

another notation is 1'188 for the one who wants to entangle with simplicities.
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:30 PM   #44
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To be pedantic, on my mother tongue the correct way to write 1000 with decimals (on a price for example) is:

1.000,00

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Old 11-23-2017, 02:35 AM   #45
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 To be pedantic, on my mother tongue the correct way to write 1000 with decimals (on a price for example) is:

1.000,00

Well. as long as it's consistent. it's easy enough to figure out in context,
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