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Old 09-20-2016, 10:52 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by Andy44 View Post
 I think it's time to re-read The Mote in God's Eye...
Fantastic Book
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Old 10-04-2016, 09:28 AM   #77
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Astronomy Now: Milky Way’s most-mysterious star is even stranger than astronomers thought
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Old 10-04-2016, 09:37 AM   #78
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Why does a 2% variation cause so much interest?

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Old 10-04-2016, 09:47 AM   #79
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 Why does a 2% variation cause so much interest?

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Because 2% is a lot in just four years, when speaking about stars.

For example, the sun needs 100 million years for a 1% increase in luminosity.
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Old 10-04-2016, 09:58 AM   #80
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Could be gone in 50 years then?

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Old 10-04-2016, 10:11 AM   #81
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 Could be gone in 50 years then?
I would have said no, if it is about another star.
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Old 10-04-2016, 12:39 PM   #82
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From article:
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“It’s a big challenge to come up with a good natural explanation for a star doing three different things that have never been seen before,” Montet said. “But these observations will provide an important clue to solving the mystery of KIC 8462852.”
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Old 10-04-2016, 04:33 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by Urwumpe View Post
 Because 2% is a lot in just four years...
Mind you:
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The authors find the star’s brightness slowly decreased over time until early 2012, when it rapidly dimmed in brightness by 2 percent over six months.
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Old 10-27-2016, 09:10 AM   #84
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And another one here: The Greenbank observatory will observe the star for three times, each hours each observation session, during the next months.

http://news.berkeley.edu/2016/10/25/...nd-weird-star/
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Old 05-19-2017, 09:19 PM   #85
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Default KIC 8462852 has another dimming event

Tabby's star appears to be dipping again today! This is the first major dip since the Kepler mission.


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Old 05-19-2017, 10:35 PM   #86
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It seems that Dr. Boyajian predicted this last year:

http://www.wherestheflux.com/single-...in-May-of-2017
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:50 PM   #87
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Originally Posted by boogabooga View Post
 It seems that Dr. Boyajian predicted this last year:

http://www.wherestheflux.com/single-...in-May-of-2017
Yup, pretty telling if so, as it would seem to suggest it's associated with something orbiting the star.

I watched Dr. Wright's video update of today's events and he presented a pretty interesting model that connects the long term dimming with the short term dimming. The model suggests that the long term dimming could be as a result of the star releasing energy after consuming a planet, and the short term dimming could be the result of material leftover from that event in an elliptical orbit, which results in the extreme, short term dimming we're seeing.
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Old 05-20-2017, 10:05 AM   #88
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It seems that Dr. Boyajian predicted this last year:
After the first two observations, they were working under the assumption that the pattern was regular. They missed the last measurement, and waited for the interval to recur to confirm that assumption. I knew that the measurement was coming up this month, but forgot about it.

So they were ready this time, and the dip indeed occured. That's pretty much confirmation that it is a regular occurence, then. Let's wait if the new data can bring any further clues as to what might be causing it.

Darn, I wanted to post a video that had a really nice summary of tabby's stars history, but I can't find it anymore.

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Old 05-20-2017, 11:03 PM   #89
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I think we are starting to move further away from "I don't know, therefore aliens" though.
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Old 05-21-2017, 04:37 PM   #90
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Dip is ongoing.

Jason Wright on Twitter: "@astronomeara @nbatalha Just emailed you. Yes! Latest photometry shows this event is complex and continuing.
thanks!
@tsboyajian"


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 I think we are starting to move further away from "I don't know, therefore aliens" though.
Not so, so far no possible explanation has been ruled out. The latest Astronomers Telegram though with a spectral analysis of the star showed no difference in the star's absorption spectrum, at least in H-alpha and Calcium triplet regions, when compared with a reference date of July 4, 2016 (a date where the star's brightness was considered steady). More detailed spectral analysis is needed though and interstellar dust is still a possibility (dust will reveal itself through more dimming at shorter wavelengths, so UV, and so far we haven't seen any data on that released to the public). However, if the dip is achromatic (the same on all channels) then all bets will be off.

---------- Post added at 04:37 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:19 PM ----------

Friday's dip is a near perfect match for a previous dip recorded by Kepler.


Last edited by Kyle; 05-21-2017 at 01:27 PM.
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