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Old 06-14-2012, 05:02 PM   #76
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NASA / NASA JPL:
First Flight Instrument Delivered for James Webb Space Telescope

June 14, 2012

GREENBELT, Md. -- The first of four instruments to fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) has been delivered to NASA. The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) will allow scientists to study cold and distant objects in greater detail than ever before.

MIRI arrived at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. on May 29. It has been undergoing inspection before being integrated into Webb's science instrument payload known as the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM).

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The MIRI Cleanroom Huddle: Although it appears that these six contamination control engineers are in a huddle around the James Webb Space Telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument (or MIRI), they are conducting a receiving inspection. Engineers from the European Space Agency are wearing blue hoods, and engineers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center are wearing the white hoods. As part of the standard receiving inspection, they are looking for the tiniest traces of dust or contamination which would have to be remedied because cleanliness is a priority for such a sensitive instrument; MIRI passed its inspection review.
Image credit: NASA/Chris Gunn
The Mid-Infrared Instrument undergoing alignment testing at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Space in Oxfordshire, U.K.
Credit: RAL


Assembled at and shipped from the Science and Technology Facilities Council's Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom, MIRI was developed by a consortium of 10 European institutions and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., and delivered by the European Space Agency.

George Rieke, MIRI science team lead at the University of Arizona, Tucson, noted, "MIRI is the first Webb instrument to be delivered, the result of teamwork in the U.S. and internationally."

MIRI will observe light with wavelengths in the mid-infrared range of 5 microns to 28 microns, which is a longer wavelength than human eyes can detect. It is the only instrument of the four with this particular ability to observe the physical processes occurring in the cosmos.

"MIRI will enable Webb to distinguish the oldest galaxies from more evolved objects that have undergone several cycles of star birth and death," said Matt Greenhouse, ISIM project scientist at Goddard. "MIRI also will provide a unique window into the birth places of stars which are typically enshrouded by dust that shorter wavelength light cannot penetrate."

MIRI's sensitive detectors will allow it to observe light, cool stars in very distant galaxies; unveil newly forming stars within our Milky Way; find signatures of the formation of planets around stars other than our own; and take imagery and spectroscopy of planets, comets and the outermost bits of debris in our solar system. MIRI's images will enable scientists to study an object's shape and structure.

"MIRI will help us understand what's out there at the edge of what we can see," said Mike Ressler, the instrument's project scientist at JPL. "The shorter-wavelength instruments will discover the glow of the farthest known objects, but we need MIRI to help identify what they are -- supermassive black holes, newborn galaxies or something we've never seen before."

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NASA Press Release: RELEASE : 12-198 - First Flight Instrument Delivered For James Webb Space Telescope
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Old 06-29-2012, 01:57 PM   #77
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NASA:
NASA's 'Webb-Cam' Has Double Vision for MIRI's Arrival

June 29, 2012

NASA's special "Webb-cam," the camera in a giant clean room at NASA Goddard, now has "double vision," because there are two video cameras now focusing on what's happening with the very first completed instrument that will fly onboard the James Webb Space Telescope. Recently, there's been a lot to look at because the MIRI instrument arrived at Goddard from the United Kingdom.

These aren't just typical webcams, they're "Webb-cams" because they're focused on the progress of work being done on components of the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope in the largest clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

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This is an image taken from one of NASA’s two special "Webb-cams,” a camera in a giant clean room at NASA Goddard. The Webb-cams focus on what's happening with the very first completed instrument that will fly onboard the James Webb Space Telescope. The flight Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) is at left center. The Ambient Optical Assembly Stand is on the right side of the image.
Credit: NASA
Three engineers from the European Space Agency wearing blue hood are investigating the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) that recently arrived at NASA Goddard’s clean room. The MIRI sees light in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Keep watching the Webb-cams, and the MIRI will likely be moved into view soon.
Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn


"We now have two webcams in the Building 29 clean room at Goddard, one showing the left side and one showing the right," said Maggie Masetti, Web Developer on the Webb telescope mission at NASA Goddard. "The screenshots on-line are updated every minute. The clean room is generally occupied from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time in the U.S., Monday through Friday. There may not be much activity outside of these hours." The Webb-cam can be seen on-line at: http://jwst.nasa.gov/webcam.html.

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NASA JWST: Watch the Webb In Progress on our "Webb-cam"!

Images below are automatically updated in intervals. To see changes refresh the page.



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Old 07-02-2012, 05:22 PM   #78
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SPACE.com: NASA's Next Big Space Telescope Gets 1st Delivery
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Old 07-05-2012, 04:09 PM   #79
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NASA: Scanning Webb’s Surrogate Eye


Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn
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Old 07-19-2012, 02:54 PM   #80
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NASA: Meet the Faces Behind the MIRI - Part 1: Wright, Goodson, Glasse and Ressler

NASA JPL: Meet a Face Behind the MIRI
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Old 07-27-2012, 05:05 PM   #82
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NASA: New Video Brings a 'Golden Touch' Behind the Webb

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NASA engineer Ernie Wright looks on as the first six flight ready James Webb Space Telescope's primary mirror segments are prepped to begin final cryogenic testing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
Credit: NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/David Higginbotham

The gold layer coating, only a few millionths of an inch thick, enables the mirrors to best reflect the infrared light the telescope seeks.
Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Chris Gunn


HubbleSite: Behind the Webb Video Podcast
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Old 08-13-2012, 04:58 PM   #83
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NASA: Second Flight Instrument Delivered for James Webb Space Telescope:
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The second of four main instruments to fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) has been delivered to NASA. The Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) will enable the telescope to accurately and precisely point at the correct, intended objects for it to observe. The FGS is packaged together as a single unit with the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) science instrument.

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The Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) and Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph combined undergoing cryogenic testing.
Credit: COM DEV Canada

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Old 08-20-2012, 02:17 PM   #84
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Discover Magazine - Bad Astronomy: James Webb Space Telescope’s primary mirror is ready to go!

And some photos in Phil Plait's Flickr photostream

SPACE.com: Mirrors Finished for NASA's New James Webb Space Telescope
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Old 09-24-2012, 10:18 PM   #85
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NASA: First Two Webb Telescope Flight Mirrors Delivered to NASA


Technicians and scientists check out one of the Webb telescope's first two flight mirrors in the clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn



This photo shows one of the two mirrors, while the other awaits opening in its shipping canister. The mirrors have arrived at their new home at NASA, where they will be residing at the giant cleanroom at Goddard for a while as technicians check them out.
Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn




SpaceRef: First Two Webb Telescope Flight Mirrors Delivered
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Old 09-25-2012, 10:47 AM   #86
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Can someone explain, why the reflection in the mirror in the second picture is not inverted?Perspective looks correct though. First guess would be its geometry, but the first image was taken from a similar angle and yet that one look normal. Seems a bit weird, doesn't it?
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Old 09-25-2012, 04:50 PM   #87
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In the second picture, the camera was beyond the mirror's focal point, thus the inverted image.
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:19 AM   #88
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Makes sense, thanks.
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Old 10-02-2012, 05:04 PM   #89
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NASA: Blanketing NASA's Webb Telescope's Science Instrument Electronics


Engineers Josh Lutter (on the right), Bruce Haines (center) and Scott Lam (on the left) tuck layers of blanketing in-between the gold-colored louvers on the James Webb Space Telescope's Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Electronics Compartment (IEC) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The blanketing insulates and shields the flight instruments and the louvers will keep heat away from the temperature-sensitive instruments that will peer through dust clouds to see how stars form.
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Old 10-02-2012, 06:42 PM   #90
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You don't want to drop an eyebrow hair there...
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