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  1. Old Comment

    A Saga Ends; An Adventure Begins

    Congratulations! A new pilot is Orbinaut!
    Remind to the crew to worship the Probe.
    Posted 06-22-2016 at 06:41 PM by Matias Saibene Matias Saibene is offline
  2. Old Comment
    n122vu's Avatar

    A Saga Ends; An Adventure Begins

    Thanks! I'm glad my ramblings have inspired someone. If nothing else, one of the biggest points I hope I've conveyed is don't give up. No matter how long you have to wait between lessons due to money, the plane, weather, or anything else, no matter how bad you think a lesson has gone or how rattled or frustrated you get, don't give up. It will be worth it in the end. Believe it or not, the delays prepared me. I've only flown 3 times since my checkride, and having the delays prepared me for how rusty I would be with all that time in between, which in turn makes me less frustrated at myself for being so rusty. I'll be flying more often though soon, but that's another blog entry...
    Posted 06-21-2016 at 12:42 PM by n122vu n122vu is offline
  3. Old Comment
    IronRain's Avatar

    A Saga Ends; An Adventure Begins

    Wow! Congratulations! I've been following your blogs from the beginning and I am really happy for you!

    This is a childhood dream of me too. I really hope that I can accomplish the same thing someday. Your blogs encouraged me to go for it... when I have the money though

    Safe flights and have fun!

    Derk
    Posted 06-20-2016 at 07:37 PM by IronRain IronRain is offline
  4. Old Comment
    MaverickSawyer's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fabri91 View Comment
    1. Yes, and the fact that only some engines are (mechanically) fuel injected in 2015, added to the use of leaded gasoline and complete lack of exhaust gas treatment is apalling.
    2. By this standard we'd still have cars started with a hand-crank: "my engine only eats a liter of oil every dozen hours, it's fine". Maybe we're spoilt by modern automotive engines, but when was the last time that anyone's seen a decently maintained car have a more than negligible oil consumption?

    I remember reading many years ago about some automotive diesel engines being adapted for light aircraft use, but that still seems to be a very small niche at best, from what I can gather.
    Yep. Diamond Aircraft uses modified Mercedes Benz engines for some of their aircraft. The biggest change is installing an FAA-certified FADEC and some minor tweaks to optimize the engine's performance while running on Jet-A.
    Posted 12-22-2015 at 04:56 PM by MaverickSawyer MaverickSawyer is offline
  5. Old Comment
    Fabri91's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MaverickSawyer View Comment
    Two ways of looking at this:
    1. Institutional inertia: the FAA is VERY resistant to change.
    2. Proven technology: There's been a respectable track record of success with these engines. The manufacturers are very much of a "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" mindset.
    1. Yes, and the fact that only some engines are (mechanically) fuel injected in 2015, added to the use of leaded gasoline and complete lack of exhaust gas treatment is apalling.
    2. By this standard we'd still have cars started with a hand-crank: "my engine only eats a liter of oil every dozen hours, it's fine". Maybe we're spoilt by modern automotive engines, but when was the last time that anyone's seen a decently maintained car have a more than negligible oil consumption?

    I remember reading many years ago about some automotive diesel engines being adapted for light aircraft use, but that still seems to be a very small niche at best, from what I can gather.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MaverickSawyer View Comment
    Personally, this is why I'm planning on getting into the Experimental side of things ASAP. Much more freedom to work with new tech and ideas. I mean, where else can you power a plane with a VW Bug engine? Besides, Experimental is MUCH cheaper. No annuals, no type certs, no STCs, and LOTS of room to innovate. I mean, look at the huge number of kit birds being sold today. They range from a little dinky thing like the Bede BD-5 all the way up to the Lancair Evolution, which seats 5(?) and costs ~US$1.5 million when fully kitted out and can haul ass at over 350 knots at over FL200. There's a lot of room for new stuff there.
    Absolutely agree.
    Posted 12-22-2015 at 12:53 PM by Fabri91 Fabri91 is offline
  6. Old Comment
    MaverickSawyer's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fabri91 View Comment
    Nice read and good luck with your checkride!

