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Old 01-01-2012, 02:37 AM   #16
Arrowstar
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Regarding the science orbit, is there a maximum inclination you guys are thinking about? Is 45 degrees sufficient for the science? 60 degrees? I need to know this.
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Old 01-01-2012, 02:44 AM   #17
Lord Wasteland
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Okay, so for the landers, maybe we can try at a slight increase of weight, add specific science experiments to be included for reentry. Or, we can pack the experiments in the XR2 after release, so when it lands, the experiments are off-loaded and begin experimentation.
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:54 AM   #18
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Or you can just use
This?


You can send out a "probe", then use it to relay information from the probe to gather atmospheric data ?

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For vessels with their own dll, there are better ways to implement this, but for SpacecraftN.dll based vessels this provides a way to simulate atmospheric probes without any coding
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:57 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Luke Skywalker View Post
 Or you can just use This?

You can send out a "probe", then use it to relay information from the probe to gather atmospheric data ?
You can use an UMMU instead. But wouldn't the composition, etc of the Martian atmosphere be known beforehand?
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:16 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Wasteland View Post
 Okay, so for the landers, maybe we can try at a slight increase of weight, add specific science experiments to be included for reentry. Or, we can pack the experiments in the XR2 after release, so when it lands, the experiments are off-loaded and begin experimentation.
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 Or you can just use This?

You can send out a "probe", then use it to relay information from the probe to gather atmospheric data ?
Check the missions list. There are landers and supplies already planned. The landers will check the sites and act as weather stations and the supplies drop will include experiment packages to be used by the landing humans at a later date.
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Old 01-03-2012, 10:42 PM   #21
Lord Wasteland
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Alright, so we have the planned out transfer, location to land, et cetera, what kind of science payload are we expecting? Equipment to analyze the soil, radiation detectors, any existing rovers that are still alive on Mars, any orbital satellites (not recently launched) what so ever? By the launch period, we should have MSL, MAVEN (if not canceled), and some other satellites. If somehow Opportunity does survive (and can be recovered), why not bring her home. At only 408lbs/185kg, it wouldn't be that much to bring her home. A slight fuel increase, but after all she will have been important, and probably can fit inside a XR-2 cargo-bay on reentry.
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Old 01-03-2012, 10:49 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Lord Wasteland View Post
 Alright, so we have the planned out transfer, location to land, et cetera,
We have? Where has the landing LOCATION be specified anywhere?

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 If somehow Opportunity does survive (and can be recovered), why not bring her home. At only 408lbs/185kg, it wouldn't be that much to bring her home.
Why would you when a small part of a landed rover would be lighter and provide the exact same science gain? Besides which I would have thought that a dead rover would give more of a science gain than a live one. If it's alive, leave it alone to keep working.

Are there any landers within the specified equatorial region?

Last edited by garyw; 01-03-2012 at 11:02 PM.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:20 PM   #23
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I was the one who brought up the rovers, since it would not only be 'cool' but there's a lot we could learn from them. Anyways, a weather balloon would be torn to shreds in a dust storm, and materials strong enough to survive that kind of abuse, are too heavy to be lifted.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:23 PM   #24
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 I was the one who brought up the rovers, since it would not only be 'cool' but there's a lot we could learn from them.
Sure, Is there a dead lander (not necessarily a rover) within the landing path? i.e. the +/- 10 degress of eqautor?

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 Anyways, a weather balloon would be torn to shreds in a dust storm, and materials strong enough to survive that kind of abuse, are too heavy to be lifted.
Wrong. A dust storm on Mars is nothing in terms of air pressure because the air is so thin. What it's more likely to do is wreck the electronics but then why would you launch such a device when there is a dust storm nearby?
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:51 AM   #25
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 Sure, Is there a dead lander (not necessarily a rover) within the landing path? i.e. the +/- 10 degress of eqautor?
Opportunity is currently at Endeavour crater, which location is around 2.25S 354.77E and Curiosity lands somewhere in Gale crater (5.44S 137.70E)
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:57 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by garyw View Post
  What it's more likely to do is wreck the electronics but then why would you launch such a device when there is a dust storm nearby?
I was thinking more of a long term probe, something farther from the base, I.E. 5-10 KM for weather studies, or whatever you can come up with...maybe even close up terrain mapping, thus it would be a free floating balloon, and be even farther away. Im figuring that weight is supposed to be reduced, and balloons like what im talking about, are heavy. So, you wont be carrying too many of them to replace one thats ripped up in a storm
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Old 01-04-2012, 02:40 AM   #27
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The key science goals has got to be rocks and searching for life. The benefit of sending human beings is the ability to quickly scan the area, get be able to get access to rocks not easily gotten with rovers. The ability to train the crew in geology so they can work with a degree of autonomy to get samples with the best chance of a result, answering the important questions regarding the Martian history. To build on the knowledge we have already amassed from the unmanned rovers. And of course, the first martian sample return.

my 2 cents
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Old 01-04-2012, 06:16 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by mojoey View Post
 I was the one who brought up the rovers, since it would not only be 'cool' but there's a lot we could learn from them.
The way I understood that sentence was that 'you can learn a lot about how electronics and mechanical parts get worn out by extended stay on another planet', so if you meant it in any other way, ignore the last paragraph.

Landing on a site previously explored by a robotic mission would be quite a waste of resources. Even though the robotic mission has limited capabilities, it has already swept the area and explored it. Returning to that site would mean the amount of science you can do is diminished, by the science already done by the robotic mission.

As for learning how the material copes with long term exposure... you should already know that BEFORE going to Mars. You had to design equipment capable of surviving extended use on Mars, so checking out how a rover or lander coped after you've reached Mars is kind of pointless.
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Old 01-04-2012, 07:03 AM   #29
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Simply put, it was meant as a souvenir, of little scientific importance. Perhaps, learning from what happened to the rovers. I never thought the idea would get off the ground like it did, but you can learn from a dead piece of junk. Maybe some lifeform hitched a ride. The way I see it, learning from things like the rovers, and various probes, though insignificant, could prove useful down the line.

However, im most likely wrong... and going to retrieve a rover or lander is a waste of time.
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Old 01-04-2012, 08:19 AM   #30
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Mmm, I wouldn't think it would be a complete waste of time. All kinds of things could be learned from the rovers long-term exposure to Martian elements, and construction of long-term habitats would benifit from that knowledge.
But, I don't think it'd be a primary mission... But if another science gathering mission put us in the neighborhood of, say Sojoiner, then we could approach, photograph in-situ, recover and preserve it for study. I'd be more difficult than a "bag-ang-tag", but perhaps something that can be accomplished as a secondary objective.
I'm sure the Smithsonian would like to get ahold of it once the lab-coated guys are through.
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