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Old 02-14-2020, 09:15 AM   #736
Notebook
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February 13, 2020
New Horizons Team Discovers a Critical Piece of the Planetary Formation Puzzle

Data from NASA's New Horizons mission are providing new insights into how planets and planetesimals – the building blocks of the planets – were formed.
The New Horizons spacecraft flew past the ancient Kuiper Belt object Arrokoth (2014 MU69) on Jan. 1, 2019, providing humankind's first close-up look at one of the icy remnants of solar system formation in the vast region beyond the orbit of Neptune. Using detailed data on the object's shape, geology, color and composition – gathered during a record-setting flyby that occurred more than four billion miles from Earth – researchers have apparently answered a longstanding question about planetesimal origins, and therefore made a major advance in understanding how the planets themselves formed.
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/...?page=20200213

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-51295365

Last edited by Notebook; 02-15-2020 at 10:19 AM.
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