    One thing I don't really understand is how GA engines seem to be stuck in the 50s/60s, technology wise...
    Two ways of looking at this:
    1. Institutional inertia: the FAA is VERY resistant to change.
    2. Proven technology: There's been a respectable track record of success with these engines. The manufacturers are very much of a "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" mindset.

    Personally, this is why I'm planning on getting into the Experimental side of things ASAP. Much more freedom to work with new tech and ideas. I mean, where else can you power a plane with a VW Bug engine? Besides, Experimental is MUCH cheaper. No annuals, no type certs, no STCs, and LOTS of room to innovate. I mean, look at the huge number of kit birds being sold today. They range from a little dinky thing like the Bede BD-5 all the way up to the Lancair Evolution, which seats 5(?) and costs ~US$1.5 million when fully kitted out and can haul ass at over 350 knots at over FL200. There's a lot of room for new stuff there.
    Posted 12-22-2015 at 05:02 AM by MaverickSawyer MaverickSawyer is offline
  7. Old Comment
    mojoey's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    You should have called this one Flight 42: The $100 Hamburger On The Other End Of The Universe
    Posted 12-22-2015 at 01:52 AM by mojoey mojoey is offline
  8. Old Comment
    n122vu's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Thanks

    As far as the engine tech, I completely agree. Well, I'll add one bit of info that I'm also going to include in the next blog post - they replaced the starter with a heavy-duty one. She starts in 1-2 cranks now, tops. It's pretty sweet.
    Posted 12-21-2015 at 07:04 PM by n122vu n122vu is offline
  9. Old Comment
    Fabri91's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Nice read and good luck with your checkride!

    One thing I don't really understand is how GA engines seem to be stuck in the 50s/60s, technology wise: for any recent car it would be almost unthinkable for the engine not to start on the first try even after weeks under the rain.
    Posted 12-21-2015 at 05:42 PM by Fabri91 Fabri91 is offline
  10. Old Comment
    n122vu's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Artlav View Comment
    Is it possible to start a modern Cessna-sized plane by hand?
    That is, the old-fashioned yank the propeller while in gear technique?

    If yes, is it something safe enough to be done outside of the stranded-in-the-bush scenarios?
    Yes, and in fact my CFI told me once how to do it, demonstrated the hand-propping motion, though it was sometime last year. He told me the steps to perform inside the cockpit to prep for the hand-prop. He said if you were ever somewhere and the starter went out, you could do it in a pinch. I suspect if the line worker or mechanic had been around they might have even tried for me.

    This possibility is in fact why we always triple-check that the magnetos are off before we move the prop to attach the tow bar. Last think you want to do is to turn the prop and have it catch & the engine fire while you're not prepared.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MaverickSawyer View Comment
    It's a pain in the ass on anything bigger than a 150/152. They're six cylinder engines, and have higher compression, so it's very hard to get it right. I would say that hand propping one is a last-ditch approach to start the engine.
    Ours is a 4-cylinder, Lycoming O-300 140 hp, so it might have been easier. Key word there being 'might.'
    Posted 12-21-2015 at 05:24 PM by n122vu n122vu is offline
  11. Old Comment
    MaverickSawyer's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Artlav View Comment
    Is it possible to start a modern Cessna-sized plane by hand?
    That is, the old-fashioned yank the propeller while in gear technique?

    If yes, is it something safe enough to be done outside of the stranded-in-the-bush scenarios?
    It's a pain in the ass on anything bigger than a 150/152. They're six cylinder engines, and have higher compression, so it's very hard to get it right. I would say that hand propping one is a last-ditch approach to start the engine.
    Posted 12-21-2015 at 04:51 PM by MaverickSawyer MaverickSawyer is offline
  12. Old Comment
    Artlav's Avatar

    Flight 42 - Almost there....

    Is it possible to start a modern Cessna-sized plane by hand?
    That is, the old-fashioned yank the propeller while in gear technique?

