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Old 03-28-2018, 07:21 PM   #1
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Default Hubble News 2018+

I couldn't find a dedicated Hubble thread, so here's one.

Quote:
28 March 2018
An international team of researchers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and several other observatories have, for the first time, uncovered a galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood that is missing most if not all of its dark matter. This discovery of the galaxy NGC 1052-DF2 challenges currently-accepted theories of and galaxy formation and provides new insights into the nature of dark matter. The results are published in Nature.
http://sci.esa.int/hubble/60113-hubb...tter-heic1806/

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Old 03-29-2018, 07:00 AM   #2
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-43543195

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Ghostly galaxy may be missing dark matter
By Mary Halton
Science reporter, BBC News
28 March 2018
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Old 03-29-2018, 07:03 AM   #3
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I suspect that there is no thread for Hubble news because at this point, discoveries made by Hubble go beyond the spacecraft itself. Also, it is often used in conjunction with other observation methods.

Is there a thread dedicated to dark matter?
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Old 03-29-2018, 01:15 PM   #4
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Hubble also doesn't maneuver and isn't getting any more Shuttle love.

Plus it's been humming along quietly doing its job, which at this point has lost some glamour while attention has moved on to New Horizons, SpaceX spectacular rocket stunts, etc.
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Old 04-04-2018, 09:05 AM   #5
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Quote:
02 April 2018
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found the most distant star ever discovered. The hot blue star existed only 4.4 billion years after the Big Bang. This discovery provides new insight into the formation and evolution of stars in the early Universe, the constituents of galaxy clusters and also on the nature of dark matter.
http://sci.esa.int/hubble/60140-hubb...rved-heic1807/
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