Orbiter-Forum  

Go Back   Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Spaceflight News
Register Blogs Orbinauts List Social Groups FAQ Projects Mark Forums Read

Spaceflight News Share news, stories, or discussions about government and private spaceflight programs; including ESA, ISS, NASA, Russian Space Program, Virgin Galactic, & more!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-22-2008, 10:43 PM   #61
Bj
Donator
 
Bj's Avatar

Default

$55,000 per pound of payload to get into orbit.

source - > http://www.spacedaily.com


270KG == ~595.24Pounds

595.24 * 55,000 = LOTS OF MONEY!!!! $32 Million for the white et's.

(correct me if I am wrong)
Bj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2008, 10:52 PM   #62
ryan
That guy
 
ryan's Avatar
Default

I wouldnt know if your wrong or right.
ryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 02:04 PM   #63
James.Denholm
Addon ponderer
Default

You want to know what I found curious? In the photos, no-one's upside-down or anything. This can mean only 1 of 3 things:

1. They have a system of which way is down, and can't be bothered with being different.

2. It's a hoax.

3. It's a hoax. Mainly because I forgot point 2 while typing point 1, and hence point 3 became point 2...
James.Denholm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 02:16 PM   #64
pete.dakota
Donator
 
pete.dakota's Avatar
Default

Well it certainly isn't a hoax.

As the astronauts are constantly working and communicating with each other, naturally they will manoeuvre themselves to be in relative position to their crew mates as they would down on Earth. So that's heads "up", feet "down." Even though there is, technically, no up and down in space. On the station however, laptops and equipment and the like are placed so to simulate a room where there is an floor and there is a ceiling. I believe one module of the ISS actually has a carpet (I'm sure I've heard this somewhere).

It makes it easier for the crew to work with each other and interface with the systems if there is some general logic behind what is up and what is down inside the modules.
pete.dakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 02:21 PM   #65
Urwumpe
Certain Super User
 
Urwumpe's Avatar

Default

The ISS has up and down defined inside the modules by colors and labels for reducing the risk of space motion sickness (The whole strategy is called 1G orientation)
Urwumpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2008, 10:55 PM   #66
ryan
That guy
 
ryan's Avatar
Default

In luanch there are a number of call outs, but what does press2meco mean?
ryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2008, 11:00 PM   #67
Urwumpe
Certain Super User
 
Urwumpe's Avatar

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan View Post
 In luanch there are a number of call outs, but what does press2meco mean?
"Press to MECO" = When a single engine fails, don't abort, but fly to a nominal MECO. (At 104% SSME thrust)

There is also "SE PRESS (104)" which is the same, but for the failure of a second SSME.
Urwumpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2008, 11:03 PM   #68
ryan
That guy
 
ryan's Avatar
Default

Ohhhh i get it now, thanks
ryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2008, 11:34 PM   #69
xmariox
Addon Developer
 
xmariox's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 David Griggs, STS-51-D, died in 1989, killed in a crash with a historic WW2 training plane.
Karl Gordon Henize, STS-51-F, died in 1993, because of heart failure while climbing Mount Everest.
Robert F Overmyer, STS-5 and STS-51-B, died 1996, in a crash while testing the Cirrus VK-30 light aircraft.
Charles L Veach, STS-39 and STS-52, died of cancer in 1995.
David M Walker, STS-51-A, STS-30, STS-53 and STS-69, died in 2001, after a brief and sudden illness.
Charles Eldon Brady, STS-78, died in July 2006, uncleared details of death, probably suicide due painful ailment of Arthritis.
xmariox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2008, 12:18 AM   #70
Pilot7893
Epik spaec mishun!
 
Pilot7893's Avatar
Default

Why did they design the shuttle with such small wings? Was it so they didn't rip off from atmospheric pressure during launch and reentry?
Pilot7893 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2008, 08:49 AM   #71
Urwumpe
Certain Super User
 
Urwumpe's Avatar

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot7893 View Post
 Why did they design the shuttle with such small wings? Was it so they didn't rip off from atmospheric pressure during launch and reentry?
The Shuttle has rather large wings. They had become so large because it should be able to have a huge cross range (maximum distance on the ground from the initial orbit plane) during reentry with a huge payload in it's payload bay. Initially, it should have been able to have a cross range of 1500 NM, so it can land on the same spaceport after a single orbit, but they finally settled on over 1050 NM, which it has now.

Without these requirements, the Shuttle could have flown with much smaller wings.

The loads during reentry are actually pretty harmless compared to what other planes have to take. The wing loading of a shuttle during a high energy reentry is 422.6 kg/m. That's even less as the F-16 with it's smaller wings has.
Urwumpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2008, 11:51 PM   #72
Pilot7893
Epik spaec mishun!
 
Pilot7893's Avatar
Default

Does the ISS have some sort of autopilot to keep it's global orientation with Earth the same? If so, is THAT why whenever I try to dock, I have to change to ROT every .5 seconds to keep level with the docking port?
Pilot7893 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2008, 12:24 AM   #73
ryan
That guy
 
ryan's Avatar
Default

Isnt the ISS in a sortof bank, to keep a little gravity in there, i suppos thats inplaced into orbiter as well.
ryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2008, 07:09 AM   #74
Urwumpe
Certain Super User
 
Urwumpe's Avatar

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan View Post
 Isnt the ISS in a sortof bank, to keep a little gravity in there, i suppos thats inplaced into orbiter as well.
Wrong.

1. It is no bank, but actually pitch.
2. It is not for keeping gravity in the ISS. That is impossible in freefall. Actually, they do hard work in some flight phases to avoid any residual gravity.
3. That mode is called gravity gradient stabilization, and works by the fact, that the gravity pull on mass closer to earth is higher than on objects further away. When a object is long enough and the mass of the object distributed along one axis, the gravity difference between the low and the high end of it is enough for keeping a object stabilized in space. That applies to the ISS (the heavy modules form one line), the space shuttle (pressure shell, payloads and engines are forming one line) or many rocket stages.
4. During docking, the ISS is in a LVLH stabilized mode, meaning that the Shuttle docking port is always pointing forward or the Service module docking port always pointing backwards. That is done for saving fuel on the docking spacecraft.
Urwumpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2008, 08:03 AM   #75
Linguofreak
Orbinaut
Default

What kind of internet access do they get on the ISS/Shuttle? Any?
Linguofreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Spaceflight News

Tags
center, control, eva, mcc, mission


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:27 AM.

Quick Links Need Help?


About Us | Rules & Guidelines | TOS Policy | Privacy Policy

Orbiter-Forum is hosted at Orbithangar.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2017, Orbiter-Forum.com. All rights reserved.