    If yes, is it something safe enough to be done outside of the stranded-in-the-bush scenarios?
    Posted 12-21-2015 at 04:20 PM by Artlav Artlav is offline
  13. Old Comment
    Scav's Avatar

    Flight 39 - Workin' on the Night Moves

    Picture me rubbing my hands together in anticipation -- and thanking you for the song in my head.
    Posted 11-05-2015 at 12:40 PM by Scav Scav is offline
  14. Old Comment
    n122vu's Avatar

    Flight 37 - Long Trip Alone

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Scav View Comment


    So . . . is 5.5K the highest you've gone up yet? I can only imagine the look and feel of it all (having been only maybe half that above sea level in a SEL).
    It's the highest I've been while flying solo. I believe we climbed up to 7.5k during maneuvers one lesson last fall. I don't remember going higher than that.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fabri91 View Comment
    Nice write-up!

    Hypothetically, what would happen if due to e.g. a weather diversion you'd go over the remaining hours on the aircraft? Would it be effectively grounded at the next landing or is there some leeway to, for example, ferry it home to perform maintenance?
    Excellent question, and one I'll be required to know the answer to for the checkride I'm sure. There is some leeway for the aircraft owner/operator, but not for a renting customer. If I landed past the 100-hr limit, under normal circumstances it would be immediately removed from commercial service. Meaning, as a paying rental customer I would not be able to fly it any further and would have to arrange alternate transportation home.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FAR 91.409
    (b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, no person may operate an aircraft carrying any person (other than a crewmember) for hire, and no person may give flight instruction for hire in an aircraft which that person provides, unless within the preceding 100 hours of time in service the aircraft has received an annual or 100-hour inspection and been approved for return to service in accordance with part 43 of this chapter or has received an inspection for the issuance of an airworthiness certificate in accordance with part 21 of this chapter. The 100-hour limitation may be exceeded by not more than 10 hours while en route to reach a place where the inspection can be done. The excess time used to reach a place where the inspection can be done must be included in computing the next 100 hours of time in service.
    Though as mojoey mentioned, there are situations where a provisional airworthiness certificate or special flight permit can be obtained, which must be in the aircraft at all times during the flight until the 100-hr inspection is performed.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FAR 91.409
    (c) Paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section do not apply to--
    [(1) An aircraft that carries a special flight permit, a current experimental certificate, or a light-sport or provisional airworthiness certificate;]
    Posted 10-12-2015 at 01:59 AM by n122vu n122vu is offline
  15. Old Comment
    mojoey's Avatar

    Flight 37 - Long Trip Alone

    I can't remember the specific name, but you can ring up the FAA and get a temporary Airworthiness Certificate that allows you to have someone (or yourself, if properly certified) to ferry the aircraft back to wherever it needs to be.
    Posted 10-11-2015 at 05:28 PM by mojoey mojoey is offline
  16. Old Comment
    Fabri91's Avatar

    Flight 37 - Long Trip Alone

    Nice write-up!

    Hypothetically, what would happen if due to e.g. a weather diversion you'd go over the remaining hours on the aircraft? Would it be effectively grounded at the next landing or is there some leeway to, for example, ferry it home to perform maintenance?
    Posted 10-11-2015 at 11:15 AM by Fabri91 Fabri91 is offline
  17. Old Comment
    Scav's Avatar

    Flight 37 - Long Trip Alone



    So . . . is 5.5K the highest you've gone up yet? I can only imagine the look and feel of it all (having been only maybe half that above sea level in a SEL).
    Posted 10-11-2015 at 05:05 AM by Scav Scav is offline
  18. Old Comment
    Scav's Avatar

    Flights 33 & 34 Cross-country - Working out the Kinks

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by n122vu View Comment
    (in unison with the rest) It's an entirely different kind of flying.
    Posted 09-05-2015 at 11:10 PM by Scav Scav is offline
  19. Old Comment
    n122vu's Avatar

    Flights 33 & 34 Cross-country - Working out the Kinks

    (in unison with the rest) It's an entirely different kind of flying.
    Posted 09-05-2015 at 11:03 PM by n122vu n122vu is offline
  20. Old Comment
    Scav's Avatar

    Flights 33 & 34 Cross-country - Working out the Kinks

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by n122vu View Comment
    And multi-engine just to be sure.
    Absolutely! Because after all, it's an entirely different kind of flying, altogether.
    Posted 09-05-2015 at 08:02 PM by Scav Scav is offline

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