Orbiter-Forum  

Go Back   Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Astronomy & the Night Sky
Register Blogs Orbinauts List Social Groups FAQ Projects Mark Forums Read

Astronomy & the Night Sky Astronomy news & discussions, Astrophotography, Telescopes, Star Charts, & more. Galaxies, Stars, Planets & Moons, discuss it all here!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-05-2012, 04:58 PM   #16
Gerdih
Orbinaut
Default

If I can I will try to do something with a paper and my telescope but I see Im in the limit of the visibility. Moreover 5 or 6 are not on a weekend.
Gerdih is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 10:34 PM   #17
Unstung
Ευρώπη Clipper
 
Unstung's Avatar
Default

I wonder if I can directly take a picture of the sun during the transit using a neutral density filter on my lens.
Unstung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 08:43 PM   #18
orb
O-F Administrator
Ninja
 
orb's Avatar

Default

SPACE.com:
orb is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-22-2012, 04:13 PM   #19
orb
O-F Administrator
Ninja
 
orb's Avatar

Default

The Planetary Society Blog: Some Details About Transits of Venus

A nice diagram in there:

Transits and Inferior Conjunctions of Venus, 2001-2242
David Shortt
orb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2012, 02:23 PM   #20
orb
O-F Administrator
Ninja
 
orb's Avatar

Default

ESA: Get ready for the transit of Venus!

NASA: The 2012 Transit of Venus
orb is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-29-2012, 04:29 PM   #21
Ripley
Tutorial translator
 
Ripley's Avatar
Default

Found this
http://www.sunaeon.com/venustransit/
Ripley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2012, 08:55 AM   #22
NovaSilisko
The Siliskoiest of Siliskos
 
NovaSilisko's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ripley View Post
I think I broke it

NovaSilisko is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-30-2012, 11:43 AM   #23
Marvin42
Mostly Harmless
 
Marvin42's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NovaSilisko View Post
 I think I broke it
Yeah, you did (website is down ). Pray for the probe to bring it back online.


If an orbinautor does make a picture, hope posts it here also.

Update: Probe works: it's back online...and still broken


Last edited by Marvin42; 05-30-2012 at 11:54 AM. Reason: Update:
Marvin42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-30-2012, 12:49 PM   #24
astrosammy
Dash!
 
astrosammy's Avatar

Default

Checked it in Stellarium, it seems to be nearly correct.

Weather for next week is looking bad right now, but I purchased some filter foil to build a filter for my telescope.
If weather is bad I'll try to find a good place within the next 100 km. If not... well, I saw the 2004 one...
astrosammy is online now   Reply With Quote
Thanked by:
Old 05-30-2012, 01:30 PM   #25
T.Neo
SA 2010 Soccermaniac
 
T.Neo's Avatar
Default

I had a pair of eclipse glasses, but I don't know where they are. I want to try and make my own solar viewer, and a pinhole projector seems the easiest option, but I'm concerned that aiming it correctly at the sun will be challenging.

Which is the cheapest, easiest, most satisfying and least injurious way to view phenomena such as transits and sunspots?
T.Neo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2012, 05:01 PM   #26
NovaSilisko
The Siliskoiest of Siliskos
 
NovaSilisko's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Neo View Post
 I had a pair of eclipse glasses, but I don't know where they are. I want to try and make my own solar viewer, and a pinhole projector seems the easiest option, but I'm concerned that aiming it correctly at the sun will be challenging.

Which is the cheapest, easiest, most satisfying and least injurious way to view phenomena such as transits and sunspots?
The best way I've found is to use a telescope or binoculars (with one side covered) to project an image of the sun onto something. No modifications necessary, so no extra cost.
NovaSilisko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2012, 01:02 PM   #27
Ripley
Tutorial translator
 
Ripley's Avatar
Default

ESA's Venus transit monitor

http://www.rssd.esa.int/index.php?pr...=venus_transit
Ripley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 03:33 AM   #28
Artlav
Aperiodic traveller
 
Artlav's Avatar

Default

Here it will happen from sunrise till a few hours later.
Did a dry run and location reconnaissance today.

My windows turned out to be on the wrong side, and there is a building on the right one, putting the roof is out of the question too.
So, i go for a nice view from the hill.


The idea is pretty simple - project the image directly from the scope+barlow lens onto a screen, put a tent around it all to keep all the image-obscuring light out, observe.


The sun lazily crawls up, looking like someone sat on it.


Once it's high enough, the image becomes pretty clear (but not the photo - i didn't have a spare tripod since i didn't really plan on taking pictures this time).


You can clearly see some sunspots, and they are even visible in the crappy photo.


An SDO image for comparison, mind the mirroring


Looks like everything is ready for the event, i'll post the pictures if the weather doesn't foul the plans.
Artlav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 03:38 AM   #29
Cras
Spring of Life!
 
Cras's Avatar
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Neo View Post
 I had a pair of eclipse glasses, but I don't know where they are. I want to try and make my own solar viewer, and a pinhole projector seems the easiest option, but I'm concerned that aiming it correctly at the sun will be challenging.

Which is the cheapest, easiest, most satisfying and least injurious way to view phenomena such as transits and sunspots?
Those cheapy eclipse glasses that resemble old school 3d glasses is probably the easiest. Those things are very cheap, and most telescope, museum, science stores carry them.

or some welder's glass. that is quite cheap. Not easy to find shade 14, Will probably have to find an actual welder supply to get those, but it is quite cheap, easy , and perfectly safe.
Cras is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2012, 02:15 PM   #30
tblaxland
Webmaster
 
tblaxland's Avatar


Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by astrosammy View Post
 If weather is bad I'll try to find a good place within the next 100 km.
We've got an east coast low forming at present...Those things are notorious for hanging around all week long in winter and blanketing the length of the New South Wales coastal lowlands in drizzling rain and overcast - that eliminates the prospect of avoiding it by travel within any reasonable distance. This one is looking no different
tblaxland is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Orbiter-Forum > Far Side of the Moon > Astronomy & the Night Sky


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:55 AM.

Quick Links Need Help?


About Us | Rules & Guidelines | TOS Policy | Privacy Policy

Orbiter-Forum is hosted at Orbithangar.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2007 - 2012, Orbiter-Forum.com. All rights reserved.