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Old 10-16-2017, 02:20 PM   #1
Urwumpe
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Default First observation of a Kilonova event

Looks like the rumors before the Nobel Prize awards had been right: The gravity wave detectors picked up two merging neutron stars and observatories in the world confirmed it. The event took place in the Hydra constellation near NGC 4993.

There is a life stream on Youtube running right now to present the results worldwide:



The press release can be found here:

https://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1733/

This is really the first observation of such an event and quite remarkable, since the observations also confirm theories about the nuclear processes inside neutron stars.
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Old 10-16-2017, 03:43 PM   #2
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16 October 2017
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has observed for the first time the source of a gravitational wave, created by the merger of two neutron stars. This merger created a kilonova – an object predicted by theory decades ago – that ejects heavy elements such as gold and platinum into space. This event also provides the strongest evidence yet that short duration gamma-ray bursts are caused by mergers of neutron stars. This discovery is the first glimpse of multi-messenger astronomy, bringing together both gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation.
http://sci.esa.int/hubble/59672-hubb...time-heic1717/
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Old 10-16-2017, 07:13 PM   #3
Linguofreak
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First glimpse of multi-messenger astronomy? What about the neutrino observations from SN1987a?
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Old 10-17-2017, 12:16 AM   #4
Andy44
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Currently enjoying the smooth jazz of the live stream...

But fantastic science news, great times we live in.
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Old 10-18-2017, 05:12 PM   #5
Marg
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I was at LIGO observatory in Washington state 4 days after - on August 21, 2017!
During tour nothing was said, but somehow it could be felt, that they know something
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Old 10-18-2017, 05:42 PM   #6
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Old 10-18-2017, 06:38 PM   #7
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We now live in a time comparable to the moment when Galileo Galilei first turned his telescope to the moons of Jupiter and saw the universe in a way never before seen by human eyes.

He helped lay the foundation for the prosperity we enjoy today. What will we leave for our descendants?
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Old 10-19-2017, 01:27 AM   #8
ADSWNJ
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Originally Posted by RisingFury View Post
 He helped lay the foundation for the prosperity we enjoy today. What will we leave for our descendants?
We (humankind) have left them the means to detect warps in space-time. I mean ... it's a start, eh?